NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS - 1900

Friday, January 5, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Chas. WHITE, of Texas township.

Mrs. PRYOR, mother of Arthur PRYOR, was acquitted at Vandalia on the charge of being accessory to the murder of her husband. Arthur is in jail here.

Friday night F. C. DAVIDSON, T. H. SLICK, L. R. MURPHY and A. H. ISABEL held their birthday anniversary banquet in Clinton. They were born on Dec. 28. The four who were guests were Dr. WILCOX, M. D. EPPSTEIN, Fred BALL and Mr. KNAP, the latter of Bement.

The widow and heirs of the late Geo. HARTSOCK have made the following pision of real estate: Emily HARTSOCK et al to Ralph HARTSOCK, ne of no of sec. 11, town 19, and $50. Same to Emerson HARTSOCK, nw of sw and 1 acres in sw cor of sw of nw sec. 16 and $50. Same to Chas. M. HARTSOCK, nw of nw of sec. 1, town 19, and $50. Same to Wm. H. HARTSOCK, sw of sw sec. 1, town 19 and $50. Same to Etta M. HARTSOCK se of sw sec. Town 19 and $50. Emily Hartsock et al to Emily Hartsock, sw of sw of sec. 1, ne of nw of sec. 12, se of ne and ne of se of sec. 11, town 19.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 5, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

Some of the comrades of Seward Nelson Post called on W. A. HICKMAN Friday and took dinner with them and reminded him it was his birthday and anniversary.

MIDLAND CITY.

Mr. and Mrs. Otto BARNETT are the proud parents of a little daughter.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 12, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

IN THIS COUNTY OVER SEVENTY YEARS.

Isaac ELLINGTON, near Waynesville, is one of the best known men in the west part of the county; and few, if any, have lived in the county longer. His parents settled near Waynesville in 1828, and that vicinity has since been his home. He says in 1828 there were only three buildings in Bloomington, and one of them was a blacksmith shop. Also that at that time there were  only five buildings in Springfield and three of them log cabins. He has seen the wonderful change that has come to Central Illinois since 1828 and few who have lived 77 years, as he has, can recite more interestingly the pioneer days of this country. While he has witnessed the growth of the county, he has seen the REGISTER grow until it ranks among the best country papers in Illinois. He has been a regular subscriber for twenty years and always pays his subscription in advance.


Friday, January 12, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

HOW MAROA WAS NAMED.

The question is sometimes asked: "How did Maroa get its name?"  It is explained as follows:  The name was given it by the Illinois Central railroad. They run out of names and five officials whose duty it was to name all new towns along the Central agreed to throw a few letters of the alphabet into a hat, and to make a name of them. The letters thrown into the hat were A, M, A, R and O. Out of this combination the name Maroa was finally formed. Maroa is the only town of this name in the United States


Friday, January 12, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. F. PURVIS Dec. 7.

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. J. AUGHINBAUGH, of Kenney.

Judge Webb, of Pana, was in Clinton this week. He says there is little doubt of Arthur PRYOR being acquitted of the charge of killing his father.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 19, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

JAMES HOPPER FOUND GUILTY.

The trial of James HOPPER, charged with shooting at H. C. CLINE with intent to kill, occupied about two days in the circuit court, the case going to the jury after 12 o'clock Wednesday night. The jury returned a verdict yesterday about 3 o'clock, finding Hopper guilty. Judge COCHRAN sentenced him to six months in jail and imposed a fine of $100.


Friday, January 19, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Emerson VANDERVORT Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. M. E. SMITH, of Urbana, attended the funeral of Mrs. S. M. ARGO. Mrs. Smith is a daughter of Mr. ARGO.

Alex JACKSON went to Peoria Monday to attend the funeral of his brother, Zeke JACKSON, who died Sunday night. Deceased lived in Clinton several years ago and conducted a barber shop. He was not married.

J. G. ROYCE received word this week of the death of his grandfather at Hamburg, Mich., aged 87.

Marian JOHNSON, eldest son of J. F. JOHNSON, of this city, submitted to a very difficult operation in Chicago last week, and is still in the hospital. The operation was to improve the young man's speech by an operation upon the palate.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 19, 1900 
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

SUCCESSFUL IN LIFE.
Much Achieved By A Tunbridge Township Farmer.
Has, by His Own Efforts, Amassed a Fortune of Two Hundred Thousand Dollars.

Picture of Edmund W. Fruit.Edmund W. FRUIT was a caller at the REGISTER office Tuesday, and in talking of his early life in DeWitt county gave some interesting facts, as well as thoughts that would be very valuable to young men, if acted upon.

Mr. Fruit was born in Christian county, Ky., Sept. 21, 1823, and is in his 77th year. While he is nearly four score years, he has the appearance of being much younger, though no man in the county has been more active through his whole life. His parents, Thomas and Elizabeth FRUIT, came to Illinois, settling in what is now ridge township in 1834, this county being a part of Macon county. Edmund was 11 years old at that time and had attended school about three months. When the family came to Illinois, he had to assist his father in making a home in the then "Wild West," and had no opportunity to attend school. He remained with his father until 20 years old when he traded a horse for 40 acres of land, which is now a part of his homestead near Kenney. This was the beginning of the building up of a landed estate that consists of over 2,400 acres of as fine land as there is in DeWitt or any other county. The highest he paid for any land was $85 an acre. He does not own an acre in any other county, and none of his farms are over two and a half miles from market. He owns near Kenney 1,460 acres that can be traveled over without stepping foot on land owned by another. He says he would not take $100 an acre for all the land he has. He says he may not live to see the time it is worth that amount, but his children will. He thinks the people do no realize what Illinois land will be worth. Mr. Fruit's wealth shows what can be done by industry, and economy. When Mr. Fruit bought his first 40 acres, he made rails and fenced it. Then he borrowed $50 to buy 40 acres joining, making 80 acres. Then he built a log house, made his beds, tables and chairs, and the doors were hung on wooden hinges that he made. He says the mistake many young men make is in buying fine furniture, an organ or piano before they have their home paid for. He thinks there is ample opportunity for young men to accumulate property in Illinois if they are industrious and use good judgment.

He oversees his vast estate, and asks only grain rent except for lots and pasture land. He does not ask grain rent because he thinks the farmer who does his work well, and for causes he cannot prevent, his crop is short or a failure that he should be made to stand the whole loss. He says the man who owns the land is usually more able to stand the loss than the man who rents it. Though Mr. Fruit has done such a large business, he always fills out two leases, one of which he gives to the tenant, so that he may know at any time just what he has agreed to. In this way there is no cause for misunderstanding, hence no lawsuits.

Mr. Fruit's life has been such that young men can learn a lesson from it that would be valuable. In addition to being industrious and economical he has never gone in debt beyond his means. He has never used tobacco in any way, and was never under the influence of liquor. He strongly condemns anyone who is not honorable and upright; and believes people should not encourage those who are inclined to be reckless and not economical by giving them credit beyond a reasonable limit. He is ready to help those who help themselves, and there is perhaps not a more lenient landlord in DeWitt county.

A few years ago Mr. Fruit decided to retire from active farm life and bought a fine farm of 175 acres joining Kenney and built a fine residence at the north limits of that town. Besides his landed interests he owns business property in Kenney. At a fair estimate, his property is worth $200,000. The accumulation of his vast estate is due to Mr. Fruit's foresight, industry and economy. Beginning his business life in a log hut with a puncheon floor, furnished with rude furniture made by himself, he made money by attending strictly to business; and by putting his surplus into land he was able to add a farm to his estate every few years. His age marks the growth of his county. He knows its progress better than compilers of its history write it. In the sixty-five years he has lived in it, he has witnessed the beginning of and growth of Clinton as well as other places in the county. Where Clinton is was then prairie, and his father built the first house which was across the street west of the city hall. He thinks part of the building now there is a part of the house built by his father.

While Mr. Fruit has never been active in politics he has always been a Democrat, and his advice has often been sought by those more active in political work.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 19, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

Several of the near relatives and neighbors took Mrs. A. D. METZ by surprise Tuesday and came with their dinners to remind Mrs. Metz she was fifty-two years old. All enjoyed a good social time.

Dr. G. W. ROBERTSON reports the arrival of a little daughter at his home.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 19, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

A LUCKY DISCOVERY.
James Bell's House Found To Be on Fire in the Parlor—Damage Covered by Insurance.

Yesterday about 11 o'clock a member of J. W. BELL's family went into the parlor and found the room filled with smoke and fire. The fire had originated in the lounge in the room and rapidly spread, burning lace curtains, portiers and the carpet. By considerable difficulty the flames were put out. The cause of the fire is a mystery as no fire of any kind was in the room, excepting a hard coal stove. It is thought, however, that the filling of the lounge was composed of material that caused spontaneous combustion from the heat of the stove as the lounge was but a few feet from the stove. It was a lucky escape from a destructive fire. The insurance will enable Mr. Bell to not suffer any loss. The fire department was not called out.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 26, 1900 
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

F. M. and W. M. PHARES attended the funeral of L. S. PHARES at New Grand Chain Monday.

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. J. B. BRYANT, of DeWitt. The father is 81 and the mother 29 years old.

Lafayette COX, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. C. R. SMITH, near Farmer City, was 75 years old. Mrs. C. HUFFMAN, who died in that city was 61 years old.

Sheriff SHUE and Deputy BRYANT took Wm. H. ANDREWS, whose crime was forgery, and Jacob WALTERS, who burglarized Mr. MASON's house near Wapella, to Chester penitentiary the first of the week.

Tom DILLOW, who had been in jail fifty days charged with throwing stones at a train, was tried in county court yesterday and discharged. Jas. HOUSTON, of Weldon, arrested on a charge by Miss SPARROW, was found guilty, but the judge has not fixed the fine.p>

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, January 26, 1900 
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

SERIOUS CHARGE.
James W. Griffin and Dr. Edmonson, of
Maroa, Arrested For Alleged Criminal Practice.

James W. GRIFFIN, a well known young cigarmaker of the city of Maroa was arrested yesterday by Sheriff LEHMAN on the serious charge of abortion. The arrest was made on a capias from the grand jury. Last night Sheriff Lehman made a second trip to Maroa and arrested Dr. Geo. S. EDMONSON on the same charge. Dr. Edmonson is one of the most prominent young doctors of the north part of the county and the arrest created a sensation in the little town. The friends of the doctor immediately came to his rescue and bonds in the sum of $700 was furnished which saved him from making a late trip to Decatur in the company of the sheriff. The friends of Griffin came to his aid last night and he was released on a bond of $700 about 10 o'clock last night and returned to Maroa on the Diamond Special this morning.

The arrest of the two men is the result of a criminal operation alleged to have been performed on Miss Edna HORSEMAN over a year ago. The young woman is a resident of the town of Maroa, where she makes her home in the family of her uncle. The peculiar feature of the affair is that the arrest of Griffin and the doctor is not instigated by the young woman in the case but on the other hand she and Griffin seem to be on the best of terms and were seen together on the streets of Decatur yesterday and returned to Maroa together in company on the train just before the sheriff made the arrest.

Griffin is a young man apparently 27 years of age and of rather prepossessing appearance. When seen at the jail last night after his release he said that he did not expect to have any difficulty in establishing his innocence of the charge. He said that he was not guilty and that the prosecution was the result of ill feeling toward him of some of the relatives of the girl and that he thought her uncle was the prime mover in the prosecution. On the bonds the two men were cited to appear in the circuit court Monday morning.—Decatur Herald.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 2, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. F. JONES, of Clinton, Jan. 26.

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Walter ROBINSON, of Farmer City.

A daughter was born Tuesday to Mr. and Mrs. E. D. MAYALL.

Mrs. Michael J. CAINAN, of this city, was adjudged insane and taken to the asylum.

Mr. and Mrs. C. P. SPRAGUE celebrated his 53rd birthday anniversary by entertaining a few friends.

Arthur PRYOR, who was fined $25 for stealing a watch of Lee GIFT, near Weldon, for whom he was working, was released Wednesday and returned to his home at Vandalia. His friends paid the fine. He is charged with killing his father near Vandalia a few weeks ago.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 2, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

Kenney.

Kenney has had two fires this week. Fran FORT’s residence caught fire from a defective flue, but was soon put out. Tuesday about 9 o'clock a.m. the Pythian hotel caught fire in the parlor, where the landlady, Mrs. LOBAUGH, sleeps. She left her pocketbook under the pillow containing about $20. After the fire the money was missing.

Wapella.

J. A. DUNCAN’s attended the funeral of their niece, Miss ELY, in Clinton.

Waynesville.

Ira CISCO and family have moved to Tennessee.

Midland City.

Jan. 26, in response to neat invitations issued by J. B. SHAW and daughter a large number of neighbors and friends assembled at their home to remind Mrs. SHAW that the forty-sixth milestone of her life had been reached. She had been visiting in Lincoln and when she returned on the six o'clock train found herself in a position like the British at Ladysmith, taken by surprise. A very enjoyable evening was spent in conversation, music, cake walks, etc. Then came a surprise for the guests, for they were invited to the dining room, where a three course supper of a most excellent quality was daintily served. At a late hour the friends reluctantly departed for their homes convinced that Mr. Shaw’s family understand entertaining their guests and wishing Mrs. Shaw many more happy returns of her birthday.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 2, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

Mrs. W. W. NEWMAN received a center table from friends on her wedding anniversary a few days ago.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank DUNCAN of Chicago, formerly of Clinton, lost their child, nearly 1 year, by death.

W. A. CUMMING, formerly of Farmer City, is located at Portland Ore., and is one of the faculty of a dental college there.

Wiley SMITH, supervisor of Barnett township, went to Chicago Tuesday night to make arrangements for moving to that city in two or three weeks. He will work in the stock yards, perhaps for the firm of which Robert BOWLES is a member.

A. H. SCOTT has gone to Butte, Mont., where he has an offer to work in a bank at a good salary. He has gone to see how he will like the country and if he is pleased with it, will accept the position, but will return to Clinton before beginning work.

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. LAFFERTY left Wednesday afternoon for a six weeks stay in the South. Most of the time will be spent in Florida, but they expect to visit New Orleans, Atlanta, Ga., and other large cities.

J. HENDERSON of Barnett township, traded his farm of 220 acres for land near Jewell, Ia., and will move to that state.

One of Mrs. G. SCHWEIZER’s children, aged 4 years, caused its parents much alarm by putting a button in its nose. It took a physician two hours to remove the button.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 2, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

BURLARS’ BIG BUSINESS.
A Pair of Thieves Enter Seven Buildings in One Night—
Supposed to Be Home Talent.

Though Saturday night was a zero night, it did not prevent a pair of enterprising burglars doing a thriving business in the after part of the night

The residence of Mrs. EMMETT in the east part of the city is thought to have been the first place visited. There they got a watch belonging to Harry EMMETT, an engineer, and some other articles of little value.

Then the residence of Mrs. John WIGHTWICK was entered, but some of the family awoke and they left without securing anything.

The next place seemed to have been the residence of Mrs. GLEADALL, on South Monroe street, where they raised a window and one of them entered the room, but found a dresser in front of him. One of Mrs. Gleadall’s daughters was awake and heard one of the thieves say: "I cannot get through here." They then went to another window and entered the house. Then Miss GLEADALL called to her mother. This made them hasten out.

The next house that was in line was T. J. ARGO’s where they were heard when they stumbled over a rug, and left without securing anything.

Three blocks west, on South Center street, they entered the home of Ol SPRINGER, an engineer, and were lucky in not waking Mr. Springer. They took his watch, $30 in cash and some clothing; also a new pair of shoes, leaving an old pair and a pair of mittens, belonging to Harry EMMETT. They were bold enough to eat part of what they found cooked.

It would have seemed that the work this far should have satisfied the burglars, but they attempted to enter the house of Henry CAREY, a block away. But Mr. CAREY heard them raising a window to his room, and asked what was wanted. They did not tarry to tell him.

A block north they entered the basement of Phil WOLF’s residence, but as the door leading to the basement was locked, they failed to get pay for their trouble.

They finished up their night’s work by entering the office of Ed SWEENEY over the National bank. They opened the safe and pried open the drawers, but there was no money there, so they were again disappointed.

On the same floor is the office of Fred HILL to which they tried to gain entrance, but the Yale lock was too much for them.

It was thought the work of home talent, and two Illinois Central detectives came from Chicago.

Fred BOTKIN was arrested, as it was claimed the shoes left at SPRINGER’s resembled those worn by BOTKIN; but he produced the shoes he had been wearing, and there being no evidence that he was guilty, he was discharged. It was charged that the boy’s father, J. B. BOTKIN, chief of police of Clinton, burned the old shoes Mr. SPRINGER gave him because they were his son’s. Mr. BOTKIN denies this emphatically and says he burned them because he did not think they could be of any use in locating the thieves, as they were well worn.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 9, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Nason KELLOGG, near Cllinton.

Ephraiam PAGE, who lived half a mile east of Farmer City, died Monday, aged 70.

In the case of Clara BUTLER for separate maintenance from her husband, George BUTLER, of Kenney, she was allowed $500 a-year and a home to live in. The case of Nellie FOULKS, of Farmer City, for the same cause, was continued, with temporary alimony allowance of $10 a month.

A number of friends of Fred FLEMMING called on him Tuesday night to celebrate his 19th birthday anniversary.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 9, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

Wapella.

Sunday being Thos. WILLIS’ 34th birthday, his wife invited about fifty neighbors and relatives to eat turkey. At noon Rev. Robertson in his usual pleasing manner presented Mr. Willis with an elegant rocking chair in behalf of the guests.

Walnut Grove.

Saturday W. G. PAGE received word from Farmer City that his cousin, E. PAGE, was dead.

Birkbeck.

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer TUGGLE are the parents of a twelve pound baby boy. That adds one more Democrat to our neighborhood.

Waynesville.

A daughter was born Saturday to Mr. and Mrs. William WRICH.

Robert LEACH, near Maroa, will leave next Tuesday for his future home in Iowa.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 9, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

BULLET IN HIS HEAD.
Mr. James Butterworth Carried One for Thirty-Seven Years
and Did Not Know It.

For the past thirty-seven years Mr. James BUTTERWORTH, of the Wakefield Shoe company, has at times suffered severe pains in the vicinity of his right ear and was at a loss to know the cause, until a local physician relieved the pain. Mr. Butterworth served in Battery K Illinois light artillery and while fighting Longstreet, a shell burst near him although he felt a sharp pain in the head at the time, in the excitement of the fighting he finished the battle and beheld the retreat of Longstreet the same day. The wound did not incapacitate Mr. Butterworth from duty and he served his entire time to the end of the war, although being entirely deaf in the right ear. Last week the pain became unbearable and after consulting a local physician, he was very much surprised to have taken out of his ear a bullet that he had unknowingly carried there for thirty-seven years.    —Pantagraph

Mr. Butterworth is the father of Geo. W. BUTTERWORTH of the firm Latimer and Butterworth, of Clinton.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 16, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

City and County.

A daughter was born last week to Mr. and Mrs. H. M. CLARK, of Wabash, Ind.  They moved from Clinton over a year ago.

John CRUMP, who is charged with taking a lady’s rap, as he left the train at Maroa sometime ago, was arrested by Daniel Stivers today and turned over to the Macon county authorities.  Mr. Crump has been working at the carpenter’s trade here for several years.

Kenny.

Trent FARIS was arrested last Saturday by the sheriff of Macon county, and placed in jail.  The charge is mortgaging property that he did not own.

Local and General News.

Frank WILLIAMS and L. DYNES, of Farmer City, are in jail on a charge of stealing a lap robe from a livery stable in that city.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 23, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

City and County.

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. L. T. DAVIS this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. BUTLER have agreed to agree and are again living together in Kenney.  At the last term of court Mrs. Butler was allowed $500 a year alimony and the use of the home place in Kenney.

John CRUM, who was taken to jail for stealing a collarette from a lady on the train between Decatur and Maroa, plead guilty and was fined $1 and given thirty days in jail at Decatur.  He will also have to pay the cost of suit.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


Friday, February 23, 1900
Clinton Register
Clinton, Illinois

THE WILL OF GEORGE MORE.
Judge Cochran Decides It Cannot Be Admitted to Probate—
Case Will Probably Be Appealed.

The will of the late Geo. MORE, who lived near Wapella, will not be probated unless the appellate court so decides.  Both witnesses to the will are dead and as their signatures were not attested to the attorneys, O. E. Harris and E. B. Mitchell, for the plaintiff, regarded this point sufficient to make the will invalid and the case came up at the December term of court.  Judge Cochran took the case under advisement, and did not give a decision until Saturday.

The will provided that the farm of 200 acres and other property should go to the wife and adopted children.  If the appellate court sustains Judge Cochran&8217;s decision, half the property will go to the widow and the rest to brothers and sisters of deceased.$nbsp; The point raised by the attorneys is a new one and there is little doubt of the case being appealed.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd


June 8, 1900
Clinton Register

IS A NOTED CROOK.
J. B. Evans, Who Robbed the Wapella Post Office, an Escaped Convict.

It turns out that J. B. EVANS, who robbed the Wapella post office, and was arrested in Bloomington next morning with a lot of one and two dollar bills in his possession, is Ed RATTIGAN, one of the cleverest crooks in the country, the only one that has ever succeeded in blowing a latest model time-lock safe. This he did in Wisconsin, was captured and sent to the penitentiary, from where he soon escaped. $100 reward was offered for his arrest, but he will no doubt serve a term in Illinois before that reward is payable.

The night of May 15, the Wapella post office was robbed of about $225 in money and stamps. News of the robbery was sent to Bloomington. Next morning a man asked to exchange twenty one dollar bills for a twenty. The cashier thought him the man who had been at Wapella and sent for an officer, who arrested him. About $100 in small bills was found in his possession. One of the bills was marked with a blue pencil, and Postmaster ROLOFSON identified it as one of those stolen. Some of Wapella's citizens identified the man as the one they had seen in Wapella the day before the robbery. His bond was fixed at $2,000, which he could not fill and was taken to Springfield. He gave the name of J. B. Evans.

The inspectors had his picture taken and sent to Chicago, where the police recognized it as Eddie Rattigan, who had worked extensively in Chicago and other large cities. He is said to have been a criminal from boyhood, having been disowned by his family very ...(paper torn). It is probable the federal grand jury will indict him for the Wapella robbery and he will be sent to the penitentiary. He is 5 feet 8 inches tall, dark complexion and weighs 160 pounds.


July 13, 1900
Clinton Register

Samuel McCONKEY was seriously injured in a runaway here Wednesday morning. One leg was horribly mangled, both bones being broken below the knee. A piece of bone protruded through the flesh about three inches. The wound is of a very serious nature.

Note: Samuel died the following day; s/o Alexander and Catharine (LAFFERTY) McCONKEY.


July 26, 1900 
Clinton Register

Taken To His Home.

Harry FINFROCK was taken to his home near Waynesville Tuesday afternoon. He did not know of the death of his sister, Eva, until Monday night when Drs. WILCOX and GRAHAM told him. For several days he had insisted on knowing why his sister did not come to see him, and when he asked for her Monday night, they told him all about the accident that resulted in the death of his sister. They told him he was hurt by being caught by a train. He then asked if Eva was hurt and was told she was hurt worse than he was. When he learned of her death he wept bitterly and often spoke of her during the night. The last thing he remembered of doing the morning of the accident was putting his rubber boots on before starting from home. He did not remember the heavy rain that was falling at the time of the accident.

(See related news article)


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