NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS - 1887

January 14, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Over the prairie to the poor-house went poor old Mrs. Sallie KETTERMAN, of DeWitt township. She had lived in that township for nearly forty years and raised a family of children, of which at least two boys are known to be living. The Kettermans were not a thrifty family or they might have owned a farm, for when they first came to this county, land was to be had almost for a song. Her husband was a soldier during the war and died some years ago. While the old woman was able to work, she managed to eke out a living, but now that the winters of three-score and ten have frosted her venerable head , away to the poor-house she must go. Her son lives in DeWitt township, but he thinks it is all he can do to take care of his own family. For her few remaining years the poor old woman will have a comfortable home at the expense of the county, but what a fate has been reserved for her. Sylvanus KETTERMAN, her husband, was a member of Co. F, Ninety-fourth Illinois Infantry, and served from August 7, 1862, to July 17, 1865. For disability he received a pension, but when he died the pension stopped.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 14, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. W. F. BETTS sold some property she owned in Bloomington and very wisely invested $5100 of the money in the purchase of Charles RICHTER's home farm in DeWitt township. It will make a good home for herself and husband whenever Mr. BETTS concludes to turn farmer. Mr. Betts is a machinist in the Central railroad shops in this city.


Someone has been making free with M. S. HENDRICK's tool house. A few weeks ago the lock was taken off during the night and several valuable tools, such as saws, chisels, hammers, etc., were stolen. One night last week another visit, presumably by the same parties, was made to the tool house, the door was forced open, and nearly all that remained of the kit of tools was carried off.


Two weeks ago we published an item to the effect that Ril JEFFREY had shipped a half car-load of hogs that averaged 541 lbs. each, and Ril's claim that it was the best average ever sold in this county. J. E. BRITTIN differs with Mr. Jeffrey as to their being the largest and best lot sold in the county. Mr. Brittin lays claim to having sold to William MAGILL, some years ago, eight hogs that averaged 632 lbs. each.


The Rev. A. T. ORR began a series of meetings in the M. E. Church this week, and thus far large audiences attend every evening. The meetings will be continued if sufficient interest is maninfested.


Sheriff GARDINER has the California fever, and some time about the 1st of February he intends to remove to Fresno with his family. His son-in-law, Mr. OWENS, of Farmer City, and his family will accompany the sheriff.


Sam GRAVES, who stole the overcoat from Fosnaugh & Co.'s store a few weeks ago, was tried this morning in the county court. Judge INGHAM sentenced him to twenty days in the county jail and assessed a fine of $10 and costs.


GRAHAM & MONSON have formed a partnership in the law business, and as both are men of fine legal training and of first-class intellectual ability they will make a strong firm. They occupy Judge Graham's old office, in the National Bank building.


L. D. SCOTT, of Tunbridge, and Mr. FARIS, of Beason, started last Tuesday for California in company with Charles RICHTER. Mr. Scott merely goes to see the country, while Mr. Faris and Mr. Richter expect to buy property there and finally become settlers. Mr. Faris is the son-in-law of Mr. Isham HARROLD, of Wapella.

The board of supervisors, at their session yesterday, appropriated $200 for the purpose of buying a strip of ground west of the soldiers' monument in the cemetery. The original plot devoted to burial purposes for soldiers is full, and the new purchase was necessary. This lot is free for the burial of soldiers from any part of the country.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 14, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The telephone company, despite the protests of its local manager, Mr. J. D. ROGERS, ordered the removal of the telephone from the Central ticket office the other day. As soon as the subscribers learned that the instrument was removed, they raised such a breeze that the company was compelled to replace it. The telephone at the depot is of special importance to the Magill House and the livery barns and without it they would have ordered out their phones. When the telephone system was first established in Clinton, the company urged the postmaster to put an instrument in the post-office, agreeing to furnish it for $20 a year on account of the convenience it would be to their customers. In about a year afterward the company violated its contract by trying to raise the price, which the postmaster refused to accede to. The telephone was no special convenience to the postmaster, but it was to those who had telephones in their business houses and residences.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

KENNEY.

At 8 o'clock yesterday morning the fire bell sounded the alarm of fire, which was at the residence of Mrs. WEBBER. The blaze was promptly extinguished by the use of buckets. The engine was of no use, owing to the shortness of the suction hose and the depth of the well.


Mrs. Matilda LACKEY is here visiting relatives.


Miss Hettie ORR visited in Mt. Pulaski Wednesday and Thursday of this week.


Miss Anna LINDLEY paid Bloomington a visit this week.


H. W. SPILLMAN, C. A. STEVENS and Arthur FRUIT attended the Masonic lodge at Maroa Tuesday night.


The funeral of Mrs. JETT was very large, though the day was intensely cold.


Mrs. PENCE, who has been visiting in this vicinity for some time past, returned to her home in Gibson City Tuesday.


Mrs. George B. GRAHAM attended the funeral of Mrs. JETT.


Dr. DOWNEY, of Clinton, made a professional call on the family of Joel WILLIAMS this week.


C. E. HOWARD paid the county seat a business call Tuesday.


Miss Ella HOWARD is visiting in Clinton this week.


Mr. LUNDY called on Decatur the first of the week.


John NEARING, our supervisor, visited the poor farm Thursday.


Rev. HALLER is holding meetings in the Christian Church.


There was a social party at the residence of R. ORR Friday night.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HOME NEWS.

Editorial Correspondence

Foosland, Illinois

Mrs. Worship GRAY, who has been visiting her son, Ira WILLIAMS, near this place, returned to Weldon on last Saturday.


Mrs. WIDNEY, who came here in company with Mrs. GRAY, still remains with her husband, visiting his parishioners and attending the meetings which are in progress in this village, and which are attended with considerable interest.


A child of Mr. GRIFFITH, formerly a resident of Clinton, has been very sick with lung fever, but is getting much better.


One occasionally gets a glimpse here of John SHINNEMAN, a former resident of Weldon, now living between here and Gibson City.


A very sad affair occurred near Osman last week. Mr. John WILLIAMS aged about sixty years, had been suffering with some form of disease which necessitated his taking medicine. He had been using a prescription prepared by a physician of Belleflower, who is sometimes under the influence of strong drink. On Thursday he had been at Belleflower on business, returning in the evening. Feeling symptoms of his disease he took a swallow of the medicine from the bottle containing it, and seated himself at the supper table. He was almost instantly seized with alarming symptoms and tried to get to bed but fell on the floor in convulsions. His wife hastened a boy for Dr. LOWRY, of Osman, only a half mile distant, but before he could be had Mr. Williams expired. During an easy moment he charged the family to have the medicine analyzed. He was buried at Mansfield on Saturday. He was a member of the Christian Church and a highly esteemed citizen of Belleflower township, McLean county. It is the opinion both of the physician who was called in and the community that he was poisoned by the medicine which he took, but of course this can not be determined until it has been analyzed.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On the 11th inst. the firm of AMSDEN & FUNK was dissolved by mutual consent, Mr. FUNK retiring from the business. Amsden & Funk became proprietors of the store shortly after the death of Mr. Henry MAGILL. Mr. Funk retires to engage in other business, and Mr. A. H. MAGILL takes his place in the firm, which is now known as C. F. Amsden & Co. Thus the business revolves back into the Magill family, the original founders of it. The new firm will be a strong one, both financially and in popularity, and will largely increase its list of customers. The old patrons of the firm of Magill Bros. will doubtless rejoice in the change, as it will look familiar to see a member of the old family behind the counter when they enter the store. We predict for the new firm a large measure of success.

Note: The partnership did not last long. Alfred H. MAGILL, age 27, killed himself April 12, 1887 [see obituary], and C. F. AMSDEN was sent to an insane asylum April 25, 1887.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On last Sunday Dr. BUCK, of Decatur, attended services in the M. E. Church in this city with Elder WILDER. It will be remembered that the Doctor was stricken with paralysis some time last summer, and that for weeks there was but little hope of his recovery. It was a pleasure to his old friends that the Doctor was able to visit Clinton once more, but that pleasure was greatly marred by his apparent infirmities. For more than a third of a century Dr. Buck has been a power in the Illinois conference of the M. E. Church, and he had but few equals in the pulpit. To see this grand old preacher now almost deprived of speech by paralysis is a sad spectacle. Twice he had been presiding elder of this district, and for four months at one time he had pastoral charge of the church in this city. The Doctor is one of the few Methodist preachers who is a Democrat in politics, but at the beginning and during the war he was a strong Union man and preached and made speeches for the Union. When Andrew JOHNSON became President he appointed Dr. Buck postmaster of Decatur. At that time the Doctor was also presiding elder. As the church would not consent to his holding both positions, the Doctor gave up the post-office.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

TEXAS.

Ry BLUE's child is some better.


Mr. PERSINGER was in Springfield last week.


Mr. BOLEN has a new girl at his house.


Jack SCHOBY has the sole right of taking all the girls in Texas township sleigh riding. One to make ready and two to go.


Mrs. B. F. SMITH has been very sick for the past two weeks.


There was an oyster entertainment at Jim KEMP's one night last week.


Nick HOFFMAN, Sam CRAIG and G. W. HUGHES have purchased new and fine sleighs.


Some trouble arose in the school and Mr. EDWARDS quietly threw up his hands. N. R. HUGHES was engaged to teach the remaining months.


L. D. SCOTT left on the 11th inst. for Fresno, California. He goes to look at the country.


Mr. Mason MOORE and Miss Adda RONEY were united in matrimony at Clinton January 12th, Rev. Mr. HUNTER, of that place, officiating.


Born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward SCHOBY, January 1(?)th, in Tunbridge township, a daughter.


Sleighing has been excellent this winter, and all have made good use of the "beautiful snow." All sizes, sorts, kinds and dimensions of sleighs are set in motion, and all seem to be content and happy in the style they represent. With or without the merry sleigh bells cheerful jingle, they all go riding.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

GOING TO CALIFORNIA.
After Forty-three Years Residence in DeWitt County, Mr. Thomas GARDINER Determines to Emigrate

About one year ago, the railroads to California got up a competition in rates and as the result it was about as cheap to take a trip to the Golden State as to New York. Thousands from all parts of the country took advantage of the cheap rates, and so well was a large number of them pleased with the climate and prospects of California that the emigration to that State during the past year has been without a parallel. And it is the thrifty class of citizens who are going—men having sufficient capital to buy land and locate where they please. Real estate in California has been boomed up to extravagant prices. When Dr. HUNT and his family went to Los Angeles from this city a few years ago, the Doctor bought land near that city almost as cheap as he could get good land for in this county. Land that he paid $40 and $50 an acre is now worth that many hundred dollars per acre. A couple of years ago the Doctor made an investment in a small tract in Pasadena, a few miles from Los Angeles for which he paid but a few hundred dollars. The other day he sold the same piece to a syndicate for $25,000.

Oscar J. WOODWARD went to Fresno, California, less than two years ago, and the prospects looking favorable, he and his partner, Mr. Jake VOGEL, invested $12,000 or $15,000 in land. Oscar went into the agency business on a large scale, and land that he bought for almost a song when he first went there has now increased in value till the price asked is only the limit of the purchaser's bank account. Oscar has flooded DeWitt county with pamphlets and circulars till now nearly everybody has the California fever. To read one of his pamphlets one would think that the moment an Illinoisan stepped into the Fresno country he had reached a veritable paradise. A number of families have already gone from this county to Fresno, and if the emigration continues in the same ratio, the whole of that country will be peopled by DeWitters.

Ex-Sheriff GARDINER had made up his mind when his official term expired that he would seek a home in Kansas, but in the past few weeks he has changed his mind. Next week he and his family will start for Fresno, and his son-in-law, Mr. James OWENS, and his wife and two children will accompany the sheriff. They intend to try California for one year, and if it does not come up to their expectations the sheriff says he will come back to DeWitt county and settle down for the balance of his life. For forty-three years Mr. Gardiner has lived in and near Farmer City, except during the years that he held the office of sheriff, and at his time of life, he finds it hard work to break away from acquaintances and the home around which so many memories linger. For three terms—in all a period of eight years—Mr. Gardiner has been honored by the people of this county in his election to the office of sheriff. As an evidence of his popularity, he was elected his first and second term by large majorities when the county was Republican. Although a strong Democrat, he could always rely on a large vote from his Republican friends.

A brief sketch of Mr. Gardiner's life will be of interest at this time. He was born in Pike county, Ohio, on the 18th of March, 1827, which makes his age on his next birthday sixty years. When he was four years old his parents moved to Indiana and lived there till September, 1843, when they came to this county and his father bought a farm one and half miles east of Mount Pleasant, now called Farmer City. Mr. Gardiner worked on the farm with his father till he was twenty-three years of age, when he determined to try town life for a time. He engaged himself as a clerk at Parmenter & Co.'s store in Farmer City, and after four years behind the counter he bought a farm of one hundred and three acres and again engaged in farming, in which business he continued for one year. Believing that there was more money in shop keeping than in following the plow, Mr. Gardiner formed a partnership with Mr. James LISENBY and opened a grocery and provision store in Farmer City. At the end of two years the firm sold their store to John R. BLACKFORD, and Mr. Gardiner bought a hotel and twenty-eight acres of land in the south part of Farmer City. In addition to keeping a hotel he bought and sold stock, and he remained in that business till August, 1862, when he sold out to enter the army. Part of the old hotel is now used as an ice house. Mr. Gardiner enlisted in Co. I, 107th Illinois Infantry, and served till January 1864, when he was discharged on account of disabilities. Returning home he bought a small farm of sixty acres half a mile south of Farmer City, and his principal business was dealing in stock. This farm he kept till 1882 and then sold it after he was elected sheriff.

Mr. Gardiner was married in September, 1851, to Miss Sarah E. McKINLEY, daughter of William McKINLEY, one of the early settlers of this county. He is the father of two daughters, one of whom is married to Mr. James OWENS, of Farmer City. The other daughter, Miss Mattie, lives with her parents. Mrs. OWENS has three children. Mr. Gardiner has been careful and frugal and to his new home in California he will take sufficient capital to buy a home that will make him independent. DeWitt county loses a good citizen and Fresno will gain one.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Mr. D. T. GAY is in the east buying new goods for the store of VOGEL & GAY.


Capt. H. H. MERRIMAN spent last Sunday in Peoria with his son-in-law and daughter.


Mrs. S. F. RUCKER fell down the cellar stairs in her house last Monday, and was badly injured.


Miss Nell COLLYER celebrated her eighteenth birthday last Tuesday evening, by inviting a large company of her young friends to tea.


William PERSINGER and W. Z. DEWEY have received appointments in the State-house at Springfield during the session of the legislature.


The First Baptist Church of this place last Sunday gave Rev. P. REYNOLDS, of Greenville, Ill., a unanimous call to this pastorate. He has accepted the call and begins his labors as pastor next Sunday.


The sons of the soldiers of the last war, will meet in J. H. ROBERTSON's office, in Weldon, on next Wednesday evening, at seven o'clock, for the purpose of organizing a camp of the Sons of Veterans in Weldon.


As Mrs. Thomas GABBER was going home from church on Wednesday night, she slipped and fell on the ice in front of Argo Bro.'s brick building on East Main street. One of her teeth was broken and she was somewhat bruised by the fall.


Mr. Leo MILLER, under the auspices of the Knights of Labor, delivered two lectures in this city, on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. Mr. Miller is a fine talker and is good at theorizing, but like a majority of such lecturers he fails in making practical suggestions.


The lamp lighter should revise his moon calendar. Till last night there was not a lamp lighted more than one block from the square. While Mr. WILLIAMS takes good care of the lamps, he is a little tardy in keeping track of the changes of the moon. The council should regulate this matter.


E. N. DAVIS & Sons, of Lincoln, who opened the Star shoe store in this city about seven months ago, sold their stock the other day to a firm who removed it to Minnesota. Davis & Sons did a fair business while in this city, but as it was only an experiment they did not come here with the expectation of remaining permanently.


The young people of Weldon are about organizing a society of Good Templars. We would advise every youth in the neighborhood to join it. It will educate them to become sober men. The young ladies should lend their influence. Save the boys from learning the drinking habit and when they become men they will be a blessing to the town and to themselves.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAYNESVILLE.

Coon hunting is the rage.


Scott ESKEW is able to be around.


The mercury was 20 degrees above Wednesday.


J. K. MARVEL was in Atlanta Friday on business.


James THOMPSON, Jr., is at home recruiting his health.


Mr. CULP paid Atlanta a visit this week.


Gotlieb MATSON hauled some corn to Wapella this week.


Mrs. John SHERMAN went to Atlanta last Friday.


Wm. TAYLOR has purchased James SELBY's share in the restaurant.


J. B. CRAWS returned to his home at Taylorville the first of the week.


Mrs. DUNHAM went to Nebraska on a visit Tuesday.


Misses May MILLS and Lena WHITEMAN visited Clinton Friday.


John ELLIS, of Heyworth, was her Saturday on a visit.


Thomas LAYTON has sold his farm and expects to go west.


Fred BALL has purchased his partner's share of their butcher shop.


B. S. PUMPELLY, the Chatsworth dentist, is at Dr. STARKEY's this week.


Mr. PAGE, the Bloomington sewing machine agent, was in Waynesville Saturday.


John MARVEL did not return to Nebraska, as was reported last week.


Benj. GARRETT and wife returned to Phillips, Neb., Tuesday.


Our blacksmiths are very busy this week. Two of them have been crippled at the business.


At the dance Monday night it is said that the hall was so cold that they could hardly make it go.


Fred BALL has resigned the office of village marshal, and Wm. CHRISTIE has been appointed to fill his place.


Charles CARSON and J. F. DIX have constructed a telegraph line from the post-office to the harness shop. Others will follow suit.


Messrs. BARR and SILVERS, with their families, returned to their homes last Tuesday.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 21, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FORTUNE SMILED UPON THEM.

As announced, THE PUBLIC on last Saturday afternoon divided $250 in presents among its subscribers. The distribution took place in the council chamber in the presence of nearly one hundred persons. Three subscribers were selected by those present to make the distribution. The $250 was divided into forty-two presents, and the following held the lucky receipts:

H. H. BEAL for E. G. SCOTT, of Schell City, Mo.—Domestic Sewing Machine
Charles WILMORE, Lane—Silver fruit dish
W. LITZENBERGER, Farmer City—Silver pickle dish
Mrs. L. K. ROSE, Clinton—Gold spectacles
Ben. CUNDIFF, Maroa—Butter knife
Wm. SIMMS, Grape Creek, Ill.—Silver watch
J. W. WILLIS, Heyworth—Silver cake stand
Samuel WILSON, Clinton—Pair Little Detective scales
A. M. McCONKEY, Wellington, Kans.—Silver pickle castor
Emma ERLENBUSH, Kansas City, Mo.—Silver cake stand
A. W. RAZEY, Clinton—Butter knife
John POLLOCK, Clinton—Pair Little Detective scales
J. A. COLLINS, LaCygne, Kans.—Lady's breastpin
Thomas HENSON, Clinton—Silver watch
F. B. JANSEN, Clinton—Pair cuff buttons
Mrs. Ella EDMISTON, Clinton—Silver teapot
D. W. DUCY, Kenney—Lady's pin
Levi CANTRALL, Waynesville—Pair Little Detective scales
HILLS Bros., Clinton—Pair cuff buttons
O. J. WOODWARD, California—Silver castor
Nils SWANSON, Dallas City, Ill.—Butter knife
P. H. MILLS, Clinton—Silver sugar bowl
J. W. LATTIMER, LaGrand, Kans.—Eight-day clock
D. S. COLE, Clinton—Lady's pin
Carl SWIGART, DeWitt—Pair Little Detective scales
H. P. SMITH, Elkhorn, Neb.—Silver pickle dish
L. WELDON, Wapella—Berry dish
S. DANISON, Weldon—Silver butter dish
Fanny LITTLE, Edwardsville, Ill.—Silver napkin ring
T. J. BAILEY, Waynesville—Gold eyeglasses
John HUBBEL, Wilson—Butter knife
Amos WEEDMAN, Farmer City—Silver cream pitcher
W. H. HARP, Waynesville—Silver watch
J. A. ZIEGLER, Clinton—Butter knife
Mrs. SMITH, Lincoln, Neb.—Silver cake basket
G. W. GIDEON, Clinton—Pair Little Detective scales
J. E. BRITTEN, Clinton—Silver butter dish
J. A. DUNCAN [no location]—Silver napkin ring
A. A. SPAFFORD, Wapella—Pair Little Detective scales
M. R. COLWELL, Clinton—Butter knife
D. C. JONES, Clinton—Silver watch

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 28, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ILLITERACY THE PERIL OF THE REPUBLIC.

The congress of the Republic is in great peril. No Guy Fawkes threatens it from subterranean vault. No foreign enemy bombards it from without. Its peril is one of neglect. Shall the measures involving the very existence of the Republic be adopted? I mean the bill for removing the illiteracy of the country by national aid to common schools. If the gavel of adjournment falls on the desk of the Speaker in the house of representatives before this or a similar bill is passed, that gavel will smite between the eyes the best welfare of this nation.

There are some facts that need to be hurled at the intelligent people of this country with the force of a catapult. They need to be roused and rallied, and then they will rouse and rally their representatives at Washington. There is a yawning indifference in regard to a most alarming state of things in this country.

Take the one ghastly and terrific fact that in this country, where the people rule, there are 6,000,000 who can neither read nor write---an increase of 2,000,000 in ten years.

Number of persons over ten years of age who cannot write: Iowa, 46,000; Wisconsin, 55,000; Michigan, 63,000; Arkansas, 102,000; Connecticut, 28,000; Kansas, 39,000; Minnesota, 34,000; Maryland, 134,000; Maine, 22,000; West Virginia, 85,000; New Jersey, 53,000; Florida, 80,000; Missouri, 208,000; New York, 219,000; Massachusetts, 93,000; Ohio, 131,000; Mississippi, 373,000; South Carolina, 309,000; Kentucky, 348,000; Alabama, 433,000; Louisiana, 318,000; North Carolina, 463,000; Georgia, 520,000.

Our compendium of the tenth census, though made up of hard statistics, is more overwhelming than "Paradise Lost," or Dante's "Inferno." The question now is, "What are you going to do with these 6,000,000 illiterates?" If you do not answer it aright, the question after awhile will be what 20,000,000 illiterate people will do with you.

A representative of North Carolina says that the number of people in that State who do not know the alphabet is larger than the number of votes ever polled for governor or President. The people who cannot read or write at this ratio will soon hold the balance of power in America. What an opportunity for demagogism! What a hot-bed for misrule! What a foundation for outlawry! What a prophet of national demolition!

Do yon say the State ought to look after its own illiterates? I reply many of the States are taxed now beyond their endurance. Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, and all the Southern States, have pushed taxation for school purposes to the last inch. In these efforts they have obliterated the color line, and give black and white equal advantage.

While Massachusetts devotes $1 to education on every $400 of property, South Carolina devotes $1 to free schools for every $250 of property, showing she is doing her best. Charleston pays on a ratio one-third more than Boston for educational purposes.

By the overthrow of slavery, millions of colored people who knew not their A B C's were given the right of suffrage. The nation set the blacks free without giving them qualification of citizenship, and many of the States have a load of ignorance they cannot lift, and they are crying out to the National Government to come to their rescue.

Can the tremendous surplus in the national treasury be devoted to any other object so laudable? Unless some such prompt and decisive step is taken for the education of the people, the American ballot-box will be a farce, exciting the derisive mirth of all nations.

Are you willing, O intelligent American citizen! to have continued and increased the disgraceful scene enacted at every autumnal election?

You have twenty, thirty years studying American institutions; you have canvassed all the great questions about tariff, about civil service reform, about Federal and State rights; and everything in American politics you are well acquainted with. You consider yourself competent to cast a vote in the city, State and Presidential elections, and you are competent. You will take your position in the line of electors, you will wait for your turn to come. The judge of election will announce your name. You will cast your vote and pass out. Well done! But right behind you will come a man who cannot spell the name of controller, mayor or aldermen. He cannot write, or he uses the small "i" for the personal pronoun. He could not tell you on which side of the Alleghany mountains Ohio is. Educated canary birds, educated horses know more than he. But he will cast his vote, and it will balance your vote. His ignorance is as mighty as your intelligence. That is not right. All men of fair minds will acknowledge that is not right.

Until a man can read the Declaration of American Independence, and know the difference between a republican form of government and a monarchy or a despotism, he is unfit to exercise the right of suffrage at any ballot-box between Key West and Alaska. Oh for the education of the ballot box! It is the ark of the American covenant, to be carried in front of the host. A very old box is the ballot box, and very sacred. It is one of the fastnesses [sic] of this nation. It is one of the corner stones of our government. It is older than the Constitution. It is our national safety. Tell me what will be the fate of the American ballot box, and I will tell you what will be the fate of this nation. For the protection and education of the ballot box and through it the permanence of American institutions, I make a solemn appeal. —T. D. Talmage

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. Elsie BRAGONIER, now the wife of William LOWRY, Jr., had a long legal siege with the Chicago and Alton company. Her first husband was killed while employed as a brakeman on the Alton road. She sued the company and a McLean county jury gave a verdict in her favor. The company appealed to the supreme court and had the verdict reversed on a mere technicality. Five times the case was tried in the lower courts, and on each trial Mrs. Bragonier got verdicts ranging from $5000 to $2500. Every time the supreme court upset the verdict, and at last that court has decided adversely to Mrs. Bragonier. The verdict of a petit jury does not stand much show in the higher courts against a wealthy corporation.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry WOY departed for their home in Kansas Tuesday.


Jeff STOREY is confined to his bed with lung fever.


Rev. PRICE is holding a series of meetings with good results.


Mrs. MURPHY, of Kansas, is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. TURNER.


Dr. V. DAVIS returned home from Beason this week.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

The Rev. W. A. HUNTER has been confined to his home by sickness this week.


Sheriff GARDINER and family will leave for California next Monday afternoon.


Bev. WAGGONER and wife started for Fresno, California, last Monday evening.


Mrs. B. C. MICHAELS is at Hannibal, Mo., undergoing a course of medical treatment.


Frank MAY, of Co. B, 107th Illinois Infantry, has lately been granted a pension of $2 a month.


On Tuesday Mr. C. F. AMSDEN started for Hot Springs, Ark., where he expects to remain six weeks.


Hebe MORSE this week contributed $25 and costs to the public exchequer for running a gambling house.


Mr. W. METZGER, cashier of the DeWitt County National Bank, is on the sick list and confined to his home.


Mrs. Ellis DAY was confined to her bed for more than a week by sickness. She is now on the convalescent list.


Mr. J. M. HARDIN has leased the Dr. GOODBRAKE property, and will move into it as soon as the weather moderates.


Mrs. C. FUNK is still in a very critical condition. Her son and daughter from Fort Worth, Texas, arrived here a day or two ago.


Col. SNELL arrived at home on Wednesday from Washington, having spent four weeks very pleasantly in the national capital.


Charles PEDDICORD died at his home in this city last Saturday morning. For more than two years he had been an invalid from consumption.


Mr. Joseph ARMSTRONG is confined to his home by severe sickness, and his friends feel that there are some doubts of the old gentleman's recovery.


The Young People's Society of the Presbyterian Church will meet at Mr. J. G. CACKLEY's residence on next Monday evening, at half-past seven o'clock.


Fred HARPSTER, Jr., is clerking in BOSSERMAN's drug store. Fred was brought up in the drug business, his father having owned a store in Wapella for a number of years.


Charley HANGER got home from Washington last Saturday. If the result of his visit to the national capital will prove as successful as he anticipates, Charley will be able to wear diamonds.


FREUDENSTEIN & Co. have made great improvements in the front of their building by tearing down the wooden awning in front of it. The store room will be brighter and more pleasant.


Milt COLWELL is one of the farmers who makes farming pay. He has only a small farm, yet this week he received $1050 cash for his hog crop and $250 for a fine driving mare. Besides these sales he has a large bunch of cattle which he is feeding or a late market.


The stock of the South Side Millinery Store, in the national bank block, was sold the other day to Mrs. W. F. BETTS, who will continue the business. Mrs. Betts has experience in the millinery art, and being a clever lady she will without doubt keep up the popularity of the South Side store.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

MR. GARDINER HAS NOT A WARM ATTACHMENT FOR HIS OLD DEPUTY.

For nearly six years Fine MORGAN served as chief deputy under Sheriff GARDINER. When Mr. Gardiner was elected four years ago last November, he did not want to occupy the jail with his family, so he made an arrangement with Finis that he should live in the jail and have the emoluments from boarding the prisoners, and that Finis was to pay the rental of a house for the sheriff. This was a good arrangement for Finis, as the boarding of the prisoners added to the $600 salary made him a good income. When the sheriff's term had expired Finis owed him $18.75 on the rent account, which Finis refused to pay. The sheriff was determined to have it, as he thought he had done the fair thing by his deputy. The result was, the sheriff sued for the amount. Mr. Gardiner having decided to go to California, he packed up his goods and had them ready to load in a car, when Finis sued an attachment against the goods and planted a suit for $300 against his old friend. Not satisfied with attaching the goods, Finis also levied on Mr. Gardiner's cash that was in WARNER's bank. Here was trouble at once. The suit could be deferred till the June term of the county court, and Mr. Gardiner's goods and money be held in bondage till that time unless Finis would agree to an immediate trial. At first he positively declined to show any favors to Mr. Gardiner, but finally he consented to release the goods and keep his legal grip on the money in the bank. But it would take too long to tell the whole story. Finis finally concluded to allow an immediate trial, which was had before Judge INGHAM and a jury on Wednesday. Finis claimed that as deputy sheriff he was entitled to all the fees for taking prisoners from this county to the penitentiary, and this was his basis for the $300 suit. As the sheriff had never made any such contract with him, it was not likely that he was going to accede to such a demand. The trial occupied several hours, but it did not take the jury long to decide on a verdict. The result was that a verdict was rendered against Finis for the $18.75 due for rent, and the attachment was quashed. Finis has all of the costs to pay, even to sheriff Gardiner's attorney fees.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HIS 'ART WAS SET ON ART.

Once upon a time, as the old-fashioned story writers used to open up with, and it was not many years ago either, there lived near Clinton a family of indigent circumstances. If there was a cupboard in the house, there was no necessity for it, for there was never anything left from one meal to the other. In one corner of the room there was a dingy-looking bed, with scant covering, in which lay a woman emaciated by sickness. Chairs or tables, there were none in the house, a few rough-looking benches answering for seats. The house was full of children, as is generally the case in the home of poverty. The husband and father—well we will not describe him—sat cowering over the fire that the children kept up by frequent visits to the woods close by, where they were allowed to gather the brush and broken limbs. The man might have worked and contributed to the support of his sick wife and his children, but his soul was above the base and menial; his mind soared higher than hog and hominy. We will not linger, but get down at once to the marrow of the story.

A kind-hearted neighbor felt much sympathy for the afflicted wife, and from her generous table went many a tid-bit to feed and comfort her. This lady had noticed the absence of furniture especially of chairs. To seat an invalid on a rough bench, without back or sides, is not a very comfortable position, so she sent from her home a rocking chair for the use of the sick woman. The frame of the chair was made of black walnut and it had a cane seat. No doubt the lady fancied the pleasure this would give her sick neighbor, and a few days afterward she went into see how she was enjoying the easy chair. There was no chair to be seen; the sick woman was sitting on one of the old stools. "Why don't you use the rocking chair I sent you?" asked the lady. With tears in her eyes, the invalid looked up in the face of her kind neighbor, and said: "My husband has taken it to make brackets. He is quite a genius in that line, and he said the black walnut would make such nice frames and brackets that it was a pity to leave it in a chair." The lady could not stay any longer; there was rebellion in her heart at the selfishness of a man who would rob his wife of the comfort of an easy chair for the sake of a few brackets and frames. She never sent anymore furniture to that house, and it was not long before the man was notified to secure another home for his family. The house belonged to the lady's husband.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 4, 1887 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

UNWRITTEN HISTORY OF THE WAR.

How a Squad of the Fourth Illinois Cavalry Got Out of a Bad Scrape
Mr. Editor —Something over twenty-two years has past and gone since the incident of which I am about to write occurred.

On the 22d day of June, 1864, our regiment, the 4th Illinois Cavalry (Dickey's regiment), was in camp at Natchez, Miss., and had been there for six months ere we had become acquainted with all the citizens in that region of the country. For miles around, and in rear of the city, we knew every foot of land. We had followed Grant from Cairo to Henry, Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, through Tennessee to Vicksburg, Black River, Raymond, then down the river to Natchez, from where, in November, 1864, we were sent to Springfield and mustered out of service.

We were attached to no particular brigade or corps. Company A of our regiment was Grant's body guard until after the fight at Shiloh, and perhaps longer, but as I am not writing a history of the 4th Illinois Cavalry, I will not pretend to tell the engagements they were in during the war.

In the spring of 1864 there was a great amount of cotton stored away in the swamps of Mississippi, and you all know it was very valuable. Speculators in Natchez were numerous, and would pay fabulous prices for guards to go out with their drays and bring in the precious article. We had on several occasions went out and brought in cotton without any trouble worth naming, and we considered that we were about as good commanders as Grant or anybody else. But, alas! How sadly mistaken were we. As soon as it required generalship, we failed to have it. We relied on bull-dog grit and got gloriously whipped, yet we fought nobly.

On the 22d day of June, 1864, memorable to a few boys in McLean, DeWitt, Piatt, and other parts of the country, a few members of Company L were in the city of Natchez and made a contract with a speculator to bring in fifty bales of cotton for $2500, to be paid for when the cotton was delivered. We went back to camp, and I laid the matter before Captain H. H. MERRIMAN, who peremptorily ordered me not to engage in anything of the kind, and if we did he would not be responsible. We paid no attention to this as our time would soon be out. We were without money, and $2500 would be a big thing to go home with, so we went to work to get the volunteers all from Company L. We intended to get twenty-five men, but failed. We only succeeded in getting nine, as follows: James THOMPSON, James MILLER, Ambrose STOREY, Henry BREWER, Thomas DAVIS, William DALE, Prentice WILLIAMS, William TAYLOR and myself. The speculator had told us it was only 17 miles to the cotton, but it turned out to be 27 miles, where a Federal soldier had never before trod. We ran the picket at sundown, the evening of the 22d, and about dusk started with the drays for the cotton. About half way out we stopped at a planter's house and met an Englishman from the city, whose name I have forgotten. He was a very strong sympathizer with the South, but claimed British protection. He had come to inform the rebels of our advance. We had a pleasant chat with them and passed on. We had not gone 200 yards when we were fired upon by three rebel bushwhackers, who we supposed had just left the planter's house. We ran them off and then held a consultation whether we should go back and take the Englishman prisoner, or kill him, but finally agreed to let him go and hurry on and get our cotton.

About two o'clock in the morning, away down in a swamp in the thickest of timber, we found the prize. We loaded in short notice and started for the city in high glee. I was first sergeant, and it was agreed that at sun-up I was to leave the cotton and go alone into camp and make out my morning report at nine o'clock to keep down suspicion. Myself and three others were riding in front of the drays. Just as the sun was peeping up we were talking about me starting ahead so as to arrive in time, thinking of course all danger was past.

Just then we came to a deep cut in the road, where we saw that something had been dragged along in the dust. This excited Comrade Dale, and he spurred his horse and galloped to the end of the cut, when these same three rebels raised and shot him down. This track in the dust was made by a negro, whom the rebs had killed that morning and thrown over the fence, and as soon as Dale stopped at the fence he was fired upon. As soon as the firing was heard, we galloped up and hastened the retreat of the rebels. We fired at them as they fled, and then turned around, picked up our poor dead comrade and laid him in the fence corner. William Dale was a good soldier, from Harp township, and, I think, a relative of the Harp family.

By this time the boys in the rear had all come up and began to scatter to the front. The negroes driving were hallowing and whooping, scared to death—and, Mr. Editor, your humble servant was scared just as badly. These three rebs ran about a mile and went in an old cotton gin that stood about fifty yards from the road. Seventeen rebels, commanded by a lieutenant, coming up the road and meeting us, also went into the old cotton gin, making 21 in all against our 8 men left. They stayed there until we passed, and then made a dash for us. We held them in check for a few moments with our carbines, but they kept coming. The negroes had all left the drays standing in the road and went to the woods. We saw there was no use to try to hold the cotton, although it was precious and hard to give up, so we wheeled and made the dust fly for a mile. We looked back, and O, God! they were about to catch us. What to do I certainly did not know. I wanted to pray, but did not have time.

My thoughts were not upward, but onward. Their horses were fresh; ours had been ridden all night, without feed, and were jaded. As we were approaching a small bridge in the road some one of the boys, I believe Sergeant Thompson, who now lives in McLean county, ordered us to wheel at the bridge, which we did. This brought us face [to face]—and what a sight! I wish I had my photograph then. I think I was of fair complexion. Talk about Donelson and Shiloh! Clover Hill discounts them all. Henry Brewer was shot through the heart just as he disabled the rebel lieutenant by striking him over the shoulder with his carbine. Prentiss Williams was shot through and through, and knocked from his horse. He walked into the woods, marked a sapling, buried his pocket-book, which contained $40 in greenbacks, started back to the road and fainted. He was found by the rebs, who took him to a house nearby and cared for him. The balance of his friends had gone, leaving in a hurry. They failed to follow us any farther; if they had they certainly would have gotten us. We scattered in every direction and went into camp. I was the first one, and when I approached our quarters I was reminded of the parable of the prodigal son.

Captain Merriman, seeing me afar off, but not in the beautiful language of the father to the son, desired to know "what in h--l was the matter?"

"Nothing," said I.
"D--n it, don't lie to me."

My countenance told my guilt and trouble. I thought I would be shot, and told him all. His comforting words were: "D--n you, I told you not to go," and a few more adjectives.

It was a little after nine o'clock when I got in, but I went and made out my report, reporting the dead and wounded, and absent without leave. This was Thursday morning, June 23d, and everything moved along nicely. My report went in every morning the same until Sunday, when the following order was sent to Captain Merriman. I have the original order, which reads as follows:

Headquarters Reg't., Cav., Ill. Vol.
Natchez, Miss., June 26, 1864

H. H. Merriman, Captain Co. L —You will at once place 1st Sergeant W. O. ROGERS, of your company, under arrest, confining him in his quarters, after which you will report in person to these headquarters.

By order of C. D. Townsend, Major commanding regiment
A. T. CHEGO, Adjutant

After Captain Merriman returned I was ordered under guard to Major C. D. TOWNSEND's headquarters. We had a half hour's consultation, the Major trying to get me to acknowledge my guilt and tell who was with me and who the speculator was that hired us to go. Failing in this, he sent an order to the Captain ordering the arrest of Taylor, Thompson, Davis, Storey and Miller.

That beautiful Sabbath morning I shall never forget. Instead of marching to church, as good soldiers should, we were marched under guard to the military prison in Natchez, there to remain until shot, or till the close of the war. I had been in guard houses before. Indeed I was acquainted with every guard house from Louisville, Ky., to Memphis, Tenn. Don't think I missed one, but never before had I looked through the iron bars. We sat down, played seven-up, enjoyed ourselves the best we could, and plotted to beat the officers by swearing to nothing—pleading ignorance, and in this we were successful. I could tell a great deal more, but have already taken up too much space.

W. O ROGERS,
1st Serg., Co. L, 4th Ill. Cav.

(See related article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The county clerk has just completed a tabular statement of the births, marriages and deaths in DeWitt county or the year 1886, for the State Board of Health. From it we gather that there were 277 births, 145 marriages, and 92 deaths. In the new population there were 140 males and 137 females, showing a slight preponderance of three in favor of the sterner sex. Of the deaths, 43 were males and 49 females. The youngest man married was twenty years of age, and the youngest woman was only fourteen. The oldest man married had reached the allotted year of threescore and ten, and the oldest woman was fifty-two years. When we consider that in a county of nearly 18,000 population there were only ninety-two deaths, it does not seem necessary to go elsewhere to seek a healthier climate.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

In the summary of the report by the county clerk to the State Board of Health, published last week, we omitted one important item. The number of deaths reported was ninety-two, of which forty-five were under twenty years of age. We have since looked over the report and find that eleven of the deaths were children under one year old; fifteen between the ages of one and five years; eight between the ages of five and ten years; five between the ages of ten and fifteen years; six between the ages of fifteen and twenty years; five between the ages of fifty and ninety years; and one over ninety years. The others ranged from twenty years and upward. There is one thing remarkable. During the past seven months there was not a single death in Nixon township.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. William FUNK will go to Decatur next week where he has secured a good position in the large dry goods house of LINN & SCRUGGS, at a liberal salary. THE PUBLIC regrets to see the young men of Clinton leave to find employment elsewhere. Mr. Funk was born in this city thirty-three years ago, and with the exception of four or five years has lived continuously here. He was a graduate from our public schools, and learned the mercantile business with the old firm of MAGILL Bros. For nearly nine years he was in the employ of that firm, and after the death of Mr. Henry MAGILL, Mr. Funk and Mr. AMSDEN bought the stock in 1883 and continued in business till a few weeks ago, when Mr. Funk sold his half interest in the stock to Mr. A. H. MAGILL. The Decatur firm is fortunate in securing the services of Mr. Funk, for he is a thorough business man and will take an interest in the welfare of his employers.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FELL AMONG THIEVES.

The Bloomington Leader tells of a young granger, by the name of J. W. TODD, who lives on a farm in this county, who went to that city last Saturday to observe the habits of the elephant and indulge in a season of hilarity. He fell in with three fellows who were willing to assist him in this laudable enterprise, and together they made the rounds of saloons and other resorts. About six o'clock in the evening Todd, according to his own story, was slightly under the influence of the god of wine, and his companions tolled him out back of the cemetery to a lonely place, where they struck him on the head with a sling-shot, rifled his pockets of $79 in cash, and left him insensible on the ground. How long he reposed on the damp earth—for it was raining at the time—he does not know, but thinks it was about eleven o'clock. His clothing was saturated with mud and water, his bones ached, and his head was sore. He dragged himself to a house not far away, made known his condition, and was cared for. The case was not reported to the Bloomington police until Sunday afternoon, when Todd went to the station. His description of the parties was very imperfect, and although the police searched diligently, they were unable to find parties filling the bill. It is thought they were strangers. Todd returned to his country home a wiser and sadder youth. He had fun enough to last him a year to come, and his face and head bore marks which will be unpleasant reminders of the adventure for some time to come.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A TERRIBLE DEATH
John
Tilman Lane Was Bitten by Dog and Died of Hydrophobia.

John Tilman LANE owned a farm about one mile and a half south of the village of DeWitt. Nine or ten weeks ago he was bitten in the left hand by his shepherd dog. The dog had acted strangely for a few days prior to that time and had snapped at a little girl, but did not bite her. Mr. Lane had chastised the dog that evening for not obeying orders when he was told to go to the pasture after the cows, and as the dog had a lame foot and seemed to be surly, Mr. Lane tied him up to keep him at home. While fastening the strap around the dog's neck he bit Mr. Lane in the hand and drew blood. The next morning when Mr. Lane went out to the barn he found the dog dead. This alarmed him on account of being bitten by the animal, and he went over to Lincoln to test the virtues of the mad stone. The theory of the mad stone is, we believe, that if there is any poison from the dog bite in the system that the stone will adhere to the wound and draw out the poisonous blood. As the stone did not adhere to his hand he came home feeling that there was no danger. The matter passed by for weeks; the wound in his hand had healed up; and Mr. Lane thought nothing more about it. Early last week he was in Clinton arranging with G. W. WOY for an auction sale of his farm stock and implements. Mr. Lane was on a trade for the sale of his farm, and as there was only $25 difference between him and the man he was trading with, he expected to close the trade, sell his stock, and quit farming for a time.

Last Thursday Mr. Lane was seized with severe pains in his left arm. The muscles twitched and swelled in hard bunches. As the left hand was the one that had been bitten by the dog he became alarmed and consulted his family physician. During the night he grew worse and was seized with terrible convulsions. It became necessary for his wife to summon the neighbors, as she could not manage him. Mr. Lane was in full possession of his mental faculties, but when these spasms came upon him, he could not control himself. Another physician was called in to advise as to a system of treatment, and every remedy was tested but of no avail. Each hour he grew worse, and it finally took four strong men to manage him when he was seized with the convulsions. Last Monday and Monday night his friends began to think that he was becoming insane. Insanity was hereditary in his family, as his father had been afflicted with it for years. The people in the neighborhood were afraid to remain in the house with him, and even his wife had fears for her personal safety. No one dreamed of hydrophobia in his case. The doctors decided that it would be safer to send him to an asylum for treatment, for they believed that he had become insane. All day Monday and Monday night the men who were watching him had more on their hands than they could manage, for Mr. Lane seemed to be imbued with the strength of a giant. During the night he broke away from his keepers, escaped from the house, and it was only after a hard chase that they succeeded in capturing him. When not under the power of the spasms, he was perfectly rational, and knew everything that was being done for him. He consented to come to Clinton in the hope that other treatment would relieve him of his sufferings.

On the early train on Tuesday morning, he was brought to Clinton. His attendants tied him securely to keep him from doing injury to himself or to them. They were fearful that in one of his paroxysms he might leap from the train and be either killed or injured. When he was brought to the jail in a carriage from the train, he recognized Sheriff Henson and greeted him as rationally as he ever did. The sheriff put him in the corridor of the jail till such time as the county Judge empanelled to try the issue of insanity. In a few minutes afterward, the sheriff took him in his breakfast, but as Lane appeared to be drowsy, one of his DeWitt friends suggested that it would be better to let him sleep, as he needed rest, and a nap would do him more good than eating. The sheriff then ate his own breakfast, and before he came up town to see about summoning a jury to try the case, he looked in upon Lane and saw that he was still in the same position on the chair and perfectly motionless. The sheriff then thought he was dead, but the others insisted that he was still breathing and asleep. Sheriff Henson came up town, but the impression was so strong upon him that Lane was dead that he immediately returned to the jail. He laid his hand upon him to arouse him and found that he was rigid in death. The sheriff was then satisfied that Lane had died a few minutes after he was brought to the jail.

Later in the day the coroner held an inquest. The physicians from DeWitt were summoned to appear, and three physicians in this city were examined. The jury returned a verdict that John Tilman Lane had come to his death from hydrophobia.

John Tilman Lane was born in Creek township, in this county, and was about thirty-three years old. His father is Jerry LANE, and he was a nephew of the Hon. T. LANE. For a number of years John Tilman made his home with his uncle. Between three and four years ago he bought a small farm near the village of DeWitt, on which he prospered. He was a genial soul, and always had a kind word and a smile for every one he met. He married a daughter of Mr. Pat McMANN. They had no children. He was buried on Wednesday afternoon in the Rose Cemetery, in Creek township.

(see next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Under the direction of Mayor BISHOP the city marshal has had printed the ordinance passed in May, 1875, in relation to dogs. The ordinance has been a dead letter for ten years, and now the city authorities propose to give it new life and enforce it. Owners of dogs are compelled to pay a tax on each one they own and in addition put a collar on the dog with a tab showing that the license has been paid. All dogs not wearing the collar and tab will be killed by the marshal. Clinton is full of worthless curs and a general slaughter would be a benefit. Anyone who owns a good dog will be willing to pay the tax for the sake of ridding the city of the curs.


Collar your dog and pay the tax if you want to save him from the murderous pop of the city marshal. Collarless dogs must go.


Dog collars at D. C. JONES'.


The dog ordinance has been successful in its results. On Saturday morning there was a brisk demand for dog collars, and by Tuesday night twenty-seven permits were issued to owners of dogs. Those who have not taken out a license have tied their dogs up, so that a dog on the street without a collar and a license tab is a rare sight. Up to Tuesday night, the marshal had killed twenty-two dogs and decently interred them in the new dog cemetery.

Note: This was probably triggered by John T. LANE's death from hydrophobia, which was reported on Feb. 11th. [See next clipping on J. T. Lane]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

J. S. SHAW, superintendent of water tanks and pumping machinery on the Illinois Central road, met with a terrible accident this morning in the machine shops. He was attending to the melting of a pot of Babbitt metal when from some cause the boiling mass exploded, scattering in every direction. Some of the metal went into both of Mr. Shaw's eyes and both of his arms were badly burned. Dr. GOODBRAKE, the company's surgeon, hopes to save Mr. Shaw's eyes from blindness, but it will be a close shave. Mr. Shaw lives in Kankakee. J. S. McCOID, who was assisting Mr. Shaw, was slightly burned.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

PLAYING IT ON HIS WIFE.

The other evening a citizen of Clinton took his little boy on his knee, kissed him and gave him a dime, and then told him that would be the last he would see of his papa. He then tragically whetted up a knife, and strode into the bedroom, telling his wife that the next time she would see him he would be "demnition [sic] moist body." Out ran the wife in the street to alarm the neighbors and one responded to her call. The man refused to go into the house unless the woman would accompany him. He expected to find the corpse of his neighbor weltering in blood, and when he burst open the bedroom door, there was the supposed suicide kicking his heels up in the air and roaring with laughter at what he thought was a good joke on his wife.

Note: Sounds like another good candidate for the asylum.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Jake VOGEL having sold a large part of his farm, and as he intends to move to California in the near future, he is going to sell all of his cattle, horses, hogs, farming machinery, etc. The sale will be on his farm, three miles north of Clinton, on Monday, February 21. Mr. Vogel took great pride in owning the finest stock in the county, so that what he has to sell will be worthy of the attention of farmers wanting the best. He has seven Norman and one Clyde brood mares, from three to six years old, nearly all in foal; three Norman colts, and a fine team of work horses. He has also forty-two high grade cattle, of which are eighteen two-year-old steers, ten milch cows, four heifers in calf, nine spring calves, a two-year-old thoroughbred shorthorn bull; fourteen full-blood Jersey Red brood sows, ten shoats, and a lot of farming implements.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

O. J. WOODWARD came near meeting with a serious accident last Tuesday evening. While driving up to the hotel at Fowler, about dark, his buggy top caught in a clothes line, which from the force brought against it, broke or pulled from the ground the stakes which held it. One of these struck Mr. Woodward in the back of the head, knocking him senseless and causing him to fall from his buggy. His leg and shoulder were bruised up, and he received a slight hurt on the head. The team was frightened and ran for a short distance, but was soon stopped. The good people of Fowler should learn to hang these things a little higher when there is a Fresno real estate agent around. —Fresno (Cal.) Democrat

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Miss Nora CRANG is visiting in Lincoln.


Mr. Drew INMAN was in Chicago this week buying new goods.


Mr. A. L. WARNER is attending to some business affairs in Michigan.


Major WARNER was out in Iowa this week attending to legal matters.


Mrs. Morris STURM is in Chicago visiting the family of Mr. Henry KATZ.


Colonel SNELL went to Chicago on Wednesday to take lessons in voice culture.


Mr. W. METZGER is still confined to his home, but he expects to be down town in a day or two.


Tom BRYANT, the deputy sheriff, has been confined to his home for the past three weeks with rheumatism.


Another big drop in watches. A good watch is now within reach of all. Go to J. H. SCHMITH's


Mr. Wm. FULLER was over in Monticello this week attending to a partition case in the circuit court for one of his clients.


The mud is so deep that it is almost impossible for a team to haul even an empty wagon, consequently very few farmers have been in town during the past week.


The best business nowadays is that of an auctioneer. Wash WOY has sixteen public sales for the month of February, and already two engagements for March.


Miss Tot McMURRY, of Farmer City, was the guest of Mrs. W. COLLYER this week. Miss McMurry was the attraction at several little parties made to compliment her.


Ed COLLYER is expected in Clinton next week. When he returns to his home in Kansas he will not go alone for one of Farmer City's fairest daughters will accompany him.


This has been a week of rain and sunshine—but more rain than shine. The frost is about all out of the earth. There is no kicking now about scarcity of water in stock wells or creeks.


The merchants are taking advantage of the dull times to fix up their stores for spring and summer trade. Mr. MILLER is having the interior of his store painted and calcimined, and FREUDENSTEIN & Co. are doing likewise.


G. E. HAINES has opened a bakery in connection with his restaurant. He has engaged the services of a first-class baker, and guarantees his patrons the best of fresh bread, pies and cakes every day.


When Col. SNELL came home from Washington last week, he brought Louis BEHRING a very fine meerschaum pipe. Old Louis is very proud of it and has it carefully wrapped in chamois leather so as to keep it from being scratched.


On account of last Tuesday being a stormy day, J. M. SHAW's cattle sale will be postponed till next Monday. There will be eighty high-grade cattle offered for sale and some thoroughbred hogs. Anyone wanting good stock should avail themselves of this opportunity.


They had a fire over in Monticello last Saturday in which a building was burned that was built for a Methodist Church forty years ago, when the Rev. J. C. RUCKER had charge of that circuit. The church had degenerated into a store room and paint shop.


J. S. WILSON has been out of business so long that he is getting tired of a life of leisure. He is now fitting up his old room on the northeast corner of the square for a refreshment room and bakery. Andy GAYHAGAN will be a partner in the business.


J. H. STAFFORD, who lives on one of Miss Nellie MAGILL's farms, in Texas township, sold to N. R. PERSINGER, this week, sixty last May pigs that averaged 271 lbs. each, for which he received $450 per hundred. The hog business is a profitable crop just now.


Old soldiers in this county who want to apply for admission to the Soldiers' Home at Quincy should report at once to the county clerk. The Home will be ready by the first of March, and to secure admission the applicant will have to furnish a complete record of his army life.


When Mr. Thomas GARDINER and his family were leaving Clinton last Monday evening for California, a large number was at the depot to bid them good-by. Some of the ex-sheriff's friends, of all parties, presented him with a couple of boxes of the best cigars over which to dream while on his long journey.


Yesterday afternoon, at the residence of Mr. Henry ZIEGLER, at the Weldon farm, a large company of relatives and friends gathered to witness the marriage ceremony which united Miss Rose ZIEGLER to Mr. Samuel McFAIL. The bridegroom is an employee of the Illinois Central road. THE PUBLIC hopes for the young couple long life and happiness.


A great many people, says the Inter-Ocean, make the mistake in regarding "the home" as the house they live in. Now a house may be ever so costly and luxurious and contain very few of the qualities which endear the place to the occupants. To be a home in its truest sense, love and peace and the thousand little nameless attendants upon love must abide there. It is thus that often the poor cottage is more of a "a home" than a palace.


C. J. SEABORG tried to buy an eligible lot near the square on which to build a brick carriage shop large enough for his increasing business. The owner of the lot probably thought there was going to be a boom in real estate in town, so he put the price so high that Seaborg did not feel equal to the task of climbing up to it. Seaborg had to abandon his ideas of a shop near the square, and is now building an addition to his old shops opposite the Methodist Church.


Mr. J. McHUGH, a conductor on the Illinois Central road, whose home is in this city, received a telegram from Hot Springs, Ark., announcing the death of his brother, Thomas F. McHUGH. The deceased left Clinton last September for Hot Springs, hoping that a change would benefit him. During the war, Thomas McHugh clerked in GORMAN's grocery in this city, but for the past nineteen years was engaged in railroading. He ran a construction train on the Gilman, Clinton and Springfield road when it was being built.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Don ROBBINS was elected police magistrate in the village of DeWitt last April, at the spring election. The law requires that the officer must file his bond within twenty days after election. This Don neglected to do, but a week or two ago he sent in his bond to the county clerk, which was forwarded to the Secretary of State. That officer returned the bond, stating that Don was too late in qualifying. So Don cannot exercise the judicial office till he is again elected.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WANTS TO PROTECT HIS BOY.

The law in relation to selling liquor to minors is very stringent, and there is a heavy penalty for its violation. Occasionally minors, who in appearance would be taken for men over twenty-one years of age, get liquor and no questions are asked; but when the saloon-keeper is not certain he should closely investigate before he deals out the deadly stuff. Save the boys, and if they must become drunkards, let them do it on their own responsibility after they arrive at man's estate. At the December term of the circuit court, a farmer living a few miles from Clinton presented before the grand jury the names of four saloon-keepers in this city who had sold his son, a minor, intoxicating liquor. For some reason, the grand jury paid no attention to the case. The father then had the State's attorney bring the matter before the county court on "information." The saloon-keepers were cited to appear before Judge INGHAM. Three of them pleaded guilty and were fined $20 each and costs. The fourth was determined to fight his case, and it will probably be tried in the county court next Monday.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DEWITT.

A grand boom in all kinds of business. Booms are a grand rarity here.


The community is considerably excited over the sudden and almost tragic death of our most respected citizen, J. T. LANE, who was bitten by his own dog during the latter part of last November. The particulars are so well known that further notice is unnecessary. Suffice to say that one and all deeply feel his death, and the deepest sympathy prevails for his wife in her deep affliction.


There has been a great deal of sickness in this vicinity during the winter, mostly among children.


Mrs. Eliza WATT, a very elderly lady and one of our oldest citizens, is still at death's door. We notice a great many relatives of the family in the city.


E. R. BAY's little girl, Creola, is rapidly recovering.


Mr. BAY starts for his claim in western Kansas soon. We wish him success.


We understand that J. J. SUTTON, our genial grocer and hardware man, will soon receive two or three car loads of agricultural implements, which with his full fresh stock of groceries and hardware sold at the lowest price for cash, will make it worth your while to give him a call. If you don't need anything in his line, call anyhow, and Jim will give you anything from a boxing match to a game of marbles.


We notice on the streets the familiar faces of John and Charley WALTON. They are visiting their mother.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAYNESVILLE.

Mrs. M. SHIPLEY is seriously ill.


George PARKER's little girl is quite sick.


Born, February 5th, a son to Mr. and Mrs. James UPTON.


John GRAY returned to Beason Tuesday.


Born, to Mr. and Mrs. W. BAYLESS, a son.


John SMITH, of McLean, was here Saturday.


A. R. CUNNINGHAM's child is some better.


One more is added to George WINKLE's family last Thursday. It is a boy.


J. M. JONES and John BAKER were in Atlanta Wednesday.


Mrs. George GAMBREL is seriously afflicted with sore throat.


Rev. FARREE is meeting with grand success in his meeting at Tabor.


Misses M. COOK and Grace FULLENWIDER went to Atlanta Tuesday.


George GRAY returned from Illiopolis the first of the week.


At Wm. STONE's sale Saturday, horses brought a fair price.


Wm. HARRIS's son is recovering from his recent sickness.


Miss BELL returned to her home in Champaign February 3d.


John GROVES has returned to his home in Ohio.


Mr. McCOY is loading his car this week. He will go to Southern Kansas.


Rev. SMITH, of Hopedale, is assisting Rev. FOWLER in his revival meeting this week.


George HOOVER has purchased Jas. UPTON's farm. Mr. Hoover will move to the ONSTOTT place and farm for Mr. FINFROCK.


A continued rain which lasted until Tuesday filled the wells to some extent. At present the weather is good, but the roads are almost impassable.


Mr. KAUFMAN, who has been in Nebraska for the past four years working on the B. & M. railroad, is here visiting relatives and acquaintances.


Mr. H. C. HOUCHINS will offer his property at public sale Saturday, January 12th. It is understood he will remove to Hopedale, where he will enter the ministry. Jos. EBERMAN will occupy Mr. Houchins' farm.


Franklin E. DUNHAM, of this place, and Miss Addie B. CONKLIN, of Atlanta, were united in marriage at the residence of Chas. CONKLIN, brother of the bride, in Atlanta, Tuesday, February 5th, Rev. THOMAS officiating. We offer congratulations.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

BARGAIN IN MUSIC.

This Favorite Album of Songs and Ballads, containing thirty-two pieces of choice and popular music, full sheet-music size, with complete words and music and piano accompaniments, is finely printed upon heavy paper with a very attractive cover. The following titles of the songs and ballads contained in the Favorite Album: As I'd Nothing Else to Do; The Dear Old Songs of Home; Mother, Watch the Little Feet; Oh, You Pretty Blue-eyed Witch; Blue Eyes; Katy's Letter; The Passing Bell; I Saw Esau Kissing Kate; Won't You Tell Me Why, Robin; The Old Garden Gate; Down Below the Waving Lindens; Faded Leaves; All Among the Summer Roses; Touch the Harp Gently, My Pretty Louise; I Really Don't Think I Shall Marry; Dreaming of Home; The Old Cottage Clock; Across the Sea; A Year Ago; Bachelor's Hall; Ruth and I; Good Night; One Happy Year Ago; Jennie in the Orchard; The Old Barn Gate; Jack's Farewell; Polly; Whisper in the Twilight. [Only 28 are listed.] This is a very fine collection of real vocal gems, and gotten up in very handsome style. Published in the usual way and bought at a music store, these 32 pieces would cost you $11.20. We bought a job lot of this music at a great sacrifice and as the holidays are past we desire to close our stock at once. Will send you the entire collection well-wrapped and postpaid for only 40 cents. Send immediately. Address, The Empire News Co., Syracuse, N. Y.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

Mr. Jeff STOREY died Thursday night and was buried at Heyworth Saturday. Rev. PRICE preached his funeral. Comrade STOREY desires us to say to the friends that he returns his thanks to all who assisted in the burial and care of his son.


J. B. LIGHTHALL tenders his thanks through THE PUBLIC for their kindness through his afflictions.


Mr. S. TURNER has cut down the trees around his place, which has improved the looks very much.


Mr. CRUM has rented the IVES farm to Mr. JEFFREY.


Miss Mary CONBOY is to be married to John RYAN next Wednesday, at the Catholic Church.


Mr. A. J. LATIMER is very sick.


Mrs. J. H. LIGHTHALL is confined to her bed with lung fever.


Collector J. H. CRUM is desirous of seeing more of the taxpayers. Come in, as his time is getting short for collecting.


Mr. BOGARDUS, of Champaign, is visiting Mr. and Mrs. PRICE this week.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Mr. G. KATE has gone to market for the purpose of purchasing spring stock.


W. H. SHELLEY, a farmer, living near Farmer City, had a valuable horse stolen from his stable last Saturday night.


Mrs. J. R. JONES, who came to Clinton to visit her mother, Mrs. C. FUNK, returned to her home in Fort Worth, Texas, yesterday.


Tom EDMISTON returned to his home at Elk Horn, Neb., last Monday. He spent several weeks here with his mother and sister.


Charles CHEEK, a young man residing at Beason, fell from a car on the Illinois Central road at that place yesterday and was instantly killed.


Miss Vina WEIDLEIN returned to her home in Geneseo the early part of the week, after spending a few days with the family of Dr. CALHOUN.


Mr. S. M. THORP returns to his cattle ranch this week. He will be accompanied by Mr. W. R. CARLE, who is a member of the ranch company.


Mr. Fred L. HARPSTER and Major WARNER were in Rock Island this week, representing Frank Lowry Post at the annual department meeting of the G. A. R. of Illinois.


Mr. Samuel MONLUX and wife and their son Bertie started for Zanesville, Ohio, last Monday to visit Mr. Monlux's mother. They will remain at Zanesville a couple of weeks.


At the home of Mr. J. H. MILLS, on Wednesday evening, February 16th, Mr. J. Howard McKINNEY and Miss Lora MILLS, both of Barnett, were united in marriage by Rev. W. A. HUNTER.


Dr. J. H. AXTON, an old resident of our neighboring town, Maroa, died last Saturday in Bloomington, aged fifty-nine years. About a year ago the Doctor moved his family to Bloomington.


Dr. Alf. HYDE returned to his home in Dakota the other day, having spent a couple of weeks here looking after his father's medical practice, while the old Doctor was unable to attend to business on account of his broken ankle.


The Fresno (Cal.) Democrat of the 11th inst. announces the arrival in that town of Bev. WAGGONER and wife from Clinton, and Mr. OWENS from Farmer City. Mr. Thomas GARDINER and family were expected to arrive within a day or two.


Mr. SCOTT, of Weldon, was in town the other day in a peck of trouble. When he left home that morning he had in his pocket an envelope containing $3000 in notes, and when he came to look for them the package was gone. Has he found them yet?


Mr. E. FREDERICKSON came to Clinton this week to visit Mr. and Mrs. Reuben SACKETT and to take his wife and boy back to their home in Nebraska. "Fred" is a station agent on the Union Pacific railroad, about thirty-five miles from Lincoln, Neb., and has charge of the offices and freight yards, with twelve men under him.


Lew WATTS kept open house this week for a couple of days, and supplied all the visitors to his store with hot coffee and rolls. The chef d'cuisine was an agent for a baking powder that Watts is selling. Judging from the crowds that were in the store from early morn till closing time at night, the hot rolls and coffee must have been appetizing.


In the presence of a few intimate friends and relatives, Miss Kitty MARLATT, niece of Dr. CALHOUN, was united in marriage to Mr. W. E. WEIDLEIN, of Geneseo, Ill., on last Tuesday afternoon, Rev. W. S. CALHOUN, of Barry, Ill., officiating. They received quite a number of valuable presents. They went to Springfield and after remaining there a short time left for Geneseo, where they will make their future home.


Lew HUNTER came home this week from Philadelphia, where he spent on term as a student in the leading dental college of this country. While Lew was in the mail service he devoted his leisure hours for a couple of years to the study of denistry in the office of CALHOUN & SAWHILL. He has one more year to serve as an apprentice when he will graduate as a full-fledged dentist. Lew can do better work today than one-half the dentists in the state, and the experience he will get in the office of his preceptors will fit him for the profession.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

MAKING HIS WAY UPWARD.

It is a pleasure to THE PUBLIC to note the advancement of the Clinton boys who have gone out into the world to seek their fortune. Once or twice before we have had occasion to speak of L. F. DAY, and each time it was to tell of his making another step higher in the business world. For a number of years, Mr. Day was deputy postmaster in this city, he having entered the office after he graduated from the high school. While engaged in his duties as clerk, he make good use of his spare moments in studying the rudiments of stenography, and afterward he devoted nearly two years to mastering the art. About six years ago he left Clinton and went to Kansas City in the hope of finding employment as a reporter in the courts in that city, but was not successful. During the time he remained in Kansas City he barely made expenses. There were more stenographers there than cases to report. While in Kansas City he attracted the attention of the superintendent of the Hannibal and St. Joe Railroad, and was employed by him as his private secretary. Mr. Day's knowledge of stenography secured him this position. He remained at Hannibal for a little over two years when he was offered the position of private secretary of the general manager of Wells Fargo & Co.'s express company, with headquarters at San Francisco. It was a tempting position, with increased salary, and Mr. Day promptly accepted it. Mr. Day remained in San Francisco for nearly two years; but as his preferences were for railroad work, he did not take kindly to the express business. His old friend who was superintendent of the Hannibal and St. Joe road, was by this time appointed general manager of the Texas, St. Louis and Arkansas railroad, which is known as the great Cotton Belt route, operating about one thousand miles of road, and he kindly remembered Mr. Day and tendered him a position which was at once accepted. From private secretary to the general freight agent of the Texas, St. Louis and Arkansas road, Mr. Day has gradually worked his way, step by step, till last week he was promoted to the prominent position of assistant general freight agent of the entire line of road, with headquarters at Texarkana, Arkansas. By patient industry and careful attention to his duties he rose from one responsible position to another. This is doing pretty well for a young man who had no influential friends to help him beyond those he had made for himself. Six years ago it was hard scratching for Mr. Day to make more than a bare living. Now he is a responsible officer in a company operating one thousand miles of road.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Jacob HAMAN is mad. When you get a Dutchman mad he is mad all over, from the crown of his head to the soles of his feet. When Clark HOWARD lost his stock by the burning of the barn on John G. DAVIS's farm, Jake Haman went around with a subscription paper and raised $54.60 for the benefit of Howard. Jake was security for Howard for $36, and the other day he had to pay it. Now Jake thinks that is a little too much for him to stand, and he has written a letter, which will be found in today's PUBLIC.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


A CARD OF THANKS.

I desire to return thanks to all who so kindly aided me in the subscription for the benefit of Mr. Clark HOWARD. The sum raised was $54.60. The thanks that I got for my trouble was to pay a security debt of $36 for Mr. Howard.

Yours respectfully, Jacob HAMAN.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

O. C. CARLE, a brother of Cy. CARLE, lived in Wapella until about twelve years ago, and then he went to Pennsylvania, got married, and lived there till the year 1880, when he moved to Kansas City and bought a farm of one hundred and seventeen acres within four and a half miles of the center of the city. Even as late as seven years ago, land outside of the limits of Kansas City was not held at a very high price, for Mr. Carle paid less than $39 an acre for his farm, the purchase price being only $4500. About a year ago, Mr. Carle sold forty acres of his land for $30,000 cash, and now he is offered $2000 an acre for the remainder. He wants $2500 and acre and will get it. Mr. Carle has gone to Pasadena, near Los Angeles, California, where he intends to live in elegant comfort on the proceeds of his $4500 investment made near Kansas City less than seven years ago. It is better to be born lucky than rich.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE FIGHT AT LANNIGAN'S BALL.

"On with the dance, let joy be unconfined," is the motto over in Georgetown. During the past few weeks there has been on grand round of festivity at the widow JONES'. Once a week at least there has been a ball, and at every ball more or less knock-downs and drag-outs. On last Monday night there was a choice gathering of the chivalry and beauty, of a certain kind. A farmer who lives west of town and Steve LEWIS were there. Jimmy CARROLL did not like the actions of either of them, and he concluded to put them through a little thumping process. He thumped the farmer because he thought he ought to have been at home with his wife and seven children instead of cutting pigeon wings with grass widows. Jimmy gave both Steve and the farmer a couple of black eyes, and for this the farmer had him arrested. Before Judge McHENRY, on Tuesday morning, Jimmy acknowledged his sins of commission, and to help the treasury of the city the Judge charged up a fine of $10 and the costs against Jimmy, which was promptly paid in cash. The decent people over in Georgetown are scandalized at the gang that have made that part of the town a disgrace to civilization.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 18, 1887 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THIS BEATS ANY MEAN TRICK ON RECORD.

Four years ago, Mr. George HARTSOCK made two fish ponds near his house, on his farm, and had them well-stocked with fish. He took great pride in his ponds, as they were an ornament to his farm, and he watched with pleasure the growth of the fish. To keep an abundant supply of fresh water in the ponds, he went to considerable expense to run several springs into them. The other morning when he went out to take a look at the ponds, he found one of them dry, and not a fish in it. During the night someone had cut through the embankment and drained off every drop of the water and then gathered up the fish. Not even a minnow was left in the pond. Whether the act was one of mischievous jealousy or a desire to steal the fish, Mr. Hartsock cannot determine. He offers a reward of fifty dollars for the arrest and conviction of the perpetrators of the outrage.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HOT SPRINGS.

Mr. Charles F. AMSDEN has been at Hot Springs, Ark., for the past three weeks, and this week Mrs. AMSDEN went down to see how her invalid husband was getting along under the influences of hot water. Mr. Amsden has written a letter to a friend in this city, in which he gives some idea of Hot Springs and its surroundings. To begin with, he tells of the fabulous fortunes made by the doctors, one practitioner alone clearing $40,000 last year, and the income of another firm figuring up to $67,000. Hot Springs must be a perfect paradise for doctors when it is considered that every patient has to pay cash and no grumbling at the size of his bills. The doctor must be an independent set, for they don't even have to take the trouble to sit erect when questioning a patient, but lazily recline on a lounge. It generally takes about one minute to catechize a patient, in about this way:

Doctor---Well, how do you feel?
Patient---About the same.
Doctor---All right. Keep on with the bath at 98 and take thirty-five drops of nerve medicine as usual. Good morning.

The patient bows himself out of the august presence of his doctor, and another victim enters to answer the same list of stereotyped questions.

Board ranges in price from $25 to $3.50 a week, the victim paying his money and taking his choice. These are the rates that prevail at the highest and lowest class of houses. Good board and fair accommodations, however, can be had at $10 a week. The landlords are not very ceremonious with their guests, for the number of visitors to the Springs is generally beyond the capacity of the houses to entertain them. Real estate is valuable in the town, Mr. Amsden having attended a public sale where a business lot was sold at $640 a front foot, and it was considered dirt cheap. Mr. Amsden says that the town has improved wonderfully within the past three years. The army and navy buildings, which are being erected by the government, will soon be ready for occupancy. Congress has appropriated $38,000 for beautifying the grounds. Six coach loads of people arrive at the Springs every day, and invalids are there from all parts of the world. Mr. Amsden gives a favorable report of his condition and he thinks he has been greatly benefited in health by his visit to the Springs.

Note: This is a strange story. Amsden was a young man, only 31 years old when this was written, married five years. Two months after this article was written, he was declared insane and sent to an asylum, and by the end of the year he was dead.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. J. T. JONES, a native of DeWitt county who went to Welch, Missouri, more than twelve years ago, came back yesterday on his first visit to his old home. He is a son-in-law of Mr. Eli HARROLD, of Wapella. Mr. Jones was born in this county, and was the son of Uncle Billy JONES, one of the settlers before the deep snow. Uncle Billy received the fist marriage license from this county. Miss Edith, a daughter of Mr. J. T. Jones, has been staying with her grandparents for several months, and her father has now come to take her back to Missouri.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Leonard BROOKS was unfortunate last Monday morning. While helping to unload car wheels at the Central machine shops a pair of wheels ran down too fast off the platform car and threw Leonard down. His right hand caught under the flange of the wheel and was so badly mashed that it will be a long time, if ever, before he will have the use of it. Leonard has a large family depending on his earnings, and it will go hard with him and them. He is an old soldier, having served over three years during the last war, and he has been suffering from disability ever since his discharge from the service. He is an applicant for a pension, but from some cause has not been successful in making up the necessary proof. His would be a good case under the pension bill recently vetoed by the President.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. R. A. LEMON is out in the wilds of Texas on a business tour. The other night, during a slight Texas zephyr, the engine of the train on which he was traveling was blown from the track and a couple of cars went over with it. Mr. Lemon was in the rear sleeping coach asleep, and knew nothing of the accident till the next morning when he awoke expecting to be at the end of his journey. There he was out on the vast prairie, far from any habitation, and with no prospect for breakfast till the track could be cleared and a new engine come to their relief.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Charley HANGER has returned from a visit to Iowa.


Mrs. Cyrus FUNK does not improve, and there is a danger that she will not recover. [see obituary]


Cyrus JONES got another lift in his pension this week. His rate was raised from $8 to $12 a month.


Judge TIPTON spent several days in Clinton this week, taking testimony before the master in chancery.


Mrs. George GRAY, of Bloomington, has been the guest of her aunt, Mrs. R. BUTLER, during this week.


Pete CONKLIN is out in Fresno, California, and is negotiating for the purchase of six hundred acres of land.


Messrs. FULLER & MONSON are in Havana this week defending Watson NEWBERRY, formerly of this county, who is on trial on the charge of murder.


Frank SIEGFRIED, a wagon maker who lived in Clinton several years ago, was sent to the insane asylum last week from his home in Wenona, Illinois.


Alaska H. SMITH, of Hallsville, sold his high grade Norman Stallion, Grandview, Jr., to Mr. PEARSON, of Paris, Illinois, for five hundred dollars spot cash.


Mr. S. M. HENDRICK was about fifty dollars poorer the other morning than he was the night before. A fine three-year-old steer, weighing on thousand pounds, caught his horns in the manger, and in endeavoring to get free, strangled and died.


Mayor BISHOP was called to Elgin, Ill., last Friday, by a telegram announcing the serious illness of his brother. He returned Wednesday, bringing his niece with him. His brother was somewhat better, and all present danger seemed to be past.


Frank N. COLLINS, son-in-law of Mr. R. W. McCLELLAND, died recently at his home in Detroit, Mich. He was the proprietor of a drug store and was doing a good business. Two or three years ago Mr. Collins tried to buy a drug store in this city, but could not get the location he wanted.


Mr. J. S. WILSON this week sold his building lot on the north side of the square, next to Kelly Bros. restaurant, for $3000. As there is only twenty feet frontage to the lot, this was at the rate of $150 per foot—a pretty stiff price for property in a town of three thousand inhabitants.


 

It was at first thought that the party or parties who opened Mr. HARTSOCK's fish pond on the 11th inst. were parties living out near Salt Creek, but it has since been ascertained, almost beyond a doubt, that they live in Clinton—in that portion of the town commonly known as Ricksville. It is hoped that the parties will soon be brought to justice.


Willie HILL, son of R. P. HILL, has been living on a farm near Juniata, Neb., for the past year, and a few weeks ago he came home on a visit. While here his brother Joseph concluded to return with him, and they started for the West yesterday afternoon. They took with them four horses and a lot of stock hogs.


Charles E. BARRETT, a traveler for a Peoria wholesale grocery in Peoria who used to make regular business trips to this city, was convicted the other day of embezzlement and sent to the penitentiary for one year. He was the son of the Rev. George J. BARRETT, a prominent Methodist preacher in the Illinois conference, who died some time ago.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAYNESVILLE.

W. P. GAMBREL was here Monday.


James SELBY has returned home.


Wiley MARVEL is at Hot Springs.


Mrs. Benj. HAMMETT is on the sick list.


F. UPTON and sister were in Atlanta Tuesday.


Mrs. HOUSER returned to Lincoln Monday.


Rev. FARREE is visiting in Quincy.


C. H. JONES and his wife were here Monday.


Dr. SLACK has moved into the property vacated by Richard PARKER.


Mrs. F. V. WESTFALL started to Ohio Tuesday on a visit to relatives.


B. F. CULP and George FAUT have moved their barber shop to Kenney where in the future they will hold forth.


George SNOOK had a sale Friday.


On Monday evening, February 21st, in the city of Atlanta, occurred the marriage of Mr. Ed. STEVENS, of McLean, to Miss Lilly ATCHINSON, of Waynesville. The contracting parties are well known young people, and we wish them a long, happy life.


Aunt Kitty WILLIAMS met with quite a serious accident Wednesday of last week by falling into the cellar at the residence of her son. Fortunately no bones were broken and she is improving rapidly.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Rev. T. I. COULTAS, of Decatur, was invited out to St. Paul, Minn., to preach last Sunday, and so well pleased was the congregation with his ability as pulpit orator that the church invited him to the pastorate at a very comfortable salary. Mr. Coultas has taken the matter under advisement, and present indications would point to his acceptance of the call. Wesley LEAVITT is a member of the St. Paul church, and it was through him the congregation invited Mr. Coultas out there last Sunday.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Asa WILSON, of El Dorado, Kan., has been visiting his old home in DeWitt for the past three weeks, and last evening took the train for El Dorado. He has not found a better country then Illinois, nor does farming pay as well in his neighborhood as in DeWitt county. Land is nearly as high in price and will not produce as many bushels to the acre. He thinks that the farmer who owns land here had better think twice before he sells to go west.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

This week Dr. GOODBRAKE sold his homestead to Mr. A. H. MAGILL for $1100. This includes two lots, the Doctor receiving the third lot on which his office stands. The Doctor has owned this property more than thirty years, and the house was one among the first built in that part of town. Mr. Magill intends to remove the old house and in its place build a modern cottage. It is an elegant location, for the trees that surround the lot have nearly thirty years of growth, and they alone are worth the money Mr. Magill paid for the lot. The new house will be built as soon as the weather will permit.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

At the sale of real estate to divide up the estate of the late Dr. DAVIS, held in front of the court-house last Saturday, Mr. Charles ZORGER bought the two hundred and twenty acres at $27.25 an acre. Had it not been that one of the eighties is thickly seeded with Canada thistles the land would have brought from $45 to $50 an acre, as the farm is only about four miles from this city. Mr. Zorger got a great bargain, and in the course of two or three years he hopes to have the thistles eradicated, when he will have a valuable farm. The town property, on North Center street, being a two-story frame house and over an acre of ground, sold for the low price of $825 [or $325], Judge INGHAM being the purchaser. The house is of no value, but the lot is one of the best building sites in the city. The sales were made by Master in Chancery MONSON, and are subject to the approval of the circuit court at the March term.

Note: The late Dr. Davis was Hippocrates DAVIS, who died in December 1886. [See obituary].

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

SALE OF REAL ESTATE.

Last week Mr. Lewis FREUDENSTEIN closed a contract with Mrs. Samuel MAGILL for the purchase of her residence, the price being $3750. This trade has been pending for some time, but Mrs. Magill could hardly bring herself to the point to sell the elegant home which she has occupied for so many years. Mr. Freudenstein got a great bargain, as the eligible lots on which the house stands are alone worth $2000 and would readily sell for that sum if there was no house on them and they were subdivided into smaller building lots. The house is one of the best built in Clinton, for Mr. MAGILL spared no expense in making it one of the pleasantest homes in the city. Mr. Magill bought two thirds of the present lot and a two-story frame building which stood on it some time during the war, and paid the late Judge McGRAW $3000 for it. Since then Mr. Magill added the remainder of the lot, which gave him an entire half block. The residence is complete in every respect and the outbuildings are in keeping with the property. Mr. Freudenstein is to be congratulated on his good fortune in getting such a home. Mrs. Magill gives possession on the first of May.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

There was a time when Washington's birthday received appropriate recognition, but nowadays nothing is thought of it. As a mere birthday it should have no special significance, but it would be well not to forget the names and history of the illustrious men who founded the Republic. Before the war, Washington's birthday was celebrated by street parades of local military organizations, appropriate exercises in the public schools, and in the evening by social dances. Business was generally suspended during the day and the people entered into the spirit of the holiday. Now even congress refuses to adjourn on the 22d of February, and the only suspension from labor is in the public departments where the salaries are paid work or play. A social dance is not to be thought of in these days of advanced theological ideas, for the young people who keep step to the music of wicked fiddles and horns are doomed to the broad way that leads to everlasting destruction. But it is considered old fogyish nowadays to enjoy ourselves and make merry on public occasions like Washington's birthday as did the people of half a century ago. The only recognition of the day in Clinton was the raising of THE PUBLIC flag.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

STRICKEN WITH PARALYSIS.

Last evening, for the third time, Mrs. H. STAMATE was stricken with paralysis, and this morning her condition was very dangerous. From the time of the attack Mrs. Stamate has been unconscious. Three years ago she had a light stroke, and then a year later came a heavier one. Mrs. Stamate was sixty years old last Wednesday, and her age may be strongly against her recovery. Her family will have the sympathy of all, for Mrs. Stamate is a kind neighbor and has always promptly given her time in the home of affliction.

[see obituary]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A TALE OF TWO POST-OFFICES.

In Farmer City, on Wednesday, at the residence of the bride's parents, Miss Tot A. McMURRY and Mr. Ed. COLLYER were united in marriage. Only the immediate relatives and a few school friends of the bride were present. Mrs. Collyer, as she is now entitled to be called, is the daughter of Mr. W. C. McMURRY, of Farmer City. She is a young lady of many accomplishments and is a fine musician, being a graduate from the Jacksonville conservatory of music. When her father was postmaster at Farmer City, Miss Tot was his deputy. During the same period, Ed Collyer was deputy in the Clinton post-office. Occasionally there was official correspondence between the offices, and in this way the two deputies became acquainted. From official correspondence grew pleasant personal letters, and when the Farmer City deputy called at the Clinton office one day to pay her respects, of course, to the bald-headed and venerable postmaster, she saw the bright young deputy. It was the old story—love at first sight. When the Rev. Burchard's three R's knocked the daylights out of the Republican party and elected Mr. Cleveland, Ed thought it was a good time to go west and grow up with the country, as the appointment of a Democratic postmaster in Clinton was considered one of the inevitable results. He secured a position as a clerk in the banking-house of Cottingham & Co., in McPherson, Kansas, and remained there till a year ago last September, when he went farther west in that state and located a quarter section of land in new territory. Ed roughed it on the bleak prairies of Kansas till he had secured a half section or more of land and got his title to it, and also secured some valuable town lots in Hugoton. Last fall the county was organized and Ed was elected recorder of deeds, the fees of which office run up into the thousands. He came home at Thanksgiving to see his "best girl," and the proceedings of Wednesday show with what result. Mr. and Mrs. Collyer left Farmer City on Wednesday afternoon for their home in Kansas. THE PUBLIC adds its benediction that happiness and prosperity will be theirs.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Oscar WOODWARD has laid out sixty acres into town lots adjoining Fresno, California, which is called Woodward's addition.


Married, in Clinton, Ill., February 24, 1887, by Rev. P. REYNOLDS, Mr. John Wood EMERICK and Mrs. Matilda HOFFMAN, all of Clinton.


A person receiving a letter from the post office by mistake, or finding one in the street or elsewhere, can under no pretense, designedly break the seal without subjecting himself to a severe penalty; the endorsement "opened by mistake" being "too thin." The penalty varies from a fine not exceeding $500 to imprisonment for ten years.


A new National Bank has been started in Atlanta, in which a number of Waynesville people are stockholders. We find in that list the names of J. P. DUNHAM, W. W. DUNHAM, William GAMBREL, Mrs. E. A. TENNEY, Charles TENNEY, and Dr. S. A. GRAHAM. Mr. Gambrel is one of the directors.


The drivers of the rival hack lines had a free fight at the Central depot last Saturday. The trouble grew out of the positions to which they were assigned at the platform. Eugene LILLARD and Steve HUTCHERSON were cited to appear before Justice McHENRY, and each of the them was fined five dollars and costs.


KELLY Bros. will have a new bread wagon about the middle of this month, when they will be able to supply customers with bread, pies, cakes, etc., every day at their homes. This will be a great convenience to the people. They will also add to their stock a fine line of fancy groceries, for which they will take orders and deliver at the homes of their customers.


Thursday, March 10th, being the fourteenth anniversary of the organization of the Women's Christian Temperance Union in Clinton, there will be a special meeting at the residence of Mrs. E. A. ARGO, to which every one interested in the temperance work is cordially invited. There will be readings, recitations, etc.; also election of officers for the ensuing year.


John H. BERRY and William McDANIELS, the two Ohio tramps who were tried and convicted at the last March term of the circuit court of this county for stealing a railroad ticket from the agent in this city, were discharged from the penitentiary last Saturday, having served nearly one year's imprisonment. They stopped in Clinton on their road home.


For the past two weeks revival services have been held in the Christian Church, conducted by the pastor, Elder HITE. This week he has been assisted by Elder MAVITY, of Maroa. There is considerable interest manifested and large audiences attend the meetings. Elder Hite is an eloquent preacher and he is thoroughly imbued with the doctrines taught by his church. The meetings will continue during next week.


The temperance revival over in Waynesville is having a beneficial influence. There was a time when Waynesville was one of the most moral towns in Central Illinois and gave large Republican majorities, but the saloons came with their demoralizing influences and now they can count upon a Democratic majority of from fifty to seventy-five. This temperance revival may work a political as well as a moral reform.


Dr. TYLER has decided to leave DeWitt and come to Clinton to live. His daughter, Dr. Dora TYLER, will also make her home here, and father and daughter will practice the profession of medicine. The other day the doctor bought the Davis property from Judge INGHAM, and as soon as the title can be perfected in the circuit court he will remodel it for a home. Clinton will be glad to welcome Dr. Tyler and his accomplished family.


Don't be a grumbler. Some people contrive to get hold of the prickly side of everything. To run against all the sharp corners and disagreeable things. Half the strength spent in growling would often set things aright. You may as well make up your mind, to begin with, that no one ever found the world quite as he would like it; but you are to take your part of the trouble and bear it bravely.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Within a few weeks there have been four cases of paralysis in this city. The first was Mr. Sig. FREUDENSTEIN, who has so far improved that he is able to be out. Mr. George CONKLIN was the second victim, and for several weeks he was in a bad condition. Finally he recovered sufficiently to go with his son to Pennsylvania. On Thursday night of last week Mrs. STAMATE had a severe stroke, and she is now in a precarious condition. Mrs. John M. PORTER was stricken last Saturday. Her speech is affected and part of her body is numb with paralysis, but there are strong hopes of her speedy recovery.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IN THE PENITENTIARY.

On the 17th of September, 1886, Watson NEWBERRY and Stephen JOHNSON brutally murdered John Giles ATKINS on a boat lying in the river near Havana. Newberry formerly lived in this county, and went to Havana about three years ago. It seems that all three of the parties were engaged in the fishing business. On that day they had all been drinking heavily, and a row ensued. It was proved on the trial that Atkins was clubbed to death, and that at least two of the fated blows had been struck by Newberry. Messrs. FULLER & MONSON were retained by Newberry's friends to defend him, and the trial was held in Havana on Tuesday of last week. There were no mitigating circumstances connected with the brutal murder, and Newberry's attorneys knew that there was not a ghost of a chance to acquit their client, so they devoted their energies to the saving of his neck from the hangman's noose. Three witnesses from this county were put upon the stand to prove previous good character for Newberry, and then Messrs. Fuller & Monson plead with the jury for the lightest sentence possible under the circumstances. The jury brought in a verdict of guilty against Newberry and Johnson and fixed their sentence at twenty-five years each in the penitentiary. Both Newberry and his attorneys felt relieved when they heard the decision of the jury. If Newberry behaves himself while in prison, he will be liberated in a little over thirteen years. Newberry's mother lives in Creek township, in this county, and is a respectable lady.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Sig. FREUDENSTEIN, on last Wednesday, sold his machine shop to Mr. OAKES, proprietor of the Decatur Novelty Works. Mr. Oakes has not decided what he will do with the plant. His present purpose is to remove it to Decatur, but before doing so he will interview our business men and others as to the prospects of enlarging the plant and continuing the shop in this city. There is no question but that a machine shop, conducted by a practical man, would be a paying investment here. Mr. WALKER made money during the years he operated the agricultural works, for there is a demand for such a shop in every town the size of Clinton. If Mr. Oakes decides upon removing the machinery it will only be a question of time when some man will come in and occupy the field.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Last week we stated that Mr. J. S. WILSON had disposed of his business lot on the square for $3000. It was true then, but later we learned that Mr. Wilson had decided not to close the bargain. He is now figuring on a brick building, and the probabilities are that in a few weeks the old frame will be removed and work begun on the new house. Mr. Wilson has received a liberal offer for it from one of our merchants. It will be a bright day for Clinton when the frames in "chicken row" are all replaced by a fine brick block. It is the most desirable business property in town.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Dick MILLARD stopped in Clinton on his way home from the East to Wellington, Kan. Dick is in the real estate and money loaning business, and while in the East he made arrangements for $500,000 to loan on Kansas farms. In that State the rate of interest is ten percent and a good bonus to the agent. He left Clinton on Monday afternoon, and with him went his great grandfather, Mr. John N. CAMPBELL, and his grandfather, Mr. Phil CLARK. Mr. Campbell will visit among his children, nearly all of whom are in Kansas, and if he likes the country he will probably spend his remaining days out there.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A prominent physician in this county, in conversation with THE PUBLIC reporter the other day, said that for two years, at least, he had made no returns to the county clerk of the births and deaths in his practice. We presume there are others who have also neglected this important duty. The object of the law is to keep a statistical record to be reported to the State Board of Health. Such a record is also valuable in the county, as there are times that the proving a birth or death may be important in contested litigation. It is made the duty of the State's attorney to see that the doctors, and others whose duty it is to make statistical reports, do their duty, and a penalty is attached for a neglect to make such records. We call the attention of the doctors to this fact, as it may save them from paying a fine.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. Lon HOWELL is a Pennsylvanian by birth. Early in the war her youngest brother enlisted in a Pennsylvania cavalry regiment. He was killed in battle on the 6th of July, 1864. When Dr. CALHOUN was elected speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives, THE PUBLIC gave a brief sketch of his life, and among other things stated that the Doctor had been a member of the Twentieth Pennsylvania cavalry. When Mrs. Howell was reading the article she remembered that her brother was a member of the same regiment, and this suggested to her that probably the Doctor might have known him. Mr. Howell met the Doctor not long since and asked him if he knew the young soldier. The Doctor remembered him well, for both belonged to the same company. In the same charge in which the young soldier was killed, the Doctor's horse was shot, and he mounted his dead comrade's horse and appropriated him to his own use.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

At a late meeting of the stockholders of the DeWitt County Agricultural Society it was decided by a large majority to levy an assessment of twenty-five percent on the value of the stock, the money to be spent in remodeling the fair grounds and in the erection of a new amphitheater and other buildings. The society having added ten acres to the fair grounds, for which $2000 has to be paid, intends to fix up so that Clinton can boast of having the best planned grounds in the State. The race track will be one mile in circumference. New stock to the amount of $1300 has been sold, and the directors expect to increase the sales till they reach $2000. The treasurer, Milt. R. COLWELL, is now ready to receive the money on the new stock, as it was payable on the first of March. Extra efforts will be made this year to have the best fair ever held in Central Illinois. The officers and directors are taking hold of the business with an energy that will make success certain.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Miss Alverdia CORDER was completely surprised last Tuesday evening by thirty of her schoolmates, who called to remind her that she had reached the age of seventeen years. The young folks spent a pleasant evening together.


Five young men amused themselves by overturning about one hundred and twenty feet of sidewalk, the other night, in the neighborhood of Mrs. KISER's house. The probabilities are that it will be costly fun for them before another week.


Nearly every small town in Kansas, that does not even number one-half the population of Clinton, is lighted by electricity and has a system of water works. The young towns in the West have more snap and get-up than we have here in Illinois.


George W. CORDER is building a wagon and blacksmith shop on West Main street, three blocks from the public square, and he will be ready for business by the middle of next week. He has engaged competent workmen in both branches.


This morning S. G. CREVISTON, foreman of THE PUBLIC office, closed a contract for the purchase of J. J. RUNBECK's residence, the consideration being $1250. Mr. Runbeck gives possession on the 1st of April. The sale was made through CONKLIN & DAVIDSON's real estate agency.


At the home of Mr. B. BURROUGHS, on Wednesday, his youngest daughter, Miss Cora, was united in marriage to Mr. J. S. DORR, of Rome, New York, by the Rev. W. A. HUNTER. Mr. and Mrs. Dorr left on the night train for their new home in LaSalle, where Mr. Dorr will engage in business.


Charles RICHTER has bought a ranch within four and one-half miles of Fresno, California, for which he paid $16,000. About thirty years ago Mr. Richter was interested in a gold mine in California. Dow SCOTT has bought eighty acres, Pete CONKLIN five hundred and twenty acres, and W. S. FRANCIS one hundred and twenty acres, all in Fresno county.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

"FRAILTY THY NAME IS WOMAN".

Farmer City has been convulsed by the development of a scandal, which brings disgrace and sorrow into more than one home in that town. A young married woman, the daughter of parents of honorable reputation and the wife of a prominent business man, so far forgot the love and affection that surrounded her in her pleasant home as to submit herself to the caresses of a piano and organ peddler, and thus bring shame to her husband and to her parents and kindred. Frank BUCK, the villain in the drama, is a peddler of musical instruments who previous to his going to Farmer City was an agent of Squire FRENCH in this city. Suspicion was strong that during the absence of the lady's husband from home Buck spent the quiet hours of the night in her company. On Wednesday night of last week Miner B. NEAL, the city marshal, and a friend of the family, kept watch on the actions of the lady, and about four o'clock in the morning they saw Buck leaving the house. It is said that the marshal downed Buck with his club, and then that Buck drew his revolver and fired, two of the shots taking effect on the marshal, one of the balls entering his wrist. No arrests were made, as it was thought prudent to keep the matter quiet, nor did the story get out until Friday morning, when the marshal had to submit his wounds to the care of a physician. Buck has left Farmer City. The whole facts in the case have now been made public by some of the parties interested, and the probabilities are that a divorce case will end the first chapter of the scandalous story.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Miss Ada DeCONVILLE, of Bloomington, is the guest of Mrs. R. BUTLER.


Miss FURRY, of Virden, Ill., is in town the guest of her sister-in-law, Mrs. E. E. FURRY.


O. W. BURNS has bought Gus LISENBY's sixty-acre farm in Texas township. Price $3600.


Mr. S. MONLUX and family arrived at home last Monday from their visit to Zanesville, Ohio.


Rhodam THRASHER sold his farm of 105 acres, in Creek township, to C. E. MOODY. Price $4000.


Miss Kathleen HARWOOD, of Bloominton, has been the guest of relatives in this city during the past week.


Mrs. A. L. WARNER's millinery store has been in the hands of the paper hangers and painters this week, and when the work is finished the room will look brighter and pleasanter for the money expended in its decoration.


Some time during last Sunday night a burglar entered the store of KELLY Bros. and carried off a few boxes of cigars and what loose change there was in the drawer. Entrance was effected by the window in the east side of the building.


Charley SLOAT has gone to Wellington, Kansas, to locate. When Dick MILLARD was here a couple of weeks ago he held out such strong inducements to Charley of the great resources of Kansas that he concluded to try it.


Mrs. Henry ZIEGLER was taken to the asylum at Kankakee, last Tuesday, for treatment. Mrs. Ziegler has been an invalid for the past three years, and it was thought that under expert treatment she might recover from her maladies.


Miss May BUCK, of Decatur, formerly of this place, made a visit at home this week, and accompanied by her sister, Miss Carrie, as far as Decatur, started Thursday for Wellington, Kan., where she has accepted a position as book-keeper.


Mr. Henry ZIEGLER, an old resident of this county, left Clinton last Tuesday for Fonda, Iowa, where he owns a large farm. Mr. Ziegler does not expect to return. He leaves a large number of friends who will rejoice to know of his future prosperity.


Since FREUDENSTEIN & Co. have torn down their wooden awning in front of their store the firm can take pride in making a display in their plate-glass windows. They have now a light brass stand in one of the windows on which goods are elegantly displayed.


At the low price which plate glass fronts are now put in, it will not be many months before nearly every store in Clinton will have a new front. This week FOSNAUGH & Co. are taking out their old-fashioned windows, and in a few days a handsome plate-glass front will take their place.


A quarter of a century ago Simeon MORRISON bought one hundred and two acres of land in Salt Creek valley, on the Clinton and Marion road, and on the stream he built a gist and saw mill. This week he sold the property to Rhodam THRASHER for $4080. Mr. Morrison is going to make his home in Clinton.


Mr. W. M. BELL and wife have gone to Medicine Lodge, Kansas, where they expect to make their future home.


Mr. Carl SWIGART desires to express his gratitude to friends and neighbors of DeWitt and vicinity for the respect and kind attentions show his wife during her late illness, and for expressions of sympathy since her death. The memory of these things is the only relief from the darkness of the great affliction.


At a meeting held at the courthouse, on Saturday last, to make arrangements for a Farmers' Institute, to be held in this city under the auspices of the State Board of Agriculture, the time was changed to April 6th and 7th 1887. The following were appointed a committee to make all arrangements for the same: Wm. BISHOP, Wm. FULLER, Jacob ZIEGLER, Z. D. CANTRELL and Arthur MOORE.


Mr. Rob. GALLAHER left for Chicago this week, where he will engage in a general commission and brokerage business on his own account. Rob's business acquaintances in Central Illinois will be of great advantage and at once secure to him a valuable line of customers. He has a large capital to back him, sound business experience, and a social manner that will make him friends. THE PUBLIC wishes him success in his new undertaking.


Mr. William CRAIG, who was a clerk in MYERS' drug store last summer and fall, graduated this week from a St. Louis medical school. The young doctor is now visiting in Clinton but expects to go west to locate.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 11, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE PUBLIC stated a couple of weeks ago that Mr. Lewis FREUDENSTEIN had bought the Mrs. Samuel MAGILL property for a home, but for reasons not necessary to state the sale was not consummated. Mr. Freudenstein was determined, now that he was in the humor, that he would have a home second to none in the city, and last week he bought the John CARROLL property, on North Monroe street, where he will build a modern cottage that will cost about $3000. He paid $1200 for the Carroll property, which is a pretty big price considering that the purchase was made merely to get possession of the lots. There is a good house on the lots which will be moved off to make room for his new dwelling. Mr. Freudenstein has sent to one of the leading architects in Chicago for a design and plans, and as soon as he gets possession of the property, which will be early in April, the work of building will begin at once. This is an encouraging feature of the future of our town when such men as Mr. Freudenstein begin to build homes for their families. He has the money and the taste to make his new home one of the attractions of the north end.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The March Term of the circuit court begins next Monday with the Hon. Lyman LACEY as the presiding judge. The docket is of more than ordinary length, over which the attorneys are happy. There are thirteen cases on the criminal docket. On the old common law docket are seventeen cases, some of which are old enough to be forgotten in the history of DeWitt county litigation. There are thirty-eight new common law cases. On the chancery side are sixty-five cases, thirty-eight of them being continued from last term. Nine new applications are made for divorces, which is an increase in this class of cases. Mrs. Laura V. ANDERSON has determined to rid herself of Charley. She might just as well, for Charley was born under an unlucky star, and the prospects are that he will spend the greater portion of his life in some penitentiary.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Some time during last Monday night a burglar entered Captain MERRIMAN's hotel and visited the captain's room. Not till the morning was it known, but when the captain looked around for his trousers and his vest he found them both missing. There was no money in his pockets, but the captains gold spectacles, his Grand Army badges—which he values more than money—were gone. Capt. Merriman went down to the early morning train in search of his midnight visitor, but saw no one upon whom to fasten suspicion. In returning to his home, he made a circuit through the alley back of his house, and there he found his clothes with everything as he had left them the night before. Tuesday was pay day on the Central, and as the captain has a number of railroad hands boarding with him, the thief evidently expected to make a good haul. Fortunately for the captain he had put his money in a safe place the night before.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WELDON HOME NEWS.

Miss BEYER, who has been visiting her uncle, John BOSSERMAN, returned on Tuesday to her home near Columbus, Ohio.


The people of Hallsville and vicinity are to have the professional services of Dr. E. E. LESCH, who graduated recently at the Keokuk Medical College. Dr. Lesch is one of Weldon's own boys, and we are glad to know that he will locate so near his old home. We bespeak for him the confidence of the good people of that locality.


The new hardware firm starts out with the name of Taylor & Taylor. It is made up of Fred C. TAYLOR, late of Clinton, and Dr. W. H. TAYLOR, of this place. They propose to sell goods at bottom prices, and do all kinds of tin and sheet iron work. J. H. BENNETT, the retiring proprietor, will go west in a short time. Wherever Jim may go, he will be found a good workman and straight business man.


Oscar THAYER has demonstrated the truth of the old adage, "Keep your shop, and your shop will keep you."

One such mechanic is worth more to our town than a regiment off saloon keepers.


Cicero LANE and wife, of Lovington, are visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. ZORGER. He is a brother of the late John T. LANE, the sad victim of hydrophobia, the sale of whose effects took place on Tuesday last.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CLINTON'S NEW POSTMASTER.

The telegraphic dispatches in this morning's papers announce that Richard BUTLER has been removed from the office of postmaster of this city and that Cyrus J. CARLE is to be his successor. For this we were not unprepared, as Captain ROWELL some time ago informed us that in all probability a change would be made soon after the adjournment of congress. We congratulate Mr. Carle on his success, and can only hope for him as pleasant a term as we have enjoyed. Mr. Carle is an old resident of this county, although only a young man. For many years he was successfully engaged in business in the village of Wapella, after which he moved to Bloomington and was engaged as a traveler for a wholesale house. When Mr. HARPSTER became circuit clerk, Mr. Carle was appointed deputy, which position he still holds. In the course of a week or ten days he will probably be ready to assume the duties of postmaster. It will take that much time to have his bond approved and returned from Washington.

On the night of the 19th of July 1879—seven years and eight months ago tomorrow—we took charge of the post-office, superceding Captain PORTER, who was promoted to the post-office inspector's department. We have held the office for a longer term than any postmaster who preceded us. During that time we have handled over $150,000 of post-office funds, and it is a proud satisfaction that every dollar has been accounted for. To the patrons of the office we will leave the question as to how the office has been managed. With but few exceptions everybody has treated us kindly, and it was our endeavor to do the same by the people. To be a postmaster is not all sunshine, but the emoluments were a great help in smoothing the rough edges.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 18, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Mr. and Mrs. C. F. AMSDEN are expected home tomorrow from Hot Springs.


Miss Nellie FURRY, of Virden, Ill., is visiting in Clinton, the guest of her brother.


Mrs. J. C. GALLAHER and her two children have gone to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on a visit.


Messrs. Ed. FURRY and Will McINTOSH spent a couple days in St. Louis this week..


Miss Pet GANDY, who has been spending the past winter in Clinton, returned to her home in Ohio yesterday.


Mr. A. H. MAGILL and his mother went to Hot Springs, Ark., the latter part of last week, where they will probably remain for a month.


Along about the first of May, Mr. BEATTY is going to move his old frame shop off the public square, and on the lot he will build a two-story brick.


Mr. Emil STURM was in Chicago this week, representing Metzger Division in the Brigade meeting of the Uniform Rank, Knights of Pythias.


Mrs. Alex JACKSON left for Indianapolis two weeks ago, and up to this time Mr. JACKSON has not heard from her. He thinks her prolonged absence somewhat strange.


Four handsome wreaths bedecked the coffin of Mrs. Lavina J. NIXON, one of which was from the Chatauqua society of this city, of which the diseased lady was the honored vice-president.


Mr. Charles RICHTER got back from California last Sunday evening. He expects to close up his business in DeWitt during the summer and return to California next fall, to remain permanently.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WHAT AN IRISH LAD HAS ACCOMPLISHED.

While in Chicago last week, the editor of THE PUBLIC renewed the acquaintance of Mr. J. W. REEDY, the president of the J. W. Reedy Elevator Manufacturing company. Twenty-eight years ago when we worked as a compositor in the Cincinnati Enquirer office, Jimmy Reeder was a bright little Irish boy who swept out the office and "held copy" for the proofreader for the munificent sum of two dollars a week. Jimmy worked long hours, from eight or nine in the morning till two or three o'clock the next morning. He was an orphan boy and had no home save such a one as he could get at the small wages he made. Jimmy was full of work and eked out his wages by "distributing cases" for the men employed on the paper. He kept close to his work, and as experience came, so did a trifling increase of salary. In 1868 Jimmy concluded to try Chicago, and to that city he went, poor in pocket but full of energy. He was a genius in the handling of tools and went to Chicago where he leased a small bit of a shop in an obscure alley and began the building of staircases. His shop was his home, for in one corner of the room he had a bed in which he slept when he was too tired to work. His hours of labor were from daylight in the morning till long past midnight, and there in his little shop he was ever planning out some new ideas to help him on the road to fortune. He finally struck upon a new plan for building elevators, and on this he got a patent. As the demand for his elevators increased he enlarged his facilities, till now he has a large four-story brick block, covering about one-half a square in Chicago and employs nearly one hundred and fifty men. In addition to this he also owns a large factory in the city of New York. The little Jimmy of twenty-eight years ago has business property worth nearly $150,000 and besides this he owns an elegant home in the suburbs of Chicago. Two years ago he married a very estimable lady, and now that he has turned forty-two years old, he is in a condition to live in comfort and opulence. The poor little Irish waif of twenty-eight years ago is now one of the solid business men of Chicago. He owes his advancement and prosperity to an industrious life.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 25, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. Franklin VANCE, daughter of Mr. William FULLER, has been dangerously sick the past week with typhoid-pneumonia. The indications yesterday were favorable to her recovery.


Mr. and Mrs. ARMSTRONG desire to express their gratitude to their many friends and neighbors in and around Wapella for the kindness shown them in the sickness and death of their daughter.


Mr. John O. WATTERS is rejoicing over the successful surgical operation lately performed on the neck of his son Frank. Mrs. Watters took the boy to Jacksonville, where the operation was performed.


Perry CROSS is lying at the point of death, his physician having but little hope of his recovery. Perry was attacked with brain fever a week or more ago, and from the first he was deemed to be in a dangerous condition.


Mr. John ONSTOTT, of Springfield, Mo., was in town this week attending to the final settlement of the estate of his uncle, the late A. ONSTOTT, of Waynesville. Mr. Onstott is a prominent member and a high official in the Knights of Pythias.


Peter CASSERLY, a brother of Mrs. C. HILL, of this city, received a severe bullet wound in the hip at the second battle of Chicamauga. All of these years the wound troubled him. The bullet finally worked down to his thigh, and on last Wednesday it was cut out. Mr. Casserly is a printer, and is employed in the Springfield Journal office.


A blaze on the roof of Mrs. STRAIN's house, on North Madison street, last Monday morning, created a stir in that part of the town. The roof caught fire from a defect in the flue, and had it not been discovered before the blaze had made much headway, the building could not have been saved. A few buckets of water and the promptness of the neighbors saved the building.


Mr. Timps. LANE has been dangerously sick for the past five weeks with typhoid fever, and for the greater portion of the time it was feared that recovery was next to impossible. This morning we learn that a change has taken place, and his physician now has hopes of his restoration to health. Mr. Lane's friends all over the county will rejoice with his family over the change for the better.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 1, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

Mr. James LATTIMER's little girl died on Saturday and was buried at Sugar Grove Cemetery Sunday afternoon.


A. D. METZ is building a room on the north end of his store for his undertaker's goods.


Dr. Perry NEWTON has opened an office for the practice of medicine. He has his office in one of W. R.

CARLE's rooms over LATTIMER's store.


E. P. NEWTON & Son returned from Chicago this week.


F. M. WILLIS is improving the looks of his property in the south end, by painting his houses.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 1, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE JUDICIAL MILL.

J. D. BROWN v. John A. PACE. Dismissed


John ERICKSON v. Chas. ANDERSON et al. Judgement for plaintiff.


Benj. L. T. BOURLAND v. George L. GIBSON et al. Verdict for defendant. Plaintiff takes an appeal to appellate court.


Michael J. GOOD v. Washington BAILEY. Dismissed on plaintiff's motion.


City of CLINTON v. Anna WALKER. Verdict of guilty, and Anna Walker sentenced to pay a fine of $5 and costs. Anna takes an appeal to the appellate court.


JOLIET Manuf'g Co. v. Wm. NORTON. Judgement by default.


E. KENT & Co. v. F. M. HUBBELL. Judgement for plaintiff for one cent and costs.


J. H. KNOX use &c. v. J. W. READY. Dismissed by agreement.


D. H. ARBOGAST v. John H. KNOX. Dismissed by agreement.


Mary SHAFER v. Frank BAYLESS. Dismissed for want of prosecution.


Thomas SNELL v. George W. BOTTS. Dismissed by agreement.


F. M. HOWARD et al v. John HILDRETH. Verdict for defendant.


Strong HACKETT Hardware Co. v. R. PUGH & R. BUTTERWORTH. Judgement by default against R. Butterworth.


Strong HACKETT Hardware Co. v. PUGH & BUTTERWORTH. Judgement by default against R. Butterworth.


A. J. BEAVER v. Wm. C. COLLINS. Judgement for defendant, and plaintiff to pay costs.


E. KENT & Co. v. James H. NIXON. Judgement for plaintiff for $1215.99.


Charles ZARTMAN v. Mathew PARKER et al. Dismissed at defendant's cost


Samuel A. GRAHAM v. Aurelius JEFFREY. Dismissed.


Geo. ONSTOTT, Adm'r &c. v. Emma L. WEBSTER. Judgement for plaintiff for $700.


Wm. CAREW v. WM. P. LINDSAY et al. Judgement for plaintiff for $1421.60


The AULTMAN & TAYLOR Co. v. W. D. GADDIS et al. Judgement for plaintiff against W. B. LANE.


John WARNER & Co. v. Drew INMAN et al. Judgement for plaintiff by default.


Green CHANEY Guardian &c. v. James W. HANGER et al. Default as to Hanger. Verdict for defendant, Isaac SHINNEMAN.


W. H. ZORGER v. William GRAHAM. Judgement for plaintiff for $79.05


C. S. & J. C. MEREDITH v. Louis KAISER et al. Dismissed at plaintiffs' cost.


Joseph ALWOOD et al v. S. M. PALMER. Judgement against plaintiff for costs.


DeWITT Co. National Bank v. Moses LAREY et al. Judgement for plaintiff by default.


Clifton H. MOORE et al v. Lewis BATSON. Judgement for plaintiff.


C. S. & J. C. MEREDITH v. Louis KIZER et al. Dismissed at plaintiffs' cost.


Alfred M. SACKETT v. A. A. WEAVER et ux. Judgement for plaintiff for $119.41.


Sadie E. KNOX v. William DAVIS. Judgement for plaintiff.


DeWITT Co. National Bank v. Emma L. MAGILL. Dismissed.


Reuben SACKETT et al v. Wm. M. GRAHAM. Judgement for plaintiff for $48.25.


F. M. PALMER v. Heber MORSE et al. Judgement for plaintiff for costs.


CHANCERY.

Isaac H. STRAIN v. ZORGER & OWENS. Judgement against the estate of Strain for costs.


Isaac H. STRAIN v. Riley V. OWENS. Dismissed.


John H. SMITH v. Louise RICHEY et al. Report of special master approved and ordered that the deed be delivered to purchaser.


Sarah M. PALMER Exur'x &c. v. Thos. JACKSON et al. Decree for $508.12.


Joseph B. CRAWFORD v. Phoebe BEATTY. Stricken from docket.


Nicholas FOLEY et al v. Wm. THORP et al. Decree of partition ordered. Attorney fee, $150.


John G. DAVIS v. Sarah J. SMITH et al. Master's report of sale approved and deed ordered to be delivered.


Dora O. HERRICK v. Emly LAYBOYTEAUX et al. Master's report of sale approved.


Mary REDDICK et al v. Theodore WALLACE et al. Stricken from docket.


Daniel K. PIERSON et al v. Sarah F. KIRBY. Stricken from docket.


Andrew CRAWFORD v. P. A. SMALLWOOD et al. Dismissed.


George W. HERRICK v. John BATSON. Master's report of sale approved.


A. V. LISENBY v. Geo. H. BRITTIN et al. Referred to master.


Julius W. NORTHFORTH v. Lydia NORTHFORTH. Decree of divorce granted.


Nannie DAIGH v. Charles A. DAIGH. Decree of divorce granted.


Parmelia B. HALL v. Emanuel HALL. Decree of divorce granted.


Wm. H. HARP et al. v. Elizabeth HARP. Referred to master.


Chas. M. WRIGHT et al v. Ebert F. WRIGHT et al. Dismissed.


Margaret GOENS v. John H. GOENS. Divorce granted.


Wm. B. LANE v. Alfred JOHNSON et ux. Referred to master.


Laura V. ANDERSON v. Charles B. ANDERSON. Divorce granted.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 1, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The circuit court adjourned last Tuesday that Judge LACEY and the members of the bar might go to Springfield to attend the funeral of Judge Samuel H. TREAT. The Judge died last Sunday.


It was expected that our new postmaster, Mr. J. C. CARLE, would assume the duties of stamp-licker today, but owing to the non-arrival of his commission, Mr. Carle will not be ready for duty till the early part of next week.


Last fall a man in the north end tried to sell his house for $1500 and could not get a purchaser. The other day he was offered that sum in cash and promptly refused. He wants $2000 and is not anxious to sell at that price.


J. E. BRITTIN performed his first marriage ceremony on Tuesday evening, March 22, by uniting the affections and fortunes of James W. MORRISON and Mrs. Mary Jane LEE. The ceremony was performed at the residence of Mr. Frank FISHER.


It seems that Colonel KELLY has been one of the fortunate ones in Lincoln, Neb. A correspondent in one of the daily papers says that the Colonel and his son-in-law, Mr. HOUTZ, have both made large profits on their investments in real estate.


The ladies of the Methodist Church are making arrangements to feed the multitude that will be in Clinton next Wednesday and Thursday, in attendance on the Farmers' Institute. Dinner and supper will be served in the lecture room of the church.


The graduating class in the public schools will number nineteen this year—a larger class than has ever been graduated since the high school was organized. Miss Kate EDMISTON receives the first honor and will be the valedictorian of the class.


On Wednesday, Judge LACEY received a telegram from his home in Havana, announcing the serious illness of one of his children. The court took a recess till next Monday, and the Judge went home that evening.

While the circuit court docket had a larger number of cases than usual, the common law business occupied but one week. The jury was discharged last Friday evening, Judge LACEY will be here next Monday to finish up the chancery docket.


C. C. KELLOGG and a hired man were riding on a load of hay yesterday forenoon, when the horses ran away, overturning the wagon and throwing Mr. Kellog and the man into the ditch by the roadside. The man escaped with slight injuries, but Mr. Kellogg had his right wrist badly fractured, and the chances are that he will be a cripple for a long time. It may be doubtful if he ever fully recovers the use of his wrist and hand.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 1, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

P. M. KEENAN was out near Wapella the other afternoon with a team and wagon from WOLF & DeLAND's livery stable. While Mr. Keenan was in a house trying to sell an organ or piano, the horses broke loose from the hitching post and ran off. When he was ready to start homeward, his horses were missing, and it was then thought that someone had stolen the outfit. The next morning Mr. ROGERS sent his clerk out on a hunt for the team and wagon, and about five miles beyond the place they were hitched he found them in the ditch. Had he been an hour later before finding the horses, one of them would have died from strangulation, as the poor animal was completely exhausted when Walter HARRIS discovered them. The damage to the harness and wagon was not more than six dollars.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Linc. WELDON, of Bloomington, was seized with congestion of the stomach last Monday morning, while riding in the street car from his home to his office. He is subject to such attacks, and his physician ascribes it to a lack of exercise and close confinement to his office.


Isaac MAHON, an old citizen of McLean county, committed suicide last Sunday afternoon, by cutting his throat with a penknife and stabbing himself in the region of the heart. He had insurance on his life amounting to between $12,000 and $15,000.


The new liquor law in Kansas makes it necessary for a man desiring to open a drug store to have twenty-five women sign his petition, and anyone who wants to buy liquor must go before a notary and make affidavit as to what use he would make of it. This law is playing havoc with the wholesale liquor trade in that state.


Mrs. Lizzie HERBERT, wife of a Chicago and Alton switchman who lives in Joliet, has been lying in a trance for three months. She has not spoken a word or opened her eyes but once during that time. Her eyes can not be opened and she can not move. She is kept alive by fluids being forced down her throat. The physicians agree that the woman is afflicted with catalepsy. Mrs. Herbert is thirty-five years old, and is the mother of six children.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Miss Nell CARROLL returned home Tuesday morning from a brief visit in Springfield.


The Rev. O. B. THAYER, who was dismissed from the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church, was reinstated by the Presbytery which was in session in this city this week.


John I. MARVELL and family and Frank E. HARRISON and brother, of DeWitt county, Illinois, old friends of O. J. WOODWARD, arrived in Fresno, Sunday. Mr. Marvell comes to stay, and the Harrison brothers are looking for a location. —Fresno Democrat


The Rev. D. W. BULL, formerly pastor of the Baptist Church, has concluded to retire from the work of saving souls and turn his attention to saving bodies. Mr. Bull has a diploma from an English medical college and will at once begin the practice of medicine in Bloomington.


Sixteen suicides in fourteen years is a large number for one small city, and yet that is the number who have taken their own lives since 1873. All were residents of Clinton except one, and he came here from Bloomington with suicidal intent. Of the number, nine of the suicides were connected with the business interests of Clinton.


Mr. John W. McPHERSON, of Moline, Ill., was in Clinton last Tuesday to meet a sister whom he had not seen for thirty years. The sister married a son of Mr. Thomas ROGERS, and she has been living all these years in Kansas. She is now here visiting her sister, Mrs. Frank M. PHARES. Mr. McPherson was, last week, elected city clerk of Moline, with a salary attachment of $800 a year. He has been acting clerk for the past thirteen months.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FOUR THOUSAND DOLLAR BLAZE
Clinton is Now Ready for Water Works

Clinton has been very fortunate during the past twelve or fifteen years in its escapes from large fires, and this has made the people rather careless and indifferent as to the necessity of providing protection against such emergencies. A dozen years ago a hand fire engine and about three hundred feet of hose were bought, and there has not been a fire in the city since that time that the engine has not paid for itself in saving property.

Yesterday morning, shortly after nine o'clock, a little boy saw smoke issuing from the hay loft of WOLF & DeLAND's livery barn, and he gave the alarm. In an instant almost, a thick volume of flame and smoke burst through the roof, and the men in the barn, with the help of outsiders, had barely time to cut the horses loose from their stalls and run the carriages out into the street before the large barn was a mass of flames. The inflammable material in the barn set fire to John WATTER's house, and the people had barely time to get out the furniture before the building was in flames. On the west side of the barn was a building owned by Mrs. SAVAGE, and occupied by the BAKER family, and this caught fire and was burned. Everything was dry from the long drought, and as all the buildings in the block were of frame and close together, the fire spread with rapidity. William EATHERTON's carpenter shop went next, an a stable owned by Mrs. Savage, and till a few days ago occupied by Jim LISENBY, finished up the block to the alley. Back of Wolf & DeLand's barn, on the alley, was a row of stalls, and here was the tug of war to keep the flames from spreading to Captain MERRIMAN's boarding house. It was here that the engine did good. A steady stream of water was poured on the side of the Merriman house, and Lou HOWELL and a few others were on the roof watching that the shingles did not catch fire. It was a close call, but the house was finally saved and further progress of the fire stayed.

Fortunately there was no wind at the time, and this made successful the efforts to check the spread of the flames. The heat was so intense that the roof and north-east cornice of the MAGILL House began to smoke, and it was only by prompt efforts that it did not catch fire.

John Watter's loss on his building is about $800, on which he had an insurance of $500. On his furniture he had an insurance of $100, which will cover the loss.

The livery barn was the property of Mrs. Mary Magill, which cost $1800 to build. On this there was an insurance of $1200. The policy would have expired at noon yesterday, and while Frank DAVIDSON was making out the papers for a renewal of the policy, the fire broke out. It was a close shave. Never put off renewing fire insurance policies till the last hour.

Wolf & DeLand had an insurance of $1500 on the contents of their barn, but as they saved all their horses and carriages their loss will only be on hay, corn and oats burned. This will not be over $300.

On Mrs. Savage's property, and she owned the house occupied by the Baker family, Eatherton's carpenter shop, and the barn lately occupied by Lisenby, there was no insurance. Her loss will not be over $500, as the buildings were of little value.

W. L. Eatherton lost about $25 worth of lumber and mouldings, and a number of his tools. He had no insurance. Captain Merriman's house was badly scorched on the south side, and a number of the windows were broken. The side door leading into the office was almost burned to a cinder. His loss will be not less than $500, which is covered by insurance. The Captain had his furniture badly damaged in its removal from the house, but on this he had no insurance.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

NOTES.

Mr. W. L. EATHERTON's new carpenter shop is in the rear of Mrs. R. H. PHARES residence.


WOLF & DeLAND's stable for the present is in sheds in the rear of McCLELLAND's carriage shop.


Captain MERRIMAN was so overcome by the heat and hard work that he had to go to bed and have a doctor.


Martin GRIFFIN, the boy who works for Mrs. H. MAGILL, was also overcome by heat and had to be sent home in a carriage.


Miss Grace BISHOP worked heroically at a well, pumping water for the bucket brigade, while a lot of men stood looking at her with their hands in their pockets.


CARD OF THANKS—We can never repay the people for their kindness and help at the fire in saving our home. We shall ever keep in memory this kindness. Yours respectfully, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. MERRIMAN

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Before the last circuit court adjourned last week, Judge LACEY ordered the discharge of John BAILEY from the county jail, because that place was unfit for the confinement of prisoners. Bailey had about three months to serve before his sentence would be completed, but the Judge felt that the risk of keeping him in jail was too great. The new board of supervisors should be called together at once to provide for the sanitary condition of the jail. Some way must be provided for draining the vaults. The health of the sheriff and his family and the prisoners that may be confined in the jail are endangered every hour while the present condition exists.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Andy J. LATTIMER, the popular merchant of Wapella, having sold his business in that town last week, came to Clinton yesterday and bought out COLE's shoe store. THE PUBLIC can congratulate Clinton on the acquisition of as fine a business man as Mr. LATIMER. He is full of energy, a thorough-going businessman, and one who will win customers and make friends in any community. His customers can depend on getting the best class of goods and the worth of their money. There is no doubt but that he will bring a large trade from the neighborhood of Wapella, as Andy is popular with everybody.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

E. W. ROWLAND, who has been occupying Col. SNELL's house for the past few weeks, suddenly announced to his aged wife, last Tuesday morning, that she would never see him again. The old lady was sick at the time. The old man gathered up his wardrobe, took a horse and buggy with him, and vanished out of sight. His poor old wife, who is over seventy years old, is left without a friend or a dollar, and the prospects are that she will end her days in the poor-house.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 15, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ED ADAMS ARRESTED FOR PROVOKING A BREACH OF PEACE.

Yesterday morning while the fire was raging fiercely Gertie TERRY came up town and was standing near the Baptist Church. Her mother saw her and ran toward Gertie and implored her to go home. Ed ADAMS interfered by roughly handling Mrs. TERRY, and for this he was arrested on a charge of provoking a breach of the peace.

Let us begin at the history of this case and give it in brief. About three years ago Ed. H. Adams, who down to that time had made a precarious living by doing little or nothing and watching his wife earn bread and meat for her family over the washtub, suddenly developed into a spiritual medium of remarkable gifts. This opened his path in life, and he has worked the thing for all it is worth. One of the brethren furnished him a house to live in and the others contributed liberally to his support. Ed started a photograph gallery where he furnished to order any number of spiritual photographs of the deceased friends of his patrons. In this business he needed a helper, and he persuaded Gertie Terry, a bright young girl who had successfully graduated from the high school, to go to his home and live. At first Gertie's mother was not opposed to her working for Adams, but when she saw that her daughter was becoming infatuated with the spiritualistic belief and had developed into a healing medium, she tried to persuade her daughter to give up the business and return home. The probabilities are that Gertie would have done so had it not been for the baneful influence of Adams, who seemed to have complete control over her actions. Last fall when Burr ROBBINS' circus was in town, Mrs. Terry went to Adams house to try and persuade her daughter to go home with her, and there was considerable commotion as to the result. Adams put Mrs. Terry out of the house and then armed two men with clubs to prevent her re-entering. A large crowd gathered in front of the house and among them a number of men belonging to the circus. Had it not been for the interference of the marshal, the circus men would have hitched their teams to Adams house and torn it to pieces.

Finally Mrs. Terry got Gertie to consent to go home with her, and then got her a place in Mrs. Mary MAGILL's family. Adams could not afford to lose the services of Gertie, as she was a source of wealth as a pretended healing medium and as one who could bring up the spirits of departed friends, so the same night he went out to Mrs. Magill's residence and persuaded the girl to go back to his house, against the wishes of her mother. At the time of the fire yesterday, Mrs. Terry saw her daughter again and plead with her to give up her delusion and return home, when Adams interfered. The women of Clinton made common cause with the mother, and backed by their encouragement Mrs. Terry had Adams arrested for provoking a breach of the peace. A subscription was raised to hire Judge GRAHAM to assist the city attorney in prosecuting him, and the trial began yesterday afternoon, and continued till this morning. Justice McHENRY presided and the case was tried before a jury of six men. Mr. R. A. LEMON was the attorney for Adams and did all he could for him, but the testimony was strong enough to justify the jury in finding him guilty and sentenced him to pay a fine of $75 and costs. As Adams had no money, he was taken to the city prison, and unless he furnishes the cash or takes an appeal, he will have to work out his fine on the streets.

When Adams came out of the court-house last night he was met at the door by an incensed mob, who pushed and dragged him around till the marshal and sheriff came to his relief and escorted him home. The crowd followed up, and cries of "hang him," "tar and feather him," "run him out of town," etc., were freely uttered. Had it not been for the officers, Adams would have been dragged from his home, and it is hard to tell what would have happened. To save himself he accepted the hospitality of the sheriff and spent the night in jail in the same corridor into which Patsy DEVINE took his fatal leap some years ago.

Adams publishes a spiritual paper and succeeded in getting the members of the society to pay for the plant. A few weeks ago one of the brethren expended $350 for the printing material owned by S. A. EDWARDS. He has successfully humbugged those who befriended him. The people of Clinton are determined to get rid of him or else have him give up his fraudulent practices.

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April 22, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A DEPARTED SPIRITUALIST.

In last week's PUBLIC we told of the trials and tribulations of Ed ADAMS. We gave the result of his trial and also told of his incarceration in the city prison in default of the payment of a $75 fine and costs assessed against him. None of Adam's friends came to his relief; they had already been bled profusely. Adams did not like the idea of doing hard work on the streets in lieu of the cash, and when it was suggested to him that the fine would be remitted if he would leave town, he gladly accepted the offer. When the council met last Monday night, the fine was suspended and Ed was released, and on Tuesday morning he took the first train for the west and by this time he is safely in Hannibal, Mo. His family is still in Clinton, and will remain here till such time as Ed can raise the money to send for them. His wife and children are to be pitied. Mrs. ADAMS has had a hard time of it, for till Ed went into the spiritualistic business, home supplies were scarce. Ed never took to work kindly.

The people of Clinton were not incensed against Ed on account of his belief in spiritualism; to that no one objected. We have a number of good men and women who are spiritualists. But what Clinton did object to was the fraud he was perpetuating on unsuspecting people. He made a few believe that he was a spiritualistic power, and they had to pay dearly for their confidence in him. The relations of these people were incensed at the manner in which Ed was robbing them. Now that he is gone it is not likely that anyone else will play the fraud so openly.

(more)

April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Ed. H. ADAMS has written back to Clinton announcing that he has located in Hannibal, Mo., and that he had fair prospects of getting into business. Ed intends to open a printing office, and he will probably continue the publication of Echoes from Sunny Land. If he can only find a few admirers in Hannibal like those he had in this city there will be no doubt of his success in getting a good living. His wife and family went to him last Friday, and on Monday morning Gertie TERRY mysteriously disappeared from her mother's home, and the probabilities are that she has gone to join Adams. Gertie is evidently a believer in spiritualism beyond redemption, and it is useless for her friends to try and turn her thoughts in any other direction.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 22, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Frank CRUM, who was married last week to Mr. W. D. STOREY's daughter, came to town yesterday to buy furniture for his new home. He drove up in front of MEREDITH's store, where he wanted to order groceries, and before he had time to hitch his team, the horses broke and ran off. After the horses started, Frank followed them and climbed into the wagon, but before he could get hold of the lines, the horses were wildly racing across the square. He finally got hold of the lines and would have succeeded in checking them had not the traces given away, which released them from the wagon. Frank held on to the lines and was dragged out of the wagon, but finding that he could not stop the horses, he released his grip on the lines. The horses ran across the square and over into the burnt district, where they were caught. There was no damage to horses or wagon, and Frank was not much injured by his sudden exit over the front of the wagon.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 22, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Peggy BARTON is a holy terror in the neighborhood in which she lives, and she has made life so unpleasant for the Wapellicans that there would be a day of general thanksgiving if she would transfer herself and her earthly possessions to some remote locality. Peggy has a neighbor who is very nervous, and it is Peggy's delight to quietly surround the house and fire a volley of brickbats at it. On Wednesday she armed herself with a club almost as big as a fence rail and made a raid on Mr. WILSON. The nuisance became unbearable, and yesterday morning Sheriff HENSON went out, armed with a warrant, and brought Peggy to town. As her trial will not be till tomorrow, Peggy was confined in jail. The old woman did not like the quarters in the lower part of the building, as it would require copious showers of otter of roses to perfume the atmosphere, so the sheriff gave her quarters in the upper chamber.

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April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

During the Mrs. BARTON trial last Saturday, a laughable scene occurred. An Irish gentleman who was on the witness stand was badgered somewhat by the attorney for the defense, which he meekly stood for a while, but when the prosecuting attorney called Pat's attention to a remark made by the defendant's lawyer, up jumped Pat from his chair and jerking off his coat, ready for hostilities, dared the attorney to repeat what he had said. The attorney explained to the satisfaction of Pat that nothing wrong was intended by his mild insinuations, and bloody war was averted.

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April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. Peggy BARTON, who was arrested last week for making life miserable for her Wapella neighbors, had her trial last Saturday and was fined $50 and costs. As the money was not forthcoming, she was sent to board with Sheriff HENSON. Mrs. Barton's family does not approve of the notice given the old lady in last week's PUBLIC. According to their story, which is too vigorous for publication, the whole population of Wapella, and her neighbors in particular, have conspired to drive the last of the Barton family into exile from the home of their youth. One of Peggy's neighbors, the story goes on to tell, wants her property, but is not willing to pay for it. They offered to sell it to him, but she says he wants to drive her away and take possession of it. The Barton geese and the Barton cows are waylaid and assaulted by the wicked neighbors, and poor Peggy's life is made miserable. She says she came to Wapella when there was but two houses in the town, and those who do not like her can pack up and leave; she is going to stay right there.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

For some weeks past it has been very evident to the immediate friends of Mr. C. F. AMSDEN that something was wrong with his mental faculties. About a year ago Mr. Amsden had a slight paralytic stroke, which at the time was attributed to his excessive use of cigars, he being an inveterate smoker. On the advice of his physician Mr. Amsden gave up the use of cigars, but his nervous system never recovered from the shock. During the winter he consulted a celebrated physician in Chicago, who advised him to give up business cares for a time and spend a few weeks at Hot Springs and take a course of baths. This Mr. Amsden did, but it would seem that the baths were not beneficial to him, for when he returned home he was more nervous than ever; and those who were intimate with him could see that his mental powers were failing. The sad death of Alfred H. MAGILL, who was Mr. Amsden's partner in the dry goods business seemed to unsettle Mr. Amsden's mind completely, and a close watch was kept on his actions. His relatives saw there was necessity for prompt action, and on Monday morning they took him before the county judge and a jury and had him adjudged insane, and the same morning he was sent to Jacksonville, accompanied by Dr. WILCOX, who was his physician. Mr. Amsden was thoroughly conscious of what was being done, and he willingly consented to be taken to the hospital for treatment. It was a wise precaution on the part of his friends to act promptly in the matter. A few weeks of treatment in a hospital where mental diseases are made a specialty may result in his complete restoration.

Note: C. F. Amsden died Dec. 21, 1888 [see obituary]. He never recovered his mental faculties.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Cornelius GRIFFITH, of Wyoming Territory, was, on Wednesday morning, adjudged insane by a jury in this city, and was ordered to be sent to the private asylum at Jacksonville. Cornelius is a son of Mr. Byard GRIFFITH, a wealthy farmer in Harp township. He was born in this county thirty-six years ago. About eleven years ago he went out to Wyoming Territory, where he followed the trade of a mason and secured considerable property. Some time last fall he began to exhibit signs of mental aberration, his hobby being that he was continuously pursued by cowboys who threatened his life. After his mind became affected some sharpers succeeded in swindling him out of his property. His wife finally persuaded him to come back to his father's home, where he arrived on the 4th of March. Since his arrival in this county he has gradually grown worse, till now he is completely off. He has a wife and four children. Mrs. Griffith is a native of this county also. She was the daughter of Alexander D. HART, who formerly lived in the neighborhood of Niptight. Ike GRIFFITH, another son of Mr. Byard Griffith, was sent to the Jacksonville asylum about twelve years ago. After being confined for a time he succeeded in making his escape, when he wandered off to South America, where he died.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. William GREER, formerly of Oxford, Ohio, has been in the city this week as special agent for the Masonic life insurance association of Princeton, in this State. It was a pleasure for THE PUBLIC to greet one from old Oxford. We knew his father a quarter of a century ago when Will was but a lad. He has appointed Mr. W. M. GRIER as an agent for the company in this county.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Yesterday evening Frank PALMER was trying to ride a young horse without saddle or bridle. The horse made a sudden lurch and threw Frank on a barbed fence. The barbs tore the muscles of Frank's right leg into the bone so badly that the doctor had to put in about a dozen stitches to close up the wound. The prospects are that Frank will be confined to his bed for a couple of weeks.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

J. M. RANDOLPH, formerly supervisor of Tunbridge township, moved over into Logan county about a year ago. Last Friday night his barn was burned and with it three horses and a mule. There was in the barn, when the fire broke out, twenty horses and a number of cattle, and while trying to get the stock out, Mr. Randolph was kicked into a burning building by a mule and was badly burned. A large quantity of hay, grain and farm machinery was destroyed. The barn cost $2000 and was insured for $1200. There was some insurance on the stock and contents of the barn, but not nearly enough to cover the loss.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

John DAY, Jr., a son of Mr. John W. DAY, had a serious attack in his father's drug store last Saturday morning, from which he has been confined to his home since that time. During the fire two weeks ago, young John worked very hard, became over-heated, and then cooled off suddenly. The result was congestion of the stomach, for which he took some simple remedies. On Saturday morning he came down to the store when he should have remained at home, and in a little while he was seized with a fainting fit and for some time he was unconscious. He felt the faintness coming on and had barely time to call his brother before he fell over. For an hour or more the case looked serious, but he rallied and was then taken home, where he has remained since.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mayor-Elect HARRIS and the members of the city council held a caucus last night for the purpose of deciding upon the men to fill the appointed offices. There was a diversity of opinion on the different offices with the exception of candidates for superintendent of the cemetery and the lamplighter. It was substantially settled that Platt HILDRETH and Henry WILLIAMS would be re-appointed. For marshal, Fred HANGER and Ed MOFFETT have their supporters; for street commissioner, Tom SMITH, George MOORE, W. D. STOREY, and J. H. SPARKS are candidates; and for night watch the contest is between Jake CREE and Joe BOTKIN. There is no telling who will be the lucky men for the different offices, as the board is divided on all of them, and none of the candidates seem to have a positive majority. Another caucus will be held before Monday night, and the appointments will all be determined upon before the new council meets.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The old Clintonians will remember John B. CAREY who kept a saloon in this city before the war, in a frame building that stood on the corner lot where FREUDENSTEIN & Co.'s clothing store now is. Carey's saloon was the resort of the old time Clintonians and he did a thriving trade. Finally he became disgusted with the saloon business and sold out, and from here he went to Maroa, where he engaged in the grain and lumber trade and made money. A few years ago he moved to Wichita, Kansas, where he has lately built a palace hotel which cost him $75,000. His enterprise was so well appreciated by the citizens of Wichita that they presented him with a handsome gold watch studded with diamonds.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 29, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Last Sunday evening Jimmy MARTIN came riding on horseback into town from Hugh MAGILL's farm. The horse took a notion to run off with Jimmy and he did it. Jimmy seemed to have lost his wits, for instead of trying to check the speed of the horse he held the lines loosely in his hands and came up the street shouting like a Comanche Indian. The horse made a sudden turn into WHEELER's livery barn, and Jimmy, thinking he had ridden about far enough, rolled off the horse and fell with a heavy thud on the sidewalk. When picked up and carried into the office, it was thought that Jimmy's horseback riding days were over. A doctor was hastily summoned, but by the time he reached the stable, Jimmy had recovered consciousness. He felt a little sore in body from his fall, but was not seriously injured.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 6, 1887 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DIVIDING THE ESTATE.

When Mrs. L. J. NIXON died, the dower interest she held in the estate of her deceased husband, George NIXON, reverted back to the direct heirs of Mr. Nixon. There was the homestead, which was one of the finest farm residences in the county, 200 acres of prairie land, 160 acres of timber pasture, and the house in Clinton that was occupied by Mrs. Nixon. The widow's real estate was valued at $16,200, and this the six heirs divided equally and amicably. The children had confidence in each other's integrity, so they agreed among themselves as to the value of each tract of land and divided the whole as fairly as it could be done. Dwight L. NIXON took the homestead and forty acres adjoining. As this amounted to more than his pro rata share he paid the difference in money. Mrs. Ben CAIN got the forty acres east of the homestead, and Mrs. ANTISDEL the forty acres on the west. Elmer got forty acres west of Mrs. Antisdel's; Ira the forty east of the homestead; and Walter the 160 acres of pasture and timber. Mrs. Antisdel also gets the house in town, she paying the difference in the value as between the others. She also traded her forty to Dwight for a forty on the opposite side of the road, which squares out her farm and gives her 140 acres all in one body. How much better to agree among themselves in the division of the estate than to take the matter into the courts and spend a large portion of the property in litigation, besides the heart-burnings litigation brings.

[see obituary]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 6, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

The assessors are now making their annual rounds, and poverty is everywhere prevalent.


Messrs. C. A. HOLT, Wm. BOOTH and J. D. ROGERS went up to Dixon one day this week to catch fish.


Mrs. E. J. SPINK was called the other day to Kansas by a telegram announcing the serious illness of her mother.


F. M. CISCO, of Wapella township, has received notice that his pension claim has been allowed. Steve CARTER was the agent in getting the claim through.


During the hail storm last Sunday, drivers of horses had quite a time in keeping their teams from running away. The hail peppered the horses and scared them.


Ex-Marshal HANGER has been appointed night watch in the Central freight yards, at a salary of $45 a month. The Central company has secured a faithful officer.


Bill STOREY has gone back to his trade as a carpenter, and the day after he handed over his star to his successor he was at work shingling WOLF & DeLAND's new barn.


Mr. Harry MAGILL went to Jacksonville this week to visit his brother-in-law, Mr. C. F. AMSDEN. He reports that there is no immediate prospect for Mr. Amsden's recovery.


Mr. E. KENT has bought the old Joel WILSON building, now owned by KELLY Bros., on the public square, and will have it moved down to his lumber yard and have it fitted up for warehouses.


Mrs. O. E. NEWMAN has a large quantity of silk worm eggs to give to those wishing to try silk culture. They are of the large white and yellow varieties, furnished by the Department of Agriculture.


Ed. FREEMAN, of Weldon, was released less than two weeks ago from the insane hospital at Jacksonville. The first part of this week he was off his base again, and it became necessary to send him back to the hospital.


Mrs. J. C. GALLAHER and her children have been visiting relatives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They got back home Saturday evening. Mrs. Gallaher was sick when she left home, but returns very much improved in health.


Mr. WILKINSON, superintendent of the Springfield division, was in town this morning arranging for the building of the double track from the junction of the Havana and Springfield divisions, west of town, up to the Central depot.


KELLY Bros. having sold the old building off the lot on the public square which they bought from J. S. WILSON, will begin as soon as possible the erection of a brick building. There is some talk of making it three stories, and fitting up the upper story for a lodge room.


Frank BURROUGHS, who has been in Indiana for the last three months on business for the Phoenix Fire Insurance Company of Brooklyn, N. Y., of which company he has general charge of the collection department, is at home this week taking a vacation.


KELLY Bros. have a handsome bread wagon and they now deliver bread, cakes, etc., to customers in any part of the city. The wagon makes its daily round. This will be a great convenience as it will save the trouble of people sending down town to buy bread.


This has been a moving week. Mr. GRIFFIN, master mechanic at the Central shops, moved into his own house, the one he bought from Mr. VOGEL. Mr. R. A. LEMON bought the FORD house, lately occupied by Mr. GRIFFIN, and he took possession this week. Andy LATIMER moved his family from Wapella and is occupying Mr. LEMON's house.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 6, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Walter McGRAW & Co. will open a new bakery and confectionery in this city tomorrow. The firm comes from Mt. Pulaski, where they have heretofore been in business. They will do a general bakery and confectionery business and have a pleasant room for ice cream parties. THE PUBLIC, on behalf of our citizens, gives the new firm a cordial greeting, and hopes for their success.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 6, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

When Ed. MOFFETT was with his regiment at Kenesaw Mountains in Tennessee during the war he picked up a piece of laurel root and brought it home with him, and kept it as a relic of war days. Mr. McINTOSH, the other day, got the piece of wood and made it into a square block and gave it a high polish. On this he placed a silver plate on which he engraved "Ed. Moffett, Kenesaw Mountain, 1864," and presented it to the new marshal. Ed now wears it as a watch charm, and he is very proud of it.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 6, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

William and Ed. BOSSERMAN came home to visit their father, Mr. Samuel BOSSERMAN, who is now living in Holder, McLean county. Both of the young men, we believe, are natives of this county. They were in Clinton this week visiting their brother Joe. William served three years in the 107th Illinois Infantry, and sixteen years ago he left his home in DeWitt and went out to Grafton, Neb., where he has been successfully engaged in the grain business. His wife is a daughter of Mr. John MARSH, formerly of DeWitt. Ed left here four years ago and is now a traveling salesman for a wholesale hat and fur store at Council Bluffs, Iowa. William met a number of his old comrades of the 107th and this made his brief stay more enjoyable.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 6, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE OLD AND THE NEW.

The old city council met last Saturday night and wound up the business of the year, and then turned over to their successors the management of public affairs. During the past four years more permanent and substantial improvements have been made in the city than has ever before been accomplished by preceding councils. A large amount has been expended in tile draining, which has been beneficial in making better roads. A few years ago, some of the streets were impassable at certain seasons of the year on account of the mud. Now the same streets are solid and substantial. Tile draining has worked wonders. The taxes have been expended judiciously and economically, and no part of the city has been neglected. Very few small cities in Illinois have better sidewalks or better streets. It has been the aim of our city governments for the past fifteen years to keep out of debt. As a consequence city orders have always been at par and every man who worked for the city or furnished material received his money promptly. The old board can retire with the consciousness that they have been faithful to the interests of their constituents and they turn over the affairs of the city to their successors in better shape than they found them.

On Saturday night the new council, with Mayor HARRIS at the head of affairs, held a short session for the purpose of transacting some important business that could not lay over till the regular meeting on Monday night. There was considerable speculation as to who would be the lucky men for the appointed offices. A caucus had been held on Thursday night of last week, but no definite understanding could be arrived at. As was stated in last week's PUBLIC the mayor and the members of the council could not harmonize in the selection of candidates, and thus the matter was left till the regular meeting on Monday night. A large crowd was attracted to the council chamber, as every candidate had friends who were interested in his success. The mayor, under the law, has the advantage of the council. No man can be nominated for an appointive office unless by the mayor; and if the council were to unite on any one candidate he has not the ghost of a chance unless the mayor nominates him. Mayor Harris's choice for the office of city marshal was Ed. MOFFETT, and he was confirmed by a vote of four for to two against. Ed. Moffet has before filled the offices of marshal and street commissioner, and in both places he made a good officer. For night police Joe BOTKIN was elected. His duty will be to patrol the city instead of confining his duties to the public square. He will receive a salary of $50 a month. If the merchants want a special policeman they will have to hire one. Heretofore the city paid $20 toward the salary and the merchants paid the remainder. Platt. HILDRETH was re-appointed superintendent of the cemetery, and Henry A. WILLIAMS lamplighter, and both will receive the same salaries paid last year. There was a deadlock on the mayor's appointee for the office of street commissioner. Mayor Harris nominated George MOORE. The council rejected him by a vote of five to one. It is very evident that Tom SMITH will have to go, but who his successor will be is not known at present.

Now let the new council get down to work. The mayor and the members of the board are in perfect harmony on one point, and that is that there must be an advance along the line of improvements. With a little promptness on the part of the board, we might appropriately celebrate the Fourth of July, by lighting up the city by electricity. And then in due time we can get ready for a grand jubilee when the water works are completed. Great things are expected this year.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 13, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS

Andy LATIMER was in Chicago this week and brought home another cobbler to work in his shop. The old fellow has his bench in the plate-glass front and keeps sewing away from early morn till dewy eve.


Walter McGRAW & Co., the proprietors of the West Side Bakery and Confectionery, opened up last Saturday and have been doing a splendid business. They have made arrangements with A. M. SACKETT & Son to sell and deliver their bread to any part of the city. Ice cream every day.


The Farmer City Republican says: Mr. William RUNDLE, of Clinton, is a fine Sunday school worker. His twenty minutes talk to the Sunday school convention on Sunday forenoon was directly to the purpose, and abounded with zealous fervor in the cause of Sunday school work.


We learn from a Maroa paper that Mr. George W. FREY, landlord of the MAGILL House in this city, has resumed the charge of Central House in Maroa. He was the proprietor of the Central before he came to Clinton. He is a first-rate landlord and has the executive ability to manage both hotels.


While Mr. Sam PEDDICORD was at work yesterday, building an addition to Mr. P. SLOAT's house, the scaffold on which he was standing gave way, and Mr. Peddicord was precipitated head foremost into a pile of scantling. He was badly injured on the face and head, but fortunately escaped any broken limbs.


G. W. NIXON & Co. have bought Charles RICHTER's tile yard in DeWitt, and will give their personal attention to the business. Mr. Richter has made considerable money out of his tile yard, but as he is getting his affairs into shape so that he can move to California next fall, he sold the yard at a less price than the machinery cost.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 13, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Jeff TUTTLE, formerly of Clinton, has been cooking in Lincoln's saloon, in Farmer City, for some time. Last Saturday night a Bloomingtonian named James ROBINSON went into the saloon and pawned his coat for a dollar's worth of "budge," and the coat was given over to Jeff to be held till the money was paid. Robinson got hold of the coat and walked off with it, and Jeff followed him, whereupon there was a fight. Jeff had a scale weight in his hand with which he struck Robinson on the head and then when Robinson fell down from the blow, Jeff jumped on him and injured him seriously. Jeff came to Clinton Monday where he was arrested by the Farmer City marshal.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 13, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

In no building in Clinton has the expenditure of a few hundred dollars made a greater improvement than in the refitting of the old post-office. The building belongs to Mrs. Arthur MOORE, and with a woman's pride in having her property look well she had a handsome plate-glass front put in and the interior thoroughly overhauled. It is now one of the neatest store rooms on the public square. Mrs. McFAIL has leased it for a millinery store and her goods now show to much better advantage than they did in the old room, and everything looks fresh and bright. Mrs. McFail will be glad to have her lady friends call on her in her new home.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 13, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The board of education of this city held a meeting last Saturday night for the election of teachers for the next school year. As two of the old teachers have consented to become blushing brides at an early day, they were not applicants. The following teachers were re-elected: Prof. J. W. COULTAS, superintendent; Miss Minnie BISHOP, principal of high school; Ella McHENRY, Ella BARBER, Ada HUNTER, Minnie HUTCHIN, Hattie PORTER, Grace CARTER, Mrs. L. K. ROSE, and Mrs. DICKEY. Mabel HUNT and Ida McHENRY were the new teachers elected to fill the vacancies. The case of one of the old teachers was held over till next Saturday evening. The departments have not yet been assigned for the teachers. Sam HENSON was re-elected janitor.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 13, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Farmer City Republican is horrified at the idea of a mother of that town going to the creek with her family of boys to fish on Sunday, and asks: "Are we living in the Christian town of Farmer City, on the banks of Salt Creek, or on the banks of the Ganges in India?" Will some of the school children of Farmer City set Bro. EWING's mind at rest as to the exact locality of that town. If the boys were determined to fish on Sunday, was it not a good idea for the mother to go with them to keep them out of mischief?

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 20, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Note: This is an article about the high school graduation in 1887. I was copying the page for an obituary and didn't see this until later. I'm sorry I didn't get the beginning of it, but I thought it was worth typing anyway. It begins in the mid-sentence, listing the speeches that the students gave.

...Anna B. MARTIN, "Boasting"; Edward B. MITCHELL, "Graduation and Coronation"; Amy L. PHARES, "Faith and Success"; Frederick V. MacARTHUR, "Crimes and Penalties"; Elfa M. HUTCHIN, "Play the Sweet Keys, Would'st Thou Keep Them in Tune"; James H. BLOYE, "Are All Men Equal"; Anna JOHNSON, "Woman a Factor in Civilization"; Harry C. CLINE, "The Puritans Unworthy of Praise"; Ella VAUGHN, "Images of Truth." Kate M. EDMISTON was the valedictorian of the class. To particularize would be to do an injustice, as the orations and essays, each and all, contained much of originality in thought and expression. Many of the topics were novel, and the manner of handling new and bright.

The expression seemed to be general that the exercises surpassed those of any former years. The floral offerings were a noticeable feature, their beauty and abundance proving the popularity of each member of the class.

Prof. COULTAS addressed the class in a few words of encouragement and advice, using the words of Paul to the Romans: Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate; be not wise in your own conceit; recompense no man evil for evil; provide things honest in the sight of all men; be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good. The diplomas were presented by Prof. Coultas, and the audience dispersed amid the pleasant strains of the Clinton cornet band.

NOTES.

Miss BISHOP, the popular principal of the high school, was the recipient of a fit of quaint design from the boys of the class of '87. It consists of a silver bar pin with silver coin, bearing her monogram in gold, as pendant.


Mame M. SACKETT received a handsome gold watch from her father.


Milton FREUDENSTEIN entertained his classmates at his home on Tuesday evening.


Miss Kate WALTON's vocal solo deserves mention. Her selection was good, and her voice clear and pure as usual.


Miss BISHOP took advantage of the occasion to surprise the graduates, and gave to each a dainty painted souvenir.


Prof. MUELLER received a hearty encore after playing "Home Sweet Home."


The usual reception will be held this evening, in the school building. The refreshments are in charge of the ladies of the Christian Church.


Mr. Al. HAYNIE, of Clinton, Mo., was present to witness the graduation of his niece as valedictorian of the class.


The art souvenirs presented by Miss BISHOP to the literature class are the work of Miss Ada DeCONVILLE, of Bloomington, who has made an enviable reputation by her delicate water color sketches.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 20, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Last Sunday evening there was a large audience in the Presbyterian Church to hear Dr. CALHOUN's address to the graduating class of the high school. The address was brief, but full of good suggestions and thought. He set forth the great and special duties devolving upon citizens of a free government, and forcibly demonstrated that liberty does not mean license. Sound and practical advice was given to the young people, and a strict adherence to the counsel given will contribute not a little to the success of those for whom it was intended. The importance of activity, patience, truthfulness, and honesty was dwelt upon, and the Doctor may be assured that his address did a positive good.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 20, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

This morning Mr. D. C. JONES was taken before Judge INGHAM and a jury, and an inquest held on the condition of his mind. The case was so plain that the verdict was unanimous in favor of sending him to the insane hospital at Jacksonville for treatment. Mr. Jones realized his mental condition and was perfectly willing to go. Twenty years ago Mr. Jones began using morphine as a medicine. The habit grew upon him so that it became a necessity. He dreaded its influence, but when he attempted to stop using it his physical sufferings demanded a return to his daily supply. Last January morphine became repulsive to him and he could not use it anymore, and from that time his health began to fail, and day by day both mind and body lost their vigor. It may be that the course of treatment in the hospital will restore his bodily vigor, which may have a beneficial effect on his mental condition. Mr. Jones is the oldest business man in Clinton.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 20, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Remus DAVIS, of Barnett township, is the first veteran in this county who served in the Mexican War to receive a pension under the new law, which went into effect last January. Mr. Davis has been allowed a pension of $8 a month. There are some twelve or fifteen survivors of the Mexican War in this county, all of whom have made applications for pensions. Remus Davis enlisted in this city in the company organized by Captain Daniel NEWCOMBE, who at that time was circuit clerk of this county. The company was assigned to Col. E. D. BAKER's regiment, and was mustered into service on the 18th of July, 1846. The regiment participated in all the principle battles of the war, and in June, 1847, was discharged from the service.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 20, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Rev. A. T. ORR has been circulating a subscription newspaper for the purpose of raising money to improve the interior of the M. E. Church, which is badly needed. It is intended to put in a board ceiling and ornament the sides, between the window spaces, with brackets; have the walls newly calcimined or papered, and the pews and woodwork brightened up in color. It will take about $1500 to pay the bill. Mr. Orr has had reasonably fair success in obtaining subscriptions.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 20, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A large number of the property holders in this city have, at considerable expense and labor, beautified the streets in front of their residences by the making of terraces, and keeping the grass neatly trimmed. There is another class who take particular pleasure in driving their stock and horses and wagons over these terraces. They have no taste for the beautiful and like to show their contempt for anything aesthetic. The city council has ordered its attorney to prepare an ordinance, making it a finable offense for anyone to ride or drive over the terraces or who may do anything to injure or destroy them.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 20, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Albert HIATT, who lives in Farmer City and is a section hand on the I. B. & W. road, had one of his legs badly crushed last Monday night. Two crews of men were returning home on separate hand cars, and Hiatt was sitting on the one in advance, on the rear end, with one leg hanging down. In some way the cars came together, catching the exposed limb, and crushing it fearfully. He was taken home, but it was several hours before the physicians could reduce the fracture, as the bone was broken in a number of places, and the flesh badly contused.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Thirty years ago this summer, Mr. GARY owned two lots on the north side of the square on which he erected a number of one-story frame buildings for store rooms. The lots in those days were not of much value, and did not cost him more than $400 each, if they did that amount. The buildings were merely shells, and if they cost $500 each it was an enormous sum. One of the rooms is now occupied as a billiard hall, and belongs to a grand-daughter of Mr. Gary. The other was occupied when first built by Phil WOLF's father and Mrs. T. N. BYERLY's father, who were in partnership in the grocery business. Some ten years later Mr. Joel S. WILSON bought this building, for which he did not pay over $1000. In those days real estate on the public square was not considered to be of any great value, and indeed a lot in a almost any other part of the town would readily sell for as much money. In this building Mr. Wilson made sufficient money to support himself and wife now that the years are beginning to tell on them, and a few weeks ago he sold it to KELLY Bros. for $3000 in cash, or three times the amount he originally paid for it. As the Kellys intend to erect a building on the lot they sold the old frame to Mr. Emmett KENT, and he is now having it moved down to his lumber yard, where it will be converted into a warehouse. One by one the buildings on "chicken row" are being moved out at a slow rate. In time we hope to see the whole block cleaned out of frame buildings and in their place a row of brick business houses. It is the most eligible business property in the city.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Dr. J. C. MYERS was in Chicago this week on business.


J. R. ROBERTS, of Farmer City, has had his heart gladdened by an increase in his pension.


Dr. W. F. CALHOUN goes to Belvidere on Memorial Day to deliver the oration, and Prof. COULTAS will go to Cerro Gordo.


Rev. GILLMORE, of Farmer City, will deliver the memorial address at Rucker Chapel, Sunday, June 29th, at two o'clock P.M.


Mr. & Mrs. G. B. GRAHAM and their son John were in Chicago this week for the purpose of consulting an oculist about John's eyesight.


Sigismund FREUDENSTEIN is probably dying. His physician and his relatives have but little hopes that he can rally from his last paralytic attack. [see obituary]


On next Wednesday Senator John SHERMAN, of Ohio, will deliver a political address at Springfield. It will repay every Republican in the State to hear him.


SPINK & SYLVESTER are putting in a full roller process, and will not receive any grain until further notice. Farmers having flour in the mill can get it at any time.


Dr. WARNER expects to start for California next Tuesday, and on Thursday Mr. Jake VOGEL and family and Mr. Gus LISENBY will also leave Clinton for the same State.


Miss WOODS, one of the teachers in the Farmer City public schools, was united in marriage last week to Dr. HATFIELD of that town. Two of our Clinton teachers are preparing to follow suit.


During the storm last Sunday night Mr. HOWER, who lives north-east of Farmer City, had two horses killed by lightning, and Mr. HILER, near Weedman, had a cow and colt killed by the same destructive element.


Burglars seem to have a mania for making midnight visits to Mr. BISHOP's residence. Last Saturday night his house was entered and a small amount in cash was extracted from the pockets of his trowsers [sic].


The grocery houses of this city now close at half-past eight o'clock in the evening. This is a good thing for proprietors and clerks, as it gives them an hour or so before bedtime to get acquainted with their families.


Two weeks from next Monday Treasurer FULLER will begin the sale of lands for delinquent taxes. He thinks by that time that less than $1000 will be due on the delinquent list. There is yet time to save costs by paying up.

There is no cloud without a silver lining. Dr. J. C. MYERS received a letter the other day bringing to him the sad intelligence that his aunt Molly had departed this life. In her will she remembered the Doctor, leaving him $4000.


Mr. Harry MAGILL intends to put a plate-glass front in his store room, lately occupied by AMSDEN & Co., and thoroughly renovate the interior, so that it may be a desirable building for whoever may buy the stock of goods and reopen the store.


Dr. Lew HUNTER has had charge of Drs. CALHOUN & SAWHILL's dental office the past week during the absence of both members of the firm. Lew is quite an expert in dentistry, and those who have required his services during the week are well pleased with his skill.


When Drs. MYERS and SAWHILL were in Chicago the first of this week they bought two lots in a new sub-division, five miles from the court-house, for which they paid $825 each. This morning they received a telegram from Chicago, offering them $1200 each for the lots, which they accepted. They made $750 in less than four days.


Pass by Fred CRANG & Co.'s dry goods store at almost any hour in the day and you will always be sure to find a number of customers at his counters. Fred is a pleasant young man to do business with, and his assistants in the store are prompt and attentive in attending to the wants of customers. And then he keeps as fine a stock of dry goods as can be found in any house in town.


While Ald. A. D. McHENRY was in Taylorville last Tuesday he met a number of his old comrades of the Forty-first Illinois, and together they had a good time talking over the days of 1861-65. Three companies of the forty-first were raised in Christian county, which has always been a Democratic stronghold, and it is the boast of the members that not one of them in that county votes the Democratic ticket.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Clifton WARNER, second son of Major WARNER, was badly injured last Tuesday. Clifton was standing on the porch at home with a loaded shotgun. His mother warned him that he had better remove the cap from the nipple of the gun in case of accident. Clifton drew the gun toward him to obey the injunciton of his mother, and in doing so the hammer caught on the edge of the porch and discharged the gun, the whole load of shot tearing away the muscles of his right arm. It was a bad wound and will lay him up for some time.

(more)

May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

While Dr. GOODBRAKE was dressing Clifton WARNER's wounded arm last Tuesday, and when the boy was suffering intense pain, he looked up at the doctor and said: "This puts an end to me milking the cow now, doesn't it Doctor?" Clifton has no love for the dairy maid business, and the prospect of turning over the milking to his brother John was a ray of sunshine even in the gloom of suffering

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Uncle Billy DILLAVOU, who enlisted in the 107th Illinois Infantry long after he had passed the age when he was liable to military duty, has lately been granted a pension dating from June 30, 1865. From that date till 1884 he was allowed four dollars a month, and from 1884 it was increased to eight dollars a month. The old man will get nearly $1200 back pension and eight dollars a month during the remaining days of his life. Uncle Billy has deposited the money in one of our city banks, and will use it sparingly to provide him the comforts of life. The old man and his boys were all in the army and made excellent soldiers.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE RUBBER GUN HAS MADE ITS MARK.

Grant ABBOTT, who lives on his mother's farm six miles north-east of this city, came in to DAVIDSON's tile yard last Wednesday morning for a load of tile. When he was driving homeward, and in front of McABOY's green-house, he was struck in the right eye by a pebble shot from a rubber gun, and the sight from that eye is gone forever. Dr. WRIGHT says he has no hopes of saving the eye. The boys who fired the pebble say that they were shooting at birds and had no intention of hitting young Abbott. That may be true, still it does not help the matter any. The rubber gun is a perpetual nuisance. Go where you will and you will find boys shooting with them at something; and it makes but little difference to them what damage they do. Window panes are broken, and people walking along the street are liable to be hit. Several efforts have been made by the officers to stop this rubber gun business without effect. The injury of young Abbott will bring the matter forcibly to the attention of the city council and an ordinance may be passed that will put a stop to this nuisance.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Harry MAGILL, conservator of Charles F. AMSDEN, has completed an inventory of the stock of the dry goods firm of C. F. Amsden & Co., and made his report to the county court yesterday. The stock of goods invoices between $5000 and $6000. Mr. Magill has had several offers from parties wishing to buy the stock, and the probabilities are that within a few days some disposition will be made of it. Mr. B. G. HENION, of Bloomington, was looking over it last Monday and was very favorably impressed with the advantages of Clinton as an opening for business.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Rev. J. W. LAPHAM, who a few years ago was pastor of the M. E. Church at DeWitt, and from there went to the Weldon and DeLand circuit, is hopelessly insane and confined in an asylum in California. During the year he was at Weldon his intellect was evidently impaired, judging from some of his actions. He left the pulpit and devoted himself to the practice of medicine, which profession he studied before he entered the army. While living in this county, Mr. Lapham was compelled to confine his son Alonzo in an insane asylum, where he yet remains. Insanity seems to be hereditary in the family.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 27, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Dr. DOWNEY performed an operation on Willie DURKEE yesterday afternoon by tapping him and drawing off three and one-half gallons of water that weighed thirty-seven pounds. The little sufferer, who has been sick for two years, is doing as well as could be expected. This is the second time he has been tapped, the first time being last July, when sixteen pounds was taken from him. He stood the operation very bravely and without any trouble, sitting quietly in a chair during the trying ordeal, which occupied about an hour. His disease is dropsy of the heart.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


  December 9, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

KILLED IN NEW MEXICO.

The editor of THE PUBLIC received a dispatch yesterday morning from Chas. J. DAVENPORT, dated Carlisle, New Mexico, December 8, announcing that William H. FITZGERALD had been killed the night before. The dispatch also stated that particulars would be sent by mail. Through the kindness of Sheriff HENSON a messenger was at once dispatched to Barnett township to carry the sad news to Mr. James Fitzgerald, the father of the young man. Mr. Fitzgerald came to town and telegraphed to Mr. Davenport to have the body sent by express to Clinton, but up to a late hour this afternoon no answer had been received. William H. Fitzgerald was thirty years old. He left his father's home seven years ago and went to New Mexico to seek his fortune. That he was reasonably successful his friends have every reason to believe.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


December 16, 1887

WM. H. FITZGERALD WAS MURDERED.

In last week's PUBLIC we gave the substance of a telegram announcing the death of William H. FITZGERALD. The following letter explains the particulars. His father sent a telegram to have his son's body sent here, but from some cause, no answer was returned.

Carlisle, New Mexico, Dec. 7.

James FITZGERALD,—Yesterday I telegraphed you the sad intelligence that your son, Wm. H. Fitzgerald, was killed. He met his death by a cowardly shot, fired by an old enemy. From the evidence given at the inquest we conclude that it was cold-blooded murder, and if the murderer is apprehended he will speedily meet his just reward at the hands of Judge Lynch. Your son was in the employ of our mining company, and was highly respected by all who knew him, and, I am glad to say, deserved their respect. We had him as decently buried as was possible for this wild country, and his many friends will always remember him as a jovial companion, and always liberal to those in need of his charitable hand and open purse.

He is owner (together with his partner, Mr. W. DEBOS) of four good horses and a wagon, also a good mining property, one that will be worth looking after. He also had a suit against a mining company of this place for $800, which will probably be tried this term of the court. This matter deserves your immediate attention, and he is sure to get judgment and can recover the amount. The attorneys who have charge of the case can tell you more of the matter.

What ready money and movable property he had is in the hands of his partner, Mr. Debos, who bears the reputation of being an honest man, and will I am quite sure look after your son's interests, as he was devotedly attached to him. If I can serve you in any way, my dear sir, I beg that you command me.

With deep sympathy, I am very truly yours, Chas. J. DAVENPORT.

(see obituary)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


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