NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS - 1885

January 9, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Wilson S. MASON, who went from his home near this city a year or more ago to engage in business in Rockville, Mo., is back here on a visit to his father and mother. Mr. Mason was married on New Year's day at Newcastle, Penn., to Miss Ida May PORTER, of that city. He and his bride will remain here a couple of weeks, when they will go to their home in Rockville. Mr. Mason is the owner of an extensive hardware and lumber business, and till the time of the election was making money. Since then business has been very dull. The Democrats in Missouri are not well pleased with the political change which they helped bring about, and now wish that Blaine had been successful.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 16, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The MASON family has been passing through the deep waters of affliction. Robert and Wilson came from Missouri to spend the holidays with their father and mother, each bringing his family with him. Last week Robert Mason's boy died of diphtheria, and since then Robert and Mrs. Wilson Mason have both been afflicted with the same disease. For a day or two it seemed as if Mrs. Wilson Mason could not recover. Yesterday afternoon Dr. WRIGHT, the attending physician, reported that both of his patients were in a fair way to recover.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 16, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The dwelling-house on the Anderson BOWLE's farm, in Barnett township, was burned down on Wednesday evening. The fire must have caught from a defect in the chimney as the flames were first seen breaking through the roof of the house. Nearly all the furniture was destroyed, as the flames made rapid work. Old Mr. Bowles was sick in bed at the time, and while trying to get him out of the house to a safe place of refuge, the family gave no attention to the saving of the furniture. The property belongs to Mr. R. B. BOWLE's, and the house was worth not less than one thousand dollars. There was no insurance, so the loss is total. This is unfortunate for Mr. Bowles.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 30, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A BAD ACCIDENT.

Rufus WILSON is a farmer living in Wilson township, near John ROLOFSON's farm. Mr. Wilson was at work last Tuesday running a steam corn-sheller. The day was very cold and the driving band slipped on the wheel. To remedy this, Mr. Wilson reached across the sheller to put resin on the leather band, when the sleeve of his coat caught in the cog-wheels and drew his right arm in between the revolving cogs. The flesh was torn from his arm between the elbow and the hand and the bones were badly broken, and had it not been for the breaking of the bevel wheel of the machine, Mr. Wilson would have been drawn in and crushed to pieces. The probabilities are that his arm will have to be amputated. It is an unfortunate accident for him as he has a wife and six children depending upon him for support.

[must have looked worse than it was…]

February 6, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. W. WILSON, who got hurt last week with the corn sheller, is getting along fine and will be out again soon.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 30, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A large number of the residents of Niptight were in Justice McHENRY's court last Monday, either as witnesses or spectators. The day was stormy and country life was dull, so the boys thought they would come to town for a little recreation. Peter COLLINS, Jr., and Walter MATTHEWS were the central figures in the case. On the 11th of January, Collins and Matthews, with a lot of neighboring boys, had gathered in the Niptight blacksmith shop. Matthews was swinging on a chain and bumped against Collins. This made Collins hot in the collar, and the result was a scuffle. Collins plunged a knife through the fleshy part of Matthews arm, making an ugly gash. For this he was arrested and arraigned before Justice McHenry. Collins had to pay $25 for fine and costs.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 30, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On Wednesday morning, at seven o'clock, the thermometer registered 22 below zero in this city, and out in the country, south of town, it marked 30. All through the day it was intensely cold, but toward evening the weather moderated considerably. Yesterday the sun shone out bright and warm, and at noon the thermometer stood at 20 above zero.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 6, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FROM MONTANA.

Editor Public.—The letter received by W. H. GAULT from Mr. Stanton DANISON, formerly of DeWitt county, but now of Custer county, Montana, will be read with interest by his many friends, who will be glad to hear what he is doing and where he is. Please give it a place in the columns of THE PUBLIC. 

J. W. SWISHER.

Rosebud, Custer Co., Montana

Friend Will—I take my pen in hand to write you and let you know how I am and where I am. I suppose you all thought that I was dead or had been gobbled up by the Indians, but such is not the case. I left DeWitt county in the spring of '83, but have not been able to do anything until this summer. Since then my health has been very good. I left Deer Lodge, Montana, the 20th of last June for this county. I came here with horses and cattle. We had 180 horses and 1010 head of cattle. We are about 500 miles from where we started. We arrived here the 20th of September, our route being along the Yellowstone for about 300 miles. It would take me a week to tell you all about the trip and the beautiful scenery of the now famous Yellowstone country.

We have had the finest weather here I ever saw; we have no snow. Stock is looking fine, and we have now about 10,000 head on the range. I think it will be eaten out soon. Water for stock is very scarce on the range. The country here is very thinly settled. I am on the night herd and get $60 per month. I have two saddle horses for my use. Horse thieves were very troublesome here last summer and I had to look sharp when herding. There were seventy of the thieves, but the citizens and cowboys killed thirty-nine of them; I suppose you have read of it in the papers. We are afraid they will break out again in the spring. The cattle and horses that we are herding belong to a Mr. QUINLIN, of Galena, Illinois. I think I will get me a ranch somewhere in this country. I would like for you to come out and look at the country some time. We are only ten miles from the Crow reservation and about fifty from Custer's battleground. We don't hardly know when Sunday comes, and Christmas is almost unknown out here.

As I have written enough this time, I will close.   

Stanton DANISON

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 6, 1885 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

SOME REMINISCENCES OF DE WITT COUNTY.

The first criminal case tried in DeWitt county was at the May term of the circuit court in the year 1840. At the October term preceding, George CLIFTON had been indicted by the grand jury for cutting the hoof-strings of a pig of the value of five dollars, the property of B. LOWRY. At the May term Clifton was put upon trial, and the jury after wrestling with the case for a time finally rendered a verdict of "not guilty."

The first murder trial was in September 1840, Judge TREAT presiding in the circuit court. The grand jury in their presentment of the case set forth "that Spencer TURNER, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil," did strike Matthew K. MARTIN on the side of the head with a certain wooden stick, of the value of ten cents. It matters not how much the stick was worth for it filled its mission successfully, and poor Martin died three days afterward, on the 18th day of April, 1840. Judging from the history of the case, Martin was of the bibulous kind, and the probabilities are that he helped bring on the difficulty which resulted in his death. Turner was wise in the selection of his counsel, for he chose Abraham LINCOLN and Stephen A. DOUGLAS to defend him. In those days the lawyers traveled over the circuit with the judge of the circuit court, and Lincoln and Douglas were in DeWitt county at almost every term. A year after the indictment by this grand jury, Turner was put upon his trial and was acquitted. Turner had no money to pay his attorneys, so Douglas and Lincoln each took a promissory note for $200. Douglas was sharp enough to get good security on his note, but the easy-going Lincoln was satisfied with Turner's note, with William Turner as endorser. The money was not forthcoming at the maturity of the note, so Mr. Lincoln began suit for its collection at the October term, in 1841. A judgment was rendered in favor of Mr. Lincoln, but he never got a dollar for his services. Spencer Turner finally gave Mr. Lincoln a horse in payment of the judgment, and soon after the horse went blind and was perfectly worthless.

The old pioneers of DeWitt county were not extravagant in their management of public affairs. The cost of the county government for the first seven months of the year 1839 was only $562.96. Of this amount the county officers received as compensation $220; and for the entire year of 1840 the total expenses of the county was only $983.33. The first treasurer of the county, J. C. McPHERSON, had never more than $25 in his hands at any one time, and it is no wonder that he resigned his office in disgust before the first year of his term had expired. The county had five treasurers within the first three years after it was organized, every one of whom resigned. DeWitt county now pays the courthouse janitor more salary than was paid all the county officers combined for the year 1839.

In 1842 the total loss to the county by the failure to collect the taxes was $6.03, and there were only nine delinquents. Of these, two died before the tax became due, and the other seven had removed from the county.

When the first assessment of taxable property had been made in this county, there was about thirty-five thousand acres of land owned by one hundred and sixty residents and fifty non-residents. The lands were valued at over $150,000. At that time there were over five hundred voters in the county, so it will be seen that even in those days of cheap land, when any man could have secured a quarter section for little or nothing, the majority were content to plod along without a home of their own. It is only a few years ago that one of the old settlers left this county to go west, where land was cheaper, who told the editor of THE PUBLIC that he had lived as a renter on one farm in Wapella township for more than a quarter of a century, and that he had many a year paid more for the rent of the land than he could have bought it for when he first moved on to the place.

These reminiscences of old days are interesting, and one might follow up the historical research with much pleasure.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 13, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The wanderers from Clinton who went west to grow up with the country are returning to visit the "old folks at home." Mr. James CLAGG, of Webster City, Iowa, is here visiting his father and mother for a few days, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert MILLARD, of Wellington, Kans., arrived here yesterday. Mr. Millard is going to Pennsylvania on a visit, but Mrs. Millard will stay here for a few weeks with her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Phil CLARK.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 13, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Ed COLLYER, who for the past two years has been assistant postmaster in this city, leaves this afternoon for McPherson, Kansas, where he has accepted a position in the banking house of WILLIAMS & COTTINGHAM. Ed has been a faithful clerk in the post-office, attending promptly to duty. He is a young man of fine business capacity and is well adapted for the new position which he is to fill in McPherson. We regret his departure, for in our official capacity as postmaster we depended much upon him. Messrs. Williams & Cottingham, who are old citizens of this county, will find him a faithful clerk. Ed and Charley CONVERSE will be in the same bank.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 13, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A DOCTOR IN A NEW ROLE.

One of the saddest duties that falls to the lot of the faithful physician, who has used every remedy that his skill may suggest to the cure of his patient, is when he must tell the family that nothing more can be done and that the end is fast approaching. A young doctor in this county not long since had this experience. He did all in his power for his patient, but reluctantly he came to the conclusion that there was no "balm in Gilead" that would give a renewal of life and vigor. He told the family in a few hours more the end would come, and that the loving husband and father would join the silent majority. The shock was a terrible one when they came to face as a reality what they had for some time been dreading and which would be the end of the loved one's sickness. The patient himself did not dream of dying, buy hopefully looked forward to the coming of the life-giving spring weather when he could once more superintend the working of his farm. This presented a dilemma to the family. The patient had made no preparations for his death, and his family was anxious that he should know his fate so that he could make some arrangements about his business matters. But who should break the terrible news to him? None of the family could do it, and it was finally agreed that the young doctor must tell the story. The doctor went into the sick man's room and found him propped up in an armchair as calm and hopeful looking as though he had many years of life before him. As the doctor looked upon the sick man his heart failed at the task that was before him, but he knew it would not do to delay as the hour of dissolution was fast approaching. He led up to the subject as gently as possible, and finally the story was told. "Surely you must be mistaken," said the patient, "for I feel ever so much better." However, the patient became convinced, and then requested that his family be called in. "I want some of you to pray for me," said the sick man. None of the grief-stricken family felt equal to the task. Then he turned to the doctor and said, "Do you every pray?" "Yes," said the doctor, "but I have never prayed in public." "You must pray for me then," said the dying man. Here was a dilemma for the young doctor, but he could not resist the earnest appeal. Down on his knees he dropped, and for ten minutes he poured forth his soul in prayer. The doctor is a church member, but one of the easy-going sort who rarely attend prayer-meetings or take a prominent part in religious work. Within twenty-four hours the sick man was a corpse.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 20, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CAUGHT AT LAST.
Arrest of W. B. Fuller in Rochester, New York.

A few years ago there came to this city a young man of fair appearance, named W. B. FULLER, who opened a billiard hall in the room over N. J. RUNBECK's tailoring establishment. Fuller was a professional masher, and a number of the foolish young girls in this city fell dead in love with him. One young girl fell a victim to his wiles, and when the question of marriage was suggested to him he quietly skipped out. Fuller did not get far enough away from Clinton to escape the officers of the law, and he was shortly afterward brought back and lodged in jail. As he had no money and no friends the prospect was opened before him of either marrying the girl or remaining a prisoner for an indefinite length of time. Fuller chose the orange blossoms in preference to the cold comforts of a prison house, and he was released and the marriage ceremony performed. He went to work for a book agent in Bloomington and got away with a lot of books, but as the Bloomington man shortly afterward fell under a cloud he had to skip out and there was no one to prosecute Fuller. Then he went into the insurance business as a sub-agent for Mr. J. H. CONKLIN, and worked in the southern part of this State for the farmers' department of the Phenix of Brooklyn, N. Y. Fuller was quite successful as an agent and made some money, but the fellow was a dead-beat and had no idea of earning an honest living. Not satisfied with his legitimate profits as an agent, he forged between $400 and $500 of insurance paper, which the company had to honor, as he was a regularly recognized agent. Then Fuller left for parts unknown, and since that time the company has been "laying" for him.

Fuller's parents lived in a town in the state of New York, but he was sharp enough to keep away from home. He kept up an occasional correspondence with his wife, but as he was suspicious that he might possibly be detected through the postmark on his letters, he sent this letters to his wife under cover to another party. Marshal MOFFETT has been working up the case for more than a year past, and the other day he managed to get a clue that led to the locating of Fuller in Rochester, New York. He was living there under the assumed name of William FOSTER. Last Saturday a letter came from him to his wife, and by some means the marshal got wind of it. He traced up the matter and in this way got a positive knowledge that Fuller was in Rochester. He telegraphed the chief of police, and this morning an answer was received that Fuller was in custody. Today State's Attorney BOOTH is preparing the papers for his arrest, and will send to Springfield to Governor OGLESBY for a requisition on the authorities in Rochester for the return of Fuller to Clinton. The marshal will probably start for Rochester tomorrow, and by the middle of next week Fuller will be back in his old lodging house in Clinton where he made choice of orange blossoms instead of imprisonment. Fuller has a sure thing on a term in Joliet.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 6, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

SCIENCE HILL SCHOOL.

Where persons are united by the bonds of genuine friendship, there is nothing, perhaps more conducive to felicity. There is true enjoyment in that friendship which has its source from the innocent heart. Such pleasures do greatly sweeten life, easing it from many a bitter burden. There are times when a teacher's heart is too full for utterance; words are inadequate to express the feelings of the teacher of District No. 1. Friday Feb. 27, being the last day of the winter term, teacher and scholars participated in a few exercises, consisting of declarations, select readings and dialogues. After the valedictory address, when I was about to say adieu to my scholars, Miss May HARTSOCK stepped out in front of the school, and addressed the teacher, making a very appropriate speech, concluding with, "Please accept from your scholars, as a token of their love, friendship and gratitude, which we feel for you, and as a remembrance of your kindness to us." You will see on the first page of this book our sentiments:

To our teacher kind and true,
This keepsake I present to you.
And when you tread life's rugged path,
Think of us by this, our autograph.

Report of Science Hill School

Bell COLWELL, 99; May HARTSOCK, 99; Earnest MITCHELL, 85; Robt. STRINE, 86; Lola COLWELL, 92; George STRINE, 96; Freddie ZIEGLER, 97; Ralph HARTSOCK, 96; Johnny WILLIS, 98; Artie ZIEGLER, 69.

Hannah DANIELS, Teacher.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 6, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Frank LEMON, oldest son of Mr. R. A. LEMON, was bit the other day by a vicious dog. The boy was walking along the street when the dog jumped up at him and fastened on his face, biting him through the upper lip and the nose. The dog's teeth sunk deep into the flesh, and the wound is liable to leave a bad scar on the boy's nose and lip. Little Frank's face has been swelled up for some days.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 13, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES.

The county clerk has just completed a condensed report of the births, marriages and deaths in DeWitt county for the past three years. As these statistics are interesting in that they show the natural growth and decrease in population of the county, we will give the substance of the tables:

In 1882 there were 233 births, which were divided as to sex, 125 males and 107 females. [That only adds up to 232.] One child was born of colored parents. Three of the mothers of this brood of native Americans brought eleven and more children into the world. Three of the fathers were under 20 years of age and two were over 55 years. The men who were between 31 and 35 years old were the fathers of the largest number of children. In nationality: 214 of the fathers were Americans, six were Irish, and four were Germans. The mothers of the largest number of the children were between the ages of 21 and 25 years. Two children were born of mothers over 45 years old. Six of the mothers were Germans and 218 Americans. No twins were born in this county during the year 1882—at least the report does not show any such efforts at increasing the population.

In 1883 the number of births fell off to 208, but one of the mothers had twins. This year the sexes were divided as follows: 113 males and 95 females. Two of the children were colored. The father of one of the children was over 55 years, while the mothers were all under 45 years. Only one child had an Irish father, while two of the mothers were natives of the Green Isle. Eight of the fathers were Germans and nine of the mothers. There were 189 American fathers and the same number of American mothers.

In 1884 the number of births shows a still greater falling off. There is a difference of 50 between the number of 1882 and 1884. This was progressing backwards in the effort to increase our county with a population to the manor born. Ninety-three of the children were boys and 80 girls, and not one from the colored race. Only one of the number was the tenth child of the mother. Three of the fathers were under 20 years old, and 27 of the mothers were under that age. One of the mothers was less than fifteen years of age. Three of the fathers were between the ages of 51 and 55 years, and seven of the mothers were between 41 and 45. In nationality, 151 of the fathers were Americans, 7 Germans, 7 English, and 5 Irish, and 162 of the mothers were native Americans.

The death roll of the county is not as complete as it ought to be, owing to the neglect of parties whose duty it is to make report to the county clerk. For the year 1882 there were 61 deaths reported, of which 36 were males and 25 females. One death was caused by Bright's disease and one by sunstroke. Twenty-seven of the deaths occurred during the first three months of the year, being exactly nine each month, and in May and June eight died each month. One of the persons who died was between 85 and 90 years old. Between 20 and 30 years of age there were nine deaths, and between 30 and 40 years there were eight.

In the year 1883 there were only 37 deaths, showing a large decrease in the number from 1882. Of this number 18 were males and 19 were females. Seventeen were single and nineteen married. The widowers seem to be tough old chaps for not one of them gave up his hold on this life and but one widow died.

In 1884 there were ten more deaths than in 1883, the total number being 47. Nearly half the number died during the first three months of the year. Twenty-four were single, seventeen married, one a widower, and five widows. One died who had passed the eightieth milestone on the road to eternity.

During the three years there were 502 marriages, of which 177 were in 1882, 167 in 1883, and 158 in 1884. The number of divorces are not reported.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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April 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

AND GREAT WAS THE FALL THEREOF.
Great Destruction of Property.

Two Brick Buildings Demolished.
The Total Lost About $10,000.

Clinton had its horror this week. On last Monday morning, about 2 o'clock, those who sleep in the vicinity of the public square were awakened by a loud crashing noise, which sounded to the suddenly aroused sleepers as though an earthquake had overthrown the brick buildings around the square. The center wall which divided KILLOUGH's hardware store and METZGER's harness store had given away at the foundation, and the whole wall, from cellar to roof, fell down, the floors in the two rooms falling to the center in the shape of a letter V. Both floors in Killough's store were packed full of heavy goods, and on the side of the room next to the center wall was long row of cooking and heating stoves, from the front to the rear of the building. In the condition in which the foundation wall was, this weight was more than it could bear. For more than a year past, Mr. Killough had felt uneasiness about the safety of the foundation of this wall, and it was only in the latter part of last week that it was decided by the joint owners of the buildings to have it rebuilt. Last Saturday James KIRK was at work in the cellar, trying to temporarily repair some of the most dangerous places in the wall, and during the time he was at work he felt uneasy lest some part of it would fall down. It was intended that he should begin on Monday and rebuild the whole foundation, as the bricks that were in it were crumbling away, and there was but little mortar in the wall to hold them together. Then the foundation was not more than two or three bricks below the surface of the cellar, and the dampness caused the soft bricks to scale and crumble. It is the opinion of those who examined the wall that if it had been properly built at first this catastrophe would not have happened.

On both the ground floor and the second story of Killough's hardware store there was a large stock of heavy goods, and when the center wall gave way, stoves, tinware, implements, shelf goods, etc., tumbled to the center. On the other side was Metzger's stock of leather and heavy harness on the first floor, and in the second story was the Register printing office, with its heavy power press on that side of the room. On the east side of the room in the Register office was the heavy marble imposing stones, and all of the type and material used in the paper. This mass of stoves, etc., in the hardware store, and the leather, harness and printing material in Metzger's building, was all tumbled together into the cellar, and mixed with bricks, mortar and broken timbers. To add to the destruction, part of the roof also fell in. It was a sorry sight when daylight appeared, as before that time no one dared to brave the danger and enter either of the buildings. Here were four active business men, who were interested in the two buildings, who had the earnings of years swept away in a few minutes, and because of the character of the destruction, not a dollar of indemnity to help them out of their misfortune. Fortunately there was no fire in the building at the time, and thus the destruction of the whole block was prevented.

Mr. Killough carried a large stock of goods and was doing a prosperous business. In a few minutes, more than two thousand dollars were swept away. Not a stove, or any of the goods on the east side of the room, escaped damage, and the shelf goods on the west side were thrown together in such confusion that but little was saved that was not more or less damaged. The same is true of the goods that were piled up in the second story.

In Metzger's store, the loss was proportionately great, for what was not totally ruined was so badly damaged that the sets of harness will not bring half their original cost. Mr. Metzger's work shop, in the rear of his store, escaped much injury from the falling wall, so that he was successful in saving nearly all his tools.

An accident of this character in a printing office almost insures total destruction, and Mr. WAGGONER lost all of his news and display type used in the publication of the Register. The new cylinder press, which he bought not over a year ago, went down with the floor and only stopped when it reached the cellar, but fortunately this was taken out of the ruins so little damaged that $50 will make all of the necessary repairs. Mr. Waggoner's loss amounts to between $700 and $800, but as will be seen by an article in another column of the PUBLIC, the people promptly came to his assistance and gave him timely aid. The Register job material and Liberty press was in the south end of the room over Metzger's work shop, and, as the floor did not give way nor that part of the partition fall, all of this material was saved.

Mr. Metzger owned the building which he occupied, in the second story of which was the Register office. His loss on stock in not less than $3,000, as it will have to be entirely rebuilt. The front and back walls and the wall on the east end were left standing but they were so badly jarred that it is probable all will have to be torn down and rebuilt.

The building occupied by Mr. Killough was owned in partnership by him and Mr. William CLAGG. It will cost not less than $3,000 to replace it. The store was the first brick building put up on the north side of the square and was built about twenty years ago by Mr. Wm. Clagg when he was in the hardware business. He afterwards sold a one-third interest in the property to Colonel KELLY, who sold it to Mr. Killough a couple of years ago. Mr. Clagg's loss on the building is about $2,000, and Mr. Killough's $1,000. Add Mr. Killough's share in the building and his loss in stock, the misfortune struck him for fully $3,000. This means the savings from years of hard work, but Mr. Killough has energy and pluck, and opened a new store in Union Block, under the PUBLIC office as soon as he could gather the remnants of his stock out of the ruins. Mr. Clagg's loss is the greatest of all, for on the income of this building he mainly depended for the support of himself and his invalid wife. At one time Mr. Clagg was one of the most prosperous men in Clinton, but reverses came upon him in his old days, in the shape of security debts which he had to pay for others, and gradually his property has slipped away till now his last and only resource went down with the crash of last Monday morning.

The Register has moved to the room over RUNBECK's tailor shop, and in the course of a week or so will be on deck again. Let the PUBLIC say a word for its unfortunate neighbor and suggest that now would be a good time for all who are in arrears for the Register to pay up. Bro. Waggoner needs every dollar that is due him.

Mr. Metzger is temporarily occupying the frame building on the west side of the square, where he will be glad to see his old friends and customers.

Mr. Killough is located in the room under the PUBLIC office. While his stock was badly deranged the other morning, he is now getting things into shape to accommodate his customers. His stock of agricultural implements was all saved, therefore he can supply the wants of farmers. Now is the time to help a man in distress, and our citizens can give Mr. Killough a great deal of encouragement by patronizing him. And everybody who owes him a dollar should promptly call and pay him. With over $3,000 of his capital wiped out at one dash, he needs now the help of his friends.

As soon as possible, work will be begun on the buildings. Mr. Metzger and Mr. Killough are ready to do their part, but Mr. Clagg wants to sell his interest to someone. He feels that at his time of life he does not want to enter upon such an undertaking.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 1, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Captain James M. NORTH bade good-bye to Clinton last Monday and turned his face toward California, where he expects to make his future home should he find that the climate will give him relief from his asthmatic troubles. The probabilities are that he will locate at Los Angeles. Mrs. NORTH will remain in Clinton for the present and till such time as the Captain may determine the point where he will settle. The Captain's many friends bade him good-bye with regret.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 29, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Thomas KEYS came from Kentucky and has been loafing around Clinton for several days. Thomas had blood in his eye and wanted to chaw up a raw Sucker. He got hold of one over by the national bank corner last Monday morning, and as the result of the scrapping match Keys had his eye bunged up, his nose turned into a carmine fountain, and he was badly used up generally. The fighters were arrested and both fined $5 and costs. Keys had no money and swore he would not work out his fine, so the marshal attached a ball and chain to his leg and kept him out on the public square part of Monday and Tuesday. On Tuesday afternoon Keys begged to be released from the ball and chain and promised to go to work on the streets.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 29, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Colonel HARGITT, the venerable tramp printer, spent a couple of weeks in Clinton, and yesterday afternoon he took his flight for Decatur. Over forty years ago the Colonel became a disciple of Faust, and in his early life he was a successful editor of a Democratic newspaper in Indiana. In his early days the Colonel was a man of some note in politics, but whisky got the better of him, and since 1857 he has been a regular tramp printer. He has traveled from one end of the Union to the other, never stopping very long at any one place. He cannot withstand the temptation of money, for as soon as he gets a dollar ahead, he courts his old enemy, and then becomes oblivious to the world. While in Clinton he was the guest of the city for two or three days, during which time he was free from the demands of his boarding-house keeper. The old Colonel is a good workman and were he to leave whisky alone would be a valuable man in a printing office.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 5, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A FARMER CITY BRUTE.

David E. MERCER is an unmarried man of twenty-three years of age, who lives with his father and mother. Mercer has charge of the I. B. & W. water tanks at Farmer City and Mahomet. Living with his father and mother was a poor half-witted girl whom Mercer took advantage of. The girl was sent to the poor farm when her condition became known, and about three weeks ago she became the mother of a child. At the instance of State's Attorney BOOTH, the girl swore that Mercer was the father of her child, and on last Wednesday the warrant was placed in the hands of Sheriff GARDINER, who went to Farmer City and arrested Mercer. The prisoner is now in jail.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 19, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. FLETCHER, of Canton, Kansas, are back again in DeWitt county, visiting relatives and old friends. A few years ago Mr. Fletcher sold his farm in Harp township and moved to Canton, where he and Mr. GREY, formerly supervisor of Rutledge township, formed a partnership in the banking and real estate business. We are glad to know that they are both prospering and are on the high road to fortune.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 19, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. Lucy PORTER, widow of Dr. Edward PORTER, received the glad news last Wednesday that the pension department at Washington had passed favorably on her claim, and that she was allowed a pension of eight dollars a month for herself and two dollars a month for each of her minor children, to date from the time Dr. Porter died. The back pension amounts to nearly $1500. Dr. Porter was a member of the 107th regiment, and while in the service contracted the disease which finally resulted in his death.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 19, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Charles FINFROCK, of Waynesville, seems to be one of the most unfortunate men we know of. About a year ago he lost his pocket-book containing about three dollars in change. A little over a month ago he lost another with sixteen dollars in it, and has never heard from either of them. Then last Saturday morning while driving a cow home he had bought, he lost his watch chain, which was a forty dollar one. It was presented to him by his wife when they were married, and he prized it much more on that account. He did not miss it until reaching home. He, with some others, started in search of it and continued the search Sunday morning until about ten o'clock, when his luck took a turn. He found it in a horse track, close to the road, near John Davis's.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 19, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Drew INMAN has leased the store room now being rebuilt by Mr. METZGER, and as soon as it is ready for occupancy he will open with an entire new stock of goods. Plate glass windows and doors are being put in the front of the building, and the interior will be fitted up in fine style.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 19, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Matt CLINE's family seem to be unfortunate in their use of a gasoline stove. About a year ago a leak in the tank on the stove, from which the fluid flowed freely, caused the tank to melt and set the room in a blaze. Some damage was done to the house and furniture, and his oldest daughter suffered a little from the blaze. On Wednesday of this week, his youngest daughter was preparing dinner on the same stove, and while she was absent from the kitchen, the blaze on the burners went out. The flow of oil was not shut off, so it ran out and filled the pan beneath. When the girl went back into the kitchen she saw that the stove was not burning and she lighted a match to start the burners again without giving a thought to the flow of oil. As soon as the light touched the oil there was an instantaneous blaze which threatened destruction to the house. Although the girl's clothes were on fire, she gave no heed to that but went to work to beat out the fire that was spreading around the stove with a piece of carpet. Some of the neighbors heard her outcries and went to her assistance and put the fire out. Both of the girl's arms were badly burned. The accident cannot be attributed to the stove. It was forgetfulness on the girl's part to see that the keys were all shut and the oil that had flowed out was wiped up before she again attempted to light the burners after they had gone out.

Note: His full name is Mathias Cline, but sometimes his surname appears as Klein.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 19, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Only two of the old members of Co. E, who live at a distance, came to Clinton last Saturday to attend the reunion. The jolly John BOLTON, from Lemont, never misses a reunion, and his old comrades are always glad to see him, for he is as full of life and fun today as when he used to shirk camp duty, but never missed being in the front when a battle was on hand. The other foreigner was Dr. S. M. KING, who came all the way from Albia, Iowa, to meet his old comrades. The King family were among the old settlers of DeWitt county and were loyal to the core. When the first call for troops was made in DeWitt county, Joel S. KING, the father, who was then nearly fifty years old, and his son Sylvester enlisted in Co. E. Another son, Edward H., now a practicing physician in Clinton, Iowa, afterward went to the front with the 107th. Sylvester King fell wounded at the battle of Shiloh with no less than eight holes in his body, and while he was lying on the field another bullet struck him in the foot and came out at the heel. During the fight the Federals retreated from the ground they occupied and Sylvester fell into the hands of the rebels. Fortunately for him, one of his cousins happened to be a member of that company of the Arkansas regiment that captured him, so his wounds were dressed and he was kindly cared for. King was exchanged after awhile and being considered unfit for further duty he was discharged from the service. As soon as he recovered from his wounds he again enlisted, this time in an Ohio cavalry regiment, and served till the close of the war. With his body riddled with rebel bullets he now draws the munificent sum of $6 a month as a pension. He is successful as a medical practitioner and is making money. It was a pleasure to his old comrades to take him once more by the hand. This was his first visit to Clinton since he was mustered out of the service at the close of the war.

Note: The article mistakenly used the name Joel S. King. It should be of Joel E. King.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 26, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Ben DUFF lives on Cornelius COX's farm in creek township. Ben will get full of whisky when he comes to Clinton, and at times does some foolish tricks. Last Saturday he came to town on horseback, and by the time he was ready to go home he was in that condition that in his mind his saddle horse has become transformed into a team and spring wagon, so instead of taking his own horse he drove off Jasper MILLER's team. Duff got home and went to bed, and at a late hour he was aroused by constable MORSE, who went in search of the team. The horses were alright in Duff's stable, but Joe had a duty to perform so he arrested Duff and brought him and the team back to town. Duff Was locked up for the night, but the next morning he was released on his own recognizance, and on Monday morning he appeared before Justice McHENRY. Duff was held in $100 bond for his appearance at the August term of the circuit court. There is no idea that he intended to steal the horses and wagon. Twice before he has been guilty of the same trick when full of whisky. Once he took a team and wagon from the hitch-rack in Decatur, and on his way home the wagon was broken into kindling wood. Duff had to pay $100 for his drunken foolishness that time. As a matter of prudence Duff should swear off from the use of liquor.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 26, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Edward J. KANARY, who for several years past has been a student at St. Viateur's College, at Kankakee, won the gold medal which is annually presented to the student who writes the best treatise on Catholic Church history. The medal is of solid gold, about the size of a twenty-dollar gold piece. The background of the front is of matted Roman gold in the center of which is a circle representing a wreath of wheat. On the center shield is engraved the words "For Church History." On the reverse side of the medal is the inscription, "Presented by Rev. D. Toomey, St. Viateur's College, 1885." On the top is a miter and cross. The medal is suspended to a bar on which Mr. Kanary's name is engraved. It is a handsome bit of work and is an honor to our young townsman who was successful in carrying off the prize. Mr. Kanary is studying for the priesthood. The medal will be on exhibition for a few days at McIntosh & Son's jewelry store.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 26, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Edna THOMPSON is the name of a bright-looking young girl of about fifteen years of age, who has fallen into dissolute habits. She came here from Indianapolis and lived out to do housework. Her dissolute habits had gotten too strong a hold upon her, and she left the place where she worked and laid out in the brush on the outskirts of the town. The other day she was arrested under the vagrant law and put in jail for six days. The girl has a guardian living in Indianapolis and is the owner of some property, and the officers have been trying to get the name of her guardian so that she can be sent home. She appears to have a good education and is an excellent penman.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Rev. Dr. BULL will preach in the Baptist Church next Sabbath, morning and evening.

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Tuesday was the hottest day of the season, and yet the thermometer only registered 90 degrees in the shade.

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The two printing offices in Clinton are assessed for more than the five saloons and the three eating houses.

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Mr. Jacob VOGEL writes from the east to his partner, Mr. O. J. WOODWARD, "I am buying heavy fall and winter goods. Sell all summer goods down low."

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The medical association of this county met in the council chamber in this city on Tuesday. There was a large attendance of the members from all parts of the county.

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Rev. W. A. HUNTER is invited to preach at Heyworth next Sunday, ordain two deacons, and moderate a meeting of the congregation to make out a call for a pastor.

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The farmers are now busy gathering in the harvest. The hay crop is large and the quality extra good. Next week the oats harvest will begin, and promise an abundant yield.

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Just received at J. F. MILLER's, a large lot of importer's samples of parasols, which he has placed on sale at half price. Call early and secure a big bargain, as they will last only a few days.

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The Clinton Cornet band has this week bought two new instruments, an E flat silver cornet for the leader and an E flat clarionet. The band has now an almost complete set of new instruments.

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THE PUBLIC is under obligations to Mrs. C. P. RICHARDS for some very fine red and black raspberries, and to Mr. William HABERFIELD, the jolly Englishman of Texas township, for a hind-quarter of lamb.

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The jurymen who are summoned to deal out justice fairly and impartially at the August term of the circuit court, will receive two dollars a day for their services and ten cents a mile to pay for railroad fare.

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Sarah F. FORCE fell down in a fit on the sidewalk at the corner of SCHMITH's jewelry store, on Tuesday evening, and was unconscious for some time. She was taken to Mrs. CATTERLIN's boarding-house.

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Mertie HANGER, the little twelve-year-old daughter of the marshal, was scalded on her right leg, from the knee down, on Tuesday morning. The girl was lifting a kettle of boiling water from the stove, when by a mishap the kettle upset.

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The bell for the town clock on the new Presbyterian Church arrived on Wednesday, and will be put up as soon as the tower is ready for it. It weighs fifteen hundred pounds.

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Hugh MAGILL has a half-mile race track in a field beyond his mother's residence. On Monday evening while driving a horse around the track he was thrown from the sulky and suffered severe injuries. He will probably be laid up for some time.

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The board of supervisors met last Monday for the transaction of business and got through its work in one day. The main business was the equalization of the assessment, and as the committee had all this done beforehand, it left very little work for the board.

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Mr. William E. KIRKER, of Lincoln, Neb., made but a brief visit to Clinton last week. On his way home he spent a day in Bloomington, and the probabilities are that he may leave Lincoln at no distant day and take up his residence in Bloomington. Mr. Kirker owns some valuable property in Clinton, and it would be an advantage to him to live nearer to it.

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Clinton was invaded last Friday night by members of the Masonic fraternity from Centralia, Maroa, Kenney, Waynesville and DeWitt. As the doors of the lodge were closed to newspaper reporters our ignorance of what was done will be excuse for a mere mention of their coming. The fraternity must have had a jolly time judging from the late hour at which the conclave broke up.

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A basket meeting will be held near the SWISHER school-house in Harp township, on Saturday and Sunday, July 18 and 19. Elder L. S. HITCHENS, pastor of the DeWitt circuit, will have charge of the exercises, and will be assisted by eminent speakers and workers from abroad. Sunday afternoon will be devoted to exercises for and by the children. All are invited.

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In about four weeks more the county fair will be open. We hope that our farmers will begin at once to get something ready for exhibition. The committeemen of each township should visit their neighbors and get them interested. The indications are that the exhibit of horses and cattle will be far ahead of any previous years as our farmers have been making great improvement in this class of stock.

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The Catholics of Wapella are making arrangements for a picnic, to be held in JORDAN's grove, on Saturday, August 15, and in the evening it will close with a bazaar and festival in the Passenger House. A number of valuable presents are to be given away. The proceeds will be used in paying for the rebuilding of the parsonage, which was destroyed some months ago by fire.

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William HOYT was paralyzed about a year ago and was sent from Farmer City to the poor-house. He has an uncle living in Iowa who notified the county authorities that if the county would pay Hoyt's railroad fare out to Iowa, he (the uncle) would relieve the county of any further charge of him. It will cost about $25 railroad fare, and the board of supervisors ordered that it be paid.

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Henry C. WILSON could not be contented away from Clinton, so he gave up his situation as a traveling salesman for a Chicago wholesale grocery and came back to clerk in the store of which he was the proprietor for so many years. Mssrs. HARDIN & HITCH are fortunate in securing Mr. Wilson's services, for he was always popular with his customers and has a host of friends in Clinton.

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Fine MORGAN has been furnishing the prisoners in the jail with chewing tobacco, and thinking that the county ought to pay for such luxuries for the county boarders, he presented a bill to the board of supervisors for twenty-five cents worth of tobacco. The board considered that as the county furnished fruits and spring chickens for the prisoners, it must draw a line somewhere on luxuries, so the bill was rejected.

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Mr. David BOSSERMAN and his son-in-law, Mr. William H. MYERS, have recently formed a company with three other capitalists in Superior, Neb., for the purpose of engaging in the banking business. The new bank will start with a cash capital of $50,000, and as all the parties interested have abundant means it will be a strong financial institution. The men who have gone from DeWitt county to the younger states seem to be coming to the front very rapidly.

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Clinton is to have a laundry. Mr. Nels LONSTROM, from Chicago, has leased the basement under the DeWitt County National Bank, and by next Monday he will be ready for business. A laundry ought to pay in Clinton, for every family knows how difficult it is to hire any one to do washing. The price list shows that Mr. Lonstrom's charges will be reasonable, and a liberal reduction will be made for family washings. We hope the enterprise will succeed.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

LOST—A large red pocket-book, E. T. KENNEY's name written on it with ink, containing $30 and upwards in money, a lot of C. AULTMAN & Co.'s notes and receipts, two expense statements, and other valuable papers. It was lost somewhere on the road around from Clinton to the MAGILL farm, 4 miles north of DeWitt, from there to DeWitt and from DeWitt back to Clinton. Any person finding and returning same to WOY & SCOTT, Clinton, will be amply rewarded. —D. S. HUTCHISON

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Saturday night concerts by the Clinton cornet band, makes the public square the center of attraction, and every body that can get out is sure to come up town on Saturday evening to hear the fine music. The concert generally lasts for about an hour and a-half, and as the band is in good practice and adds to its repertoire all of the latest music, the entertainment furnishes quite a treat. On last Saturday evening it seemed as if all Clinton was out, and besides there was quite a number of families from the country who came to town to enjoy the music. These concerts will be continued during the summer months.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HIGHWAY ROBBERY.

On Tuesday evening a farm laborer named Harry CARENS came to Clinton and notified the city marshal that he had been "held up" on the railroad between Clinton and Wapella and robbed of a silver watch. Carens had been at work near Heyworth and came into Wapella on Tuesday, where he spent most of the day in a drunken carouse with John BARTON and a man named WINKLE. In the evening he started to walk to Clinton on the railroad track, and he claims that he was followed by Barton and Winkle, who took his watch from him. Carens and ex-marshal MOFFETT went back to Wapella that night but failed to find the reputed highway robbers.

[see July 24, 1885]

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

There will be a basket out-door meeting, at the Fairview Church, situated at the mouth of Longpoint Creek in Waynesville township, on Sunday, July 19th. Preaching by Elder J. V. BEEKMAN, at 11 A.M. and 4 P.M. Subject: "Ingersollism, or Defense of Christianity." Elder Beekman is one of the finest orators in Central Illinois. Pleasant Grove for the meeting; plenty of water for man and beast. All are invited.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

PERSONAL.

Mr. George CORDER has gone east to visit his friends.

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Miss Kate FORD is in the city visiting her uncle, Mr. J. W. BOWREN.

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Mesdames A. M. and R. SACKETT, visited Bloomington on Wednesday.

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Mr. J. B. PUTNAM, of Kansas, is in this county visiting the HARROLD family.

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Mrs. John WARNER and Mrs. A. R. PHARES are visiting in Chicago this week.

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Mrs. George GREY, of Bloomington, is in Clinton visiting her aunt Mrs. R. BUTLER.

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Mr. Hiram McINTOSH started yesterday morning on a visit to his old home in the State of New York.

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Mr. Wesley LEAVITT went to Minneapolis this week to see the town. If he likes it he may sink a coal shaft there.

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Mrs. Sarah KIRKLEY and Mrs. L. K. ROSE and her daughter, Nora, have gone to Toledo, Ohio, on a visit to Mrs. Kirkley's sons.

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Miss Maggie SCHRYER, of Fort Erie, Canada, is in Clinton the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. GIBSON. Miss Schryer is a sister of Mrs. Gibson.

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Johnny SHARP, a printer who has been working in the REGISTER office for the past year, left Clinton this week for Indianapolis to work in his father's printing office.

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Mrs. A. C. HOSMER and her two children arrived in Clinton from Red Cloud, Neb., yesterday morning. They will remain here for a couple of weeks, the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. MORSE.

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Mrs. J. R. JONES came home to spend the summer with her parents. Mr. JONES is now engaged in business in Springfield, Missouri, and if the future promises as well as the present, he may locate there permanently.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A former Clinton boy, Will C. CAMPBELL, has for a number of years past been living in Belle Plaine, Kansas, engaged in business. A few months ago he, with some others, started a Democratic paper in that town, which is meeting with good success considering its politics in a Republican state like Kansas. Will has a good many friends in Belle Plaine and they are now making an effort to secure for him the appointment of postmaster. We hope they will succeed, for THE PUBLIC always takes pleasure in the prosperity of the boys who have gone forth from DeWitt county to seek their fortunes in the world. As the appointment of a postmaster to the Belle Plaine office is in the hands of the Hon. A. E. STEVENSON, Will's chances seem to be reasonably good, for Mr. Stevenson had no warmer adherent to his political fortunes in this congressional district than Mr. Lewis CAMPBELL, Will's father.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

GRAND JURORS FOR THE AUGUST TERM.

At the meeting of the board of supervisors the following named gentlemen were selected to serve as grand jurors for the August term of the DeWitt county circuit court:

Tunbridge—Benj. HOWARD, W. R. FERGUSON
Texas—O. W. BURNS, Wm. HABERFIELD
Creek—J. H. MILLER, John SIMPSON
Nixon—A. VANDAVER
Barnett—Samuel McCULLOUGH, Willis BALL
Clintonia—M. S. HENDRICK, Jacob VOGEL
Harp—G. W. NIXON, Jacob MAY
DeWitt—James NELSON, William WILSON
Waynesville—W. P. GAMBREL, W. H. OGLEVIE
Wapella—Jacob PARLIER, S. S. COEN
Wilson—G. W. BELL
Rutledge—O. T. GEER
Santa Ana—Charles EARNHART, J. H. DAVIDSON

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The board of Supervisors of this county appropriates a certain sum each year to each township for medical services, and the supervisors generally divide the amount among the physicians living in the township who will agree to attend to the pauper practice. Last year Supervisor PARLIER made an arrangement with Dr. POTTER and Dr. DAVIS to attend to the poor practice in Wapella township, and each was to have one-half of the sum appropriated. After the arrangement was made, Dr. Davis took his son into partnership with him, and then at the close of the year insisted that Dr. Potter should only have one-third of the money and that he and his son were entitled to two-thirds. Dr. Potter could not take that view of the case, so the result is the money is yet in the hands of the supervisor. At the meeting of the board on Monday, Supervisor CRUM offered a resolution that unless the doctors could agree at once the money should be conveyed back into the county treasury.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

About three years ago, Mr. Dennis BRADLEY came to Clinton from Decatur to open a branch of the New York Store for a Decatur firm. When he first came here it was prophesied that the firm would soon tire of the experiment of another dry goods store in Clinton, as it was then thought that there was no more business in that line than could be done by the houses then in existence. Mr. Bradley made the New York Store a success, and in a little more than a year from the time he came here, he and his brother Bernard bought the stock and started out under the firm name of Bradley Bros. The store that was first started as an experiment is now one of the leading business houses in Clinton, and the Bradley Bros. rank as two of the most enterprising young men in the city. They are untiring in their efforts to please their customers, and as they adopted the cash system from the start, they lose nothing by bad debts and therefore can sell at smaller profits than those who do a credit business. It is a pleasure to note the success of these young men.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Wm. DOMINY, one of the bricklayers who came here from Streator to work on the Presbyterian Church, was arrested last Friday at Bloomington, on a warrant sworn out by J. H. TAGGART, for stealing the architect's plan of the church. Dominy was discharged from the job a few weeks after he came here, and when he quit the plans were missing. There was no proof that he took them beyond the statement of a prostitute, who swore on the trial before Judge McGRAW that Dominy told her he took them. Dominy swore as positively that he did not, and as there was no evidence to corroborate the statement of the girl, Judge McGraw dismissed the case.

[see July 24, 1885]

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE ASSESSOR - VALUE OF THE WEALTH OF THE COUNTY.

Below we give the consolidated statement taken from the reports of the assessors of the several townships in the county. While the assessors put a valuation on the real and personal wealth of the county at only $4,576,745, yet the real value would amount to at least five times that amount if every dollar's worth of property was fairly scheduled.

There are 239,529 acres of improved land in the county, the average value per acre of which is $13.16.

The total assessed value of the improved land is $3,152,033.

Of improved land there are 13,432 acres, of which the average value per acre is $6.88.

The total assessed value of unimproved land is $92,187.

Making a grand total of 252,961 acres of land in the county, at an assessed value of $4,244,220.

In the county there are 3146 improved town and city lots, the average value of which is $118, making a total assessed value of the whole $371,792. And of unimproved town and city lots there are 872, the average value per lot being $15.32, and the total assessed value $13, 362.

The total assessed value of real and personal property in DeWitt county is $4,576,745, of which $947,371 is on personal and $3,629,374 is on real estate, including farms and town property.

The assessors return 1557 dogs in this county.

The city of Clinton is the only town in the county that can afford to wear diamonds. The assessor dug out $112 worth of the sparklers.

The personal property in this county has fallen off $72,916 from the assessment of last year.

Each year shows a marked increase in the number of horses and cattle, but a decrease in their assessed value. In 1884 there were 7564 horses, valued at $221,642, and 14,448 cattle valued at $170,004. This year there are 8306 horses valued at $221,027, an increase of 742 in the number of horses and a decrease of $615 in the assessed value from 1884. There has been an increase of 1377 head of cattle over last year and a decrease of $172 in the assessed value. This would show that the assessors deal gently with the farmers.

The average value of improved lands in 1884 was $15.53 per acre. This year it has been reduced to $13.16.

The average value of unimproved land was reduced sixty cents per acre from last year.

[Note: Don't try to check their math, because none of it works out right.]

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

"Mamma! Come and see the nice dudes that followed us home," was the exclamation of a couple of young ladies who are visiting in Clinton, on their arrival at home last Monday evening. The young ladies are strangers in Clinton and were out in the evening taking a walk when two young men, who ought to know better, followed them for the purpose of forcing an acquaintance. What must be the opinion of those young ladies of the gallantry of the young men of Clinton? It may be a laughable matter for the young men, but their unmanly conduct should bring the blush of shame to their cheeks.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

An effort was made by Colonel Pash WARNER to secure to Clinton the annual encampment of the state militia for this year, and on his invitation General VANCE came to this city and examined the grounds that were gratuitously tendered for that purpose. As there was a strong effort in other directions to secure the encampment Gen. Vance could only promise that the advantages of Clinton, which he admitted were extra good, would receive due attention. But the larger cities seem to offer greater attractions, so one division will be encamped at Springfield and the other at Ottawa.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WON'T PAY THE CORONER.

To hold the office of coroner of DeWitt county is not a very profitable job. Except when we have an occasional suicide, that officer has not much to do, and when he does hold an inquest it is worth the fees to collect them from the county. The law requires the coroner to hold inquests in certain cases for the protection of society, and the law fixes the fees he shall receive for his services. It would be fair to presume that the county should pay for such official duties the same as it pays other county officers. The board of supervisors, however, takes a different view of the matter, and whenever the coroner presents a bill for holding an inquest there is always haggling over it. The board contends that the family of the deceased, if they are financially able to do so, must pay the cost of holding the inquest. The law demands the holding of the inquest, not the family, then why should the family pay the expenses? When sudden or violent death takes from the family one of its members the expenses incident to funeral expenses is certainly heavy enough to be borne without the county also compelling them to pay the coroner's fees for holding an inquest. Why rob the widow and orphan? Certainly DeWitt county is able to pay the few dollars expense incurred to satisfy the demands. The board of supervisors should pay all just bills and stop such picayune business. The coroner is entitled to the fees of his office.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE BILLARD PARLOR.

The Monarch billiard parlor, East Washington street, will be open tonight. It is equipped with five excellent tables of the celebrated Brunswick make. The Monitor reporter, who dropped in with a dull "thud" yesterday, was astonished at the magnificence and general splendor of the place. The floors are covered with elegant carpets. The furniture is new and neat and the general appearance of the place must fill the beholder with admiration. The parlors are in every respect the equal of the best club rooms and must become very popular. The grand opening tonight will, no doubt, bring together the admirers of the game in this city. A splendid cue will be given to the best amateur player, which the reporter had the pleasure of inspecting. Mr. RAZEY certainly has a bonanza. —SPRINGFIELD MONITOR, July 14, 1885

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ABOUT CLINTON.

The Rev. J. MONTGOMERY, who was pastor of the M. E. Church in this city over a quarter of a century ago, when the congregation worshiped in the old frame church which is now occupied by Mrs. S. C. ADAMS as a residence, was in Clinton on the Fourth of July and preached in the M. E. Church on the next day (Sunday). Mr. Montgomery wrote some pleasant words about Clinton for the Bloomington Bulletin, which we take pleasure in transferring to THE PUBLIC. The following is the article:

It was a wise arrangement that the railroads adopted, giving the people the advantage of going abroad at half fare to see friends and spend the day of Independence. Your correspondent was at Clinton, DeWitt county, not for a celebration of the Fourth, but called there for clerical services on the 5th. Clinton was crowded. It seemed as if they were all there from its surroundings. The orator of the day was one of Clinton's own make, having gone out from the office of Hon. C. H. MOORE a fully developed lawyer some years ago, and stands now like Israel's first king, head and shoulders above many of his legal brethren. Springfield, our capital, has reason to be proud of so able a lawyer as Mr. GREEN. Of course the oration was a good one. The "fireworks," as they were called, in the evening were extra good and drew or detained an immense crowd of spectators. "Washington on horseback," the last of the performance, excelled everything of the kind we ever saw. Clothed in purple and blue he was elevated some fifteen or twenty feet, sufficiently high for all to see the grand affair. I have doubts if a more attractive fire exhibit was given any where. Clinton has improved in the last few years very much. The machine shops of the Illinois Central railroad are located here, and they have at least one foundry and machine shop, two good flouring mills and some other works that add to the interest of their growing city of a little upward of three thousand inhabitants. There are some six churches, including the colored people, and just not the Presbyterians are in the act of building a new house of worship, the estimated cost of which is $10,000. The Methodists have a large and nice church edifice for such a town. They have two weekly papers and are trying to keep up in spirits and enterprise with their neighbors. Some of their oldest citizens still live. A few may be given: John CAMPBELL, now over ninety years of age; Esq. McGRAW, a venerable man, on whose white head time is making her marks; then we name C. H. MOORE, Esq., from whose legal office some good lawyers have gone out, and among whom, I believe, they number Saturday's orator; and Col. T. SNELL, the banker, is numbered among the old citizens. To this list of old citizens may be added, George W. GIDEON, Aaron NAGELY, Dr. WARNER, Henry TAYLOR, Dr. GOODBRAKE, Henry CRANG, the old merchant, and John WIGHTWICK and others. While Clinton does not boast of a fine college or university, it has many fine residences, beautiful yards, and finely cultured families, that rank high in society and exert a fine influence upon their people. We found an open door and hearty welcome at Mr. J. Wightwick's, who, with his kind family, made our stay over Sabbath a very pleasant one. It is hoped that our visit to Clinton, and pulpit administration, were as pleasant and profitable to the church and congregation as it was to ourselves.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

(see history of Clinton M. E. Church)

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Lou McIRVIN left for Central America a few days since, whither he goes in the interest of a company of Chicago capitalists, who are largely engaged in the fruit business. Lou, we believe, is to assist in superintending the construction of a railroad and in other responsible positions [which] serve the company. While we will of course miss the genial face of our old-time friend, we are glad to know that he has been promoted, and we doubt not his capabilities will be appreciated. Lou is full of energy and grit, and will be apt to be successful. —The Alachua Advocate

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HOUSEHOLD PESTS.

A band of confidence operators, with a brand-new scheme, has been let loose in this vicinity to prey upon and annoy our housekeepers. The operators are generally women, although employed and directed by an agent of the other sex, and their method of procedure, as explained by several ladies who have been victimized, is as follows:

These women call at private residences and maneuver to get access to the kitchen, where they introduce the subject of baking powders, inquiring the kind used in the family. Being shown the can, perhaps a fresh full one, they volunteer to "test" it to ascertain its qualities. Their "test" consists of placing the can on a hot stove or over a lamp or gas jet. If the baking powder is good for anything the heat will, of course, expel the gas, which, being ammoniacal or carbonic, is apparent to the sense of smell. The claim is then made that this odor indicates something detrimental, although, as a matter of fact, a baking powder that would give off no gas when subjected to heat would be without leavening power and valueless. Circulars are left with the housekeeper condemning the brand of baking powder tested, and putting forth the claims of some other brand as the "only pure," etc.; or the new baking powder is offered for sale, or orders are taken for it to be turned over to the family grocer. Were this the whole of the trick, housekeepers would not often be deceived. Every intelligent person knows that baking powder is not made to be used in this way, but in a mixture with flour and water, where its action is entirely different from that produced by dry heat. But the chief object of this jugglery is to destroy the baking powder given for testing; or by heating it to drive off its leavening gases, and so weaken it that when used it will fail to work. At the next baking there is heavy food, of course, and the tramp probably gets the credit of having told the housekeeper a valuable fact, instead of having spoiled her baking powder, as was actually the case. The average "tramp" will, in this way, destroy from fifty to seventy-five pounds of baking powder a day. A second method of spoiling for use the baking powder in a kitchen where they are not permitted to experiment with it, is by dexterously throwing in a the can a small quantity of salt, soda, or powdered lime. Again, should there chance to be no baking powder in the house, the operators will produce, of the kind used by the family, a sample that has been purposely adulterated or "doctored" to make such an exhibit as they desire under the so-called test. The only way to protect our food from being contaminated by tramps of this kind is to turn all persons who wish or attempt to tamper with it unceremoniously from the door, and to use those articles, only, which experience has proved satisfactory, or the official tests have established as pure and wholesome.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HILLY GROVE.

Weather damp, poor haymaking.

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O. W. BURNS has harvested his wheat. He says that he never had better headed grain.

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Andrew HALL and family visited relatives near Wapella last Sunday.

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F. E. BEAL, of Slab Town, was in Hilly Grove last Sunday.

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Misses Josie and Florence BAKER, of Clinton, visited their sister, Mrs. Thos. SPENCER, last Sunday.

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Mrs. L. B. SPENCER, from near Clinton, visited her son, Thos. SPENCER, last Sunday.

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Crooked Lane broke loose last Sunday and everybody came to Hilly Grove to Sunday-school. There would have been a good Sunday-school but our worthy superintendent failed to be with us and we had to do without prayer. Girls don't let the Jersey lilies get away with you.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DEWITT.

Considerable corn being marketed. Price 38 to 45.

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Mr. Geo. LEMON is very low.

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Messrs. McCONKEY and CHAPIN each sport a "Phantom."

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The town hall is a thing of the past.

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Dwight NIXON enjoyed the festive scenes of this gay village on Tuesday.

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H. LeFEBER, our agricultural dealer is doing a huge business in the farm implement hosiery[?]. Sold five mowers this week.

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The festival held here Tuesday evening, was a very enjoyable affair, the ladies realizing about $40.

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BROWN & O'NEIL have just received their new delivery wagon, manufactured by KING & DUPREE, and will deliver goods within the limits.

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Miss Maggie HITCHINS is residing with her parents, her school having closed last week.

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Rev. TAYLOR, of Leroy, is visiting his son, E. M. TAYLOR, M. D.

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Rev. MADDEN will conduct the morning and evening services at the M. E. Church, next Sunday.

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Quite a number of our citizens attended the children's day exercises at Parnell, and report an enjoyable time.

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Sunday the 26th, the M. P. Sunday-school intends celebrating children's day, with appropriate exercises in the morning, afternoon and evening, conducted by Rev. HITCHINS.

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Misses Agnes and Sidney FRISTOE, formerly of this place, later of Melvin, are visiting relatives this week.

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As Mr. FOSNAUGH intends removing his stock of goods to Clinton at an early date, he desires all who are indebted to him to call at once and settle.

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Wm. WOODS was arrested Thursday as d. and d., and received a fine of $3 and costs.

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Chas. RICHTER is manufacturing a first-class article of tiling this summer. The farmers who had their land tiled were greatly benefited by not being seriously damaged by the late heavy rains.

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This village would afford a good opening for some rising young pettifogger, judging from the number of cases that appear daily before the J. P.

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The election for the location of the new school house, on Thursday, resulted with a majority of ten in favor of the block owned by Mr. PARKER, situated in the east part of town.

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Our citizens would be greatly pleased if the marshal would suppress the yelling and horse racing nightly practiced on our streets. Fast and reckless driving was the cause of quite a number of persons being injured while crossing the streets.

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It is reported that Mac TOLISON, a blind man of this village, has been swindled out of about five hundred dollars by a saloon keeper from Monticello, by the name of J. W. ELSEA. The people are very much exasperated over the affair.

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A motion will be presented to our board of trustees to purchase a patrol wagon, as the farmers are becoming disgusted with the habit of using their wagons to haul the drunks to the C. O. D.

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The citizens and merchants wish to extend their thanks to the members of the band for the beautiful evening concerts furnished by them. DeWitt can justly claim one of the finest trained bands in this part of the state.

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The M. E. Sunday-school attendance is increasing rapidly. As they have received a fine lot of charts, papers, etc., they intend making the school an interesting success. One of the interesting features of the school is the infant class, taught by Mrs. KING, numbering from 25 to 30. It is appropriately designated as the sunbeam class.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

KENNEY.

Items scarce.

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Wednesday was the hottest day of the season.

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Hay harvest is the order of the day.

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Squire PERSINGER was in town last week.

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SPILMAN & Co. have painted their store building.

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The Kenney fire company did well Tuesday evening in drilling.

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Newton PERSINGER was in Kenney Sunday.

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W. B. RUNDLE, of Clinton, was in town one day this week.

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Mr. K. P. TAYLOR, of Eureka, is holding a Sunday-school institute in the Presbyterian Church.

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Dave RANDOLPH, of Midland, was in Kenney Tuesday.

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C. H. GARRABRANT and wife were in Clinton Saturday.

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J. M. RANDOLPH was in Clinton last Monday.

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There was a lawn sociable at the residence of Dr. W. H. OWSLEY last Monday night.

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D. W. SCOTT is hauling the lumber for his new barn.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

Mrs. E. B. HARROLD and daughter, Jole, are visiting A. ALEXANDER's family.

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S. M. THORP returned home from Texas Thursday.

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A good many around here are being prosecuted for allowing their stock to run at large.

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Samuel WILSON & Sons have bought lots of C. C. SMITH and will erect cribs on them and buy grain and stock.

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NELSON & POTTER are offering fruit jars cheaper than any firm in the county.

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Mrs. J. T. WILEY and children visited O. C. IVES this week.

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Mrs. E. W. SWEARINGEN returned from Canton this week.

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A gentleman from Decatur started a writing school at the school-house Thursday.

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The young people had a dance and ice cream party at A. NEWTON's Wednesday night.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 17, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

LETTER LIST.

List of letters remaining in the post-office at Clinton, DeWitt county, Ill., July 17, 1885:

ANDERSON, Fred DUNMORE, J H HERMAN, John Pop Factory [?]
ANDERSON, Mrs Prof DRURY, Lucinda HALL, Frank POLKER, P.
ANDERSON, Mary C. DAVIS, Martha JOHNSON, Mrs Gus POWERS, Thomas
BROWN, Ellen EVANS, Chas JONES, Minnie ROGERS, Annie
BRADFORD, Martha FOSTER, Chas JACKSON, Louis RAYL, Jas (2)
BUTLER, Thos FLINN, Alice KING, Mrs. M M SMITH, Mary E
BROOKS, Eddie R GLENN, Wm (2) KNOX, Ida SCOTT, Maud
BRITTENHAM, Mrs H L GRISWOLD, Flora KALLISTER, Jno SMITH, S H
BRALLIER, Peter GANNON, Ann KORENSEN, Jno THOMPSON, Ben
BRADFORD, G H HERSHEY, Jno McKINNEY, Lizzie WEST, Ida
BALEY, Elizabeth HULL, Thos McKINNEY, Hannah WILDER, N
CURTIS, Ella HOWSER, Martha McKINLEY, Jas WILSON, Carrie
CONNER, Dr J C HILL, C B MARS, Dora WRENDLE, W B
CAMPBELL, F S (2) HENDERSON, Joe D OLIPHANT, Ida WOOLEY, Joseph

Persons calling for above letters please say "advertised," and give date. —Richard BUTLER, P. M.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Eddie BUCK was starting for home from town on last Saturday night, on horseback, when his horse slipped and fell and came down with heavy force on the boy's right leg. Fortunately Mrs. Drew INMAN was driving past in her buggy, and she got out and picked up the boy, and getting him into the buggy, drove around to Mr. INMAN's store. Dr. WILCOX was immediately summoned. He examined the boy's leg and found that the knee was badly bruised but no bones were broken. The doctor prescribed a lotion for the bruised leg, and then Mrs. Inman drove the boy home to his mother's residence, nearly a mile west of town.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Wm. STINE, one of the workmen employed on the new Presbyterian Church, was badly injured on the head last Friday afternoon. He was at work on the top of the brickwork on the tower of the church when a piece of scantling, about ten feet in length, fell from the scaffolding above and struck him on the top of the head, inflicting a serious scalp wound. The force of the blow would have hurled Stine from the tower to the ground, a distance of about sixty feet, had he not fortunately had his arms clasped around a piece of timber which he was holding in place while the men above were fastening it. A man standing beside Stine grabbed him as soon as he was struck and held him on the tower till assistance came.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Two years ago Willie SHANKS, then but about twelve years old, was arrested in Farmer City on the charge of breaking into a millinery store and stealing some goods and money, in all about three dollars worth. On being questioned by Sheriff GARDINER, after his arrest, if he had ever stolen any thing before, the boy boasted that he had often gone into the same store and stolen small articles. When arraigned in the circuit court, he plead guilty, and was sentenced to the Reform School for one year. His year's confinement seems to have been ineffectual in teaching Willie that honesty is the best policy, for this week he was again arrested on the charge of stealing a silver watch from Frank METRIZER. Willie confesses the theft. He is now in jail and will be tried at the August term of the circuit court. As the value of the watch is only about ten dollars he can only receive a jail sentence for his crime. The boy has started fair for a convict's life.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ARRESTED FOR HIGHWAY ROBBERY.

Last week we gave a short account of a highway robbery that was committed on the Illinois Central railroad track between this city and Wapella. Henry KARNES, the party who was robbed had been at work on a farm near Heyworth, and came to Wapella on a spree. John BARTON, one of the notorious Barton family, George WINKLE and William LANHAM, drank and kept company during the day with Karnes and in the evening when Karnes started to walk to Clinton the trio followed him and robbed him of a silver watch. As Karnes was considerably under the influence of liquor when he got to Clinton and told his story to the marshal, there seemed to be some doubt in the marshal's mind if it was anything more than the hallucination of a drunken man. The marshal telephoned to Wapella, but got no information from there. That same night Karnes and ex-marshal MOFFETT went to Wapella, but the thieves could not be found. Winkle was afterward arrested, and Lanham was arrested the first part of the week. Winkle has confessed the story of the robbery, and he and Lanham are now in jail. At this writing Barton has not been found.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

With blood in his eye and a murderous revolver in his pocket, William DOMINY, a brick layer who came to Clinton from Streator to work on the new Presbyterian Church, went down to visit his old boss, Mr. Joe TAGGART, last Monday. Dominy got on a spree soon after he came here, for which he was discharged from the work. Shortly afterward the architect's plans of the building disappeared, and Mr. Taggart suspected Dominy of taking them. Dominy went to Bloomington to work, and last week Mr. Taggart had him arrested for stealing the plans and brought back to Clinton. On his trial before Justice McGRAW, Dominy was acquitted, as the only witness against him was a prostitute who said Dominy had told her that he had taken the plans. Dominy felt bitter towards Taggart for having him arrested, and last Monday, when full of whisky, he went to the church and began a row with Taggart. Dominy drew a six-shooter from his pocket and cocked it and then took aim at Taggart, who was only a few feet from him but fortunately did not pull the trigger before he was disarmed by the men at work on the building, who went to Mr. Taggart's rescue. Dominy was arrested and taken before Justice McHENRY on the charge of assaulting Taggart, for which he was fined five dollars and costs. We understand that the state's attorney will have him indicted at the next term of the grand jury for carrying weapons.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

J. W. ELSEA is evidently a bad man. He came from Monticello to the village of DeWitt and started a saloon. There is a blind boy living in DeWitt named CALLISON whom Elsea endeavored to outrageously swindle. He persuaded Callison to enter into partnership with him in the saloon business, representing that he had a large stock on hand and that he was making money. For a half interest he got Callison's note for $500, secured by a mortgage on real estate. Some of Callison's friends learned of the transaction after it was consummated and proceedings were at once begun to make him give up the note and cancel the mortgage. Rather than take the risk of prosecution, Elsea released Callison from his obligations. It turns out that Elsea did not have over $100 worth of stuff in his gin mill. The citizens of DeWitt should notify Elsea that the sooner he leaves that town the better for his health and business. A man who would defraud a blind man is dangerous in any community.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The house occupied by Mrs. MESSER on North Center street, had a narrow escape from cremation last Wednesday morning. From a defect in the chimney, the roof of the back kitchen caught fire, and the blaze was making vigorous progress when it was discovered. Mr. A. D. McHENRY got upon the roof and put out the fire. The damage was but a trifle. The property belongs to Major EMERY, of Maroa.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. E. W. ROWLAND was overcome by the heat the other day while at work in the field, and for nearly five hours he had no use of his feet or of his right arm, and he could not speak. He thinks it was a paralytic stroke from the indications.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Wesley LEAVITT, the owner of the hay press in this city, has made arrangements to move from Clinton to St. Paul, Minn., next week, where he will engage in business with some Bloomington men who have recently gone to St. Paul. For several years he has been engaged in the hay business in this city, which has been very profitable to him, and the only reason he now leaves is that he believes a change of climate will be beneficial to his wife's health. His coming here was a great benefit to the farmers, as through him they had a paying market for their hay. Prior to Mr. Leavitt putting up a hay press in Clinton, the only demand the farmers had for their hay was merely local, and when the crop was large, they got but a small price for it. We hope that some enterprising man will buy the press and continue the business.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The friends and relatives of Mac CALLISON have decided that he is incompetent to manage his finances, and will have a conservator appointed at this term of court.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Jim ALLEN got full of whisky last Tuesday and Officer STOREY run him in. Jim would not go peaceably so Officer Storey pummeled him over the head with his billy and felled him to the ground. Jim was not able to work the streets to pay his fine on account of the injuries he received.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On Friday of last week George H. FICKETT was driving a mowing machine in Mr. ELLIS's field, in DeWitt township, when his team ran away. Fickett was thrown from the machine and a bar on the machine struck him in the side, breaking two of his ribs and tearing open the flesh so that the pulsations of his heart could be seen. Dr. TYLER attended to him and bound up his wounds, and it was thought at the time that Fickett could not recover. Mr. Asa WILSON was in Clinton on Tuesday, and he reported that Fickett was getting better and that all danger was thought to be passed.

[Same date, different page]

On Friday last, George FICKETT, a young man in the employ of Mr. ELLIS, living some four or five miles north of this place, was driving a binder, cutting oats for James DIXON, when the team ran away, throwing Fickett in front of the grain divider which struck him, making a terrible wound in his left side over his heart. He was carried to Mr. SWIGART's house and Dr. TYLER, of DeWitt, summoned, who gave him all the attention possible. On Saturday night he was carried to Mr. Ellis's house, and on Sunday there were hopes of his recovery.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Burglars were around last Monday night. Mr. Emmett KENT's house was ransacked, but with the exception of some eatables which the marauders helped themselves to, nothing was missing. The thieves were not satisfied with taking all they could eat, but they also threw the provisions around on the floor. They had a lot of silverware gathered to carry off, but for some reason they did not take it. The same night Hugh MAGILL's house was entered, and only a pair of pants was carried off.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Lewis HINKLE came in from Harp township last Tuesday and tarried too long at the saloon bars, filling up with beer. A friend of his got into a skirmish and when Marshal HANGER was taking him to prison, Hinkle interfered. After landing his prisoner in the cooler, the marshal went back and arrested Hinkle and took him before Justice McHENRY, where he was arraigned for interfering with an officer in the discharge of his duty. The Justice assessed a fine of $5 and $1.20 for cost, but as Hinkle had blown all his ready cash in the saloons, George MILLER, his father-in-law, went security for the payment of the fine and cost.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

There has been a few sales of town property recently, G. HIDIGER, an engineer on the Central road, bought the SMITH property, opposite Dr. WRIGHT's, for which he paid $750. John D. ROGERS bought from Dr. WARNER the house and two lots on Monroe street, north of the Central railroad, for $750. Mr. Rogers is having the house thoroughly repaired. R. W. ROBINSON also bought from Dr. Warner the lot between his house and Mr. Rogers, paying $200 for it. This is a valuable addition to Mr. Robinson's property.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. John A. PORTER, who lives in Harp township on the Enos CAMPBELL farm, met with a bad accident last Saturday. While standing on a ladder, the bottom of which rested in a wagon, repairing the damage the wind had done to the top of a stack of hay, young Porter started up the team, not knowing that his father was on the ladder, and down came Mr. Porter to the ground with such force that his spinal column was badly injured and one of his arms broken. Mr. Porter will be laid up for some time.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

The farmers are now busy threshing their oats.

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Our city now has two saloons, so all of our thirst can be quenched without going to neighboring towns.

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Mr. HART closed his writing school Tuesday night. Miss Ella CRUM got first prize for improvement.

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Grandma CARLE has gone to Missouri to visit her son.

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Jim McGUIRE moved from here last week between two days.

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Seward NELSON Post will take part in the exercises at Clinton Saturday.

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BUTTERWORTH & Co. have had the roof of their grain house coated with a tar preparation.

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Jim LIGHTHALL has bought the ground and house that he occupies.

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Mrs. GOSSARD and Mrs. STONE of Chicago, visited in Missouri last week and returned Tuesday night.

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Roe NELSON is building a large barn on their farm.

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Rev. BIRELY has been the guest of Rev. READ a part of this week.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DEWITT.

Geo. O'NEIL Sundayed at DARWINs.

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Miss Abbie SHINKLE has been visiting friends the past week.

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Mr. HAYS, of Muncie Ill., is visiting G. B. LEASURE.

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Esq. CHAPIN is at Holder engaged in official duties.

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The election on last Saturday to vote for or against borrowing not to exceed three thousand dollars to build the school house, was carried in favor of securing a loan by a majority of ten.

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Quite a number of our farmers contemplate a western trip through Kansas and Nebraska in a few weeks. Among the number that intend leaving are: J. W. CAIN, Samuel MYERS, Mr. W. NIXON and Carl SWIGART.

Mrs. CASEY and daughter of Wichita, Kansas, are visiting the MEYERS.

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The cold wave that struck this village on last Saturday called for winter clothing, and considerable sickness is reported arising from the disagreeable sudden change.

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Sunday, August 21st, Rev. McELFRESH will occupy the pulpit at this place, Rev. MADDEN officiating at DeLand.

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H. LeFEBER has secured the agency for the Cincinnati buggies, and will have a lot on hand in a few days for inspection.

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The friends and relatives of Mac CALLISON have decided that he is incompetent to manage his finances, and will have a conservator appointed at this term of court.

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Chas. GRIFFIN and wife, who were married in Nebraska some weeks ago, have returned, and will commence housekeeping in the NIXON property.

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Mrs. H. E. BROWN and children, of Carbondale, are here visiting relatives this week.

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H. LeFEBER has contracted during the past week over twenty thousand bushels of oats. Market prices varying from 20 to 23 cents per bushel.

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Owen BROWN will be our drayman in the future, having bought the outfit of Mr. BROOKS. He will be able to attend all calls night and day.

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The Village vs. Stant EMERY case on last Saturday, was an exciting one. Mr. Emery received a fine and costs of $5.45.

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On account of Mr. PARKER being unable to give a clear title to the block selected by the taxpayers, the trustees have decided to locate the school house in the north end of town. This is a very beautiful site, but the location in the north side of the district will render it very inconvenient to pupils living in the south and east.

As the school house is in a fair way of being built at an early date, the directors are anxious that it be commenced immediately, and are waiting for building proposals. Specifications, etc., can be found at either H. MYERS' or A. J. BROWN's stores.

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Geo. FICKETT, a farm had in the employ of J. L. ELLIS, residing about three miles east of this village, was seriously injured by a runaway team of mules attached to a self-binder, on last Saturday. He had three of his ribs broken, and left lung severely cut; the air gushing in and out of the wound at each respiration. He also sustained other injuries of a minor nature. Under the skill of Dr. J. H. TYLER and the kind and careful nursing of Mrs. ELLIS, he is improving.

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Rev. HITCHENS, under the auspices of the G.A.R. Post, will deliver the Gen. Grant memorial sermon at the trick church on Saturday afternoon, at three o'clock.

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Quite a number of DeWitters attended the quarterly and basket meeting at Weldon on Sunday.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

TEXAS.

May apples are ripe.

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A. C. NEWMAN has put up 75 acres of hay.

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El JAMES had a cow killed by lightning last Saturday night.

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Mr. SUMMERS and force are plastering Mr. NEWMAN's house this week.

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Five machines were here this week, three steamers and two horse powers.

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Mrs. Richard OWENS, who has been sick for the past two months, is convalescing.

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N. R. PERSINGER lost a valuable colt last week.

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All the hands, horses, wagons, cooks and everybody were busy last week threshing.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 7, 1885 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

RESURRECTED.

It is more than three months ago that the buildings owned by METZGER and KILLOUGH, on the south side of the public square, went down with a crash one Sunday night and destroyed several thousand dollars worth of property. It was hard on the occupants of the buildings for their loss was total. Old Mr. CLAGG owned a two-thirds interest in the building occupied by Mr. Killough, and Mr. Killough owned one-third. After the accident Mr. Clagg sold his interest to Mr. Killough and then moved out to Iowa to spend the remainder of his days with his children. It was a big load for Mr. Killough to shoulder, considering the large loss to his stock of hardware, but he took up the burden and at once set men at work to rebuild. Last week he had the pleasure of moving back into a better store-room than the one he was so unceremoniously ejected from. While the room is built somewhat on the plan of the old one, yet he has greatly improved it so that it is more adapted to his large business. He was determined that there should not be another such accident, and to avoid it a solid stone foundation was put under the entire building. The floor of the store-room was lowered so as to be on a level with the sidewalk, which gives a greater height to the ceiling, making the room lighter and more cheerful. Mr. Killough has filled up his store with an entire new stock of goods and is doing more business than ever. He deserves to succeed for he has the push and enterprise that knows no such word as fail.

The adjoining room is owned by Mr. Metzger. And what a change he has made in it. The interior of the store is finished off in modern style, and the front has large plate-glass windows and doors. It is now one of the best business rooms on the public square, is well lighted in front and rear, and now has as its tenant Mr. Drew INMAN, the enterprising merchant. Mr. Inman moved in the first part of this week, and when he gets his stock arranged will have as handsome a store as can be found anywhere. Mr. Metzger occupies the second story of the building for his harness business. The front part is the ware-room, and in the back part are the workmen. This room is well lighted in front, on the side and rear, and by a large skylight.

Both of the buildings are a great improvement on the old ones, and while the loss was heavy on Messrs. Metzger and Killough, the new buildings add greatly to the appearance of the south side of the square.

The fall of the buildings made a hole in the bank account of Mr. Henry RENNICK, the owner of DeWitt Hall and the stores under it. The east wall of his building had to be torn down and rebuilt, and under the division wall was built a heavy stone foundation. This makes DeWitt Hall more secure than ever, so that our people need have no fear of attending amusements in the hall. The destruction of those buildings on that Sunday night last April wiped out some six or seven thousand dollars in hard cash. While it was a big loss to the owners of the property, it has turned into a benefit by improving the business property on the square.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 14, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The other day an advertisement appeared in the Bloomington papers for one Maude VILLARS, a young lady who mysteriously left the home of her guardian in Bloomington. The young lady, it appears, came to this city and is now engaged as one of the dining-room girls in the Magill House. Her father and mother died some time ago and left the girl and her property under the guardianship of Dr. WHITE, of Bloomington. Maude's mother was an actress, and the girl naturally inclines to the stage. The reason she gives for leaving her guardian is that she did not want to learn music or be confined to her books. She is a prepossessing-looking girl, but like a majority of girls at her age does not know when she is well off. She passes here by the name of Maude WILCOTT.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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Aug. 14, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WOULD RATHER GO TO JAIL.

There came from the broad prairies that surround the thriving village of Weldon a son of toil, by name Dan McDONALD. He came to gather in the golden harvest from the teeming acres of one of our Clinton nabobs. He worked early and late, and when he counted up his wealth at the close of the harvest season his pockets were bursting with round silver dollars. He came to town on Thursday night of last week and fell in company with a nymph de pave who has brought grief and suffering to many of the tender male plants of Clinton. The pair sauntered out toward Woodlawn Cemetery, which is the trysting place of loafers and prostitutes when the sun goes down, and the silent stars are the only witnesses of the desecration of the place made sacred to the dead. Our vigilant marshal watched the pair as they left the public square, and before they had time to enter the gates of the western part of the cemetery, he had them under arrest. The next day Dan and the girl were arraigned before Justice McHENRY. She was sentenced to sixty days in jail and Dan was fined five dollars and costs. It has been the desire of the city to get rid of this vile strumpet, so Dan offered, if the Justice would suspend the fine and give him and the girl a chance to leave town, nevermore to return, he would take her away. The matter was left to the girl to choose between sixty days in jail or love in a distant city with Dan, and she promptly decided to take her punishment in jail rather then go with her bucolic lover. As Dan had spent all of his wealth gained by hard toil in the harvest field he had no money to settle his fine, therefore he was turned over to the street commissioner to work out the amount on the streets. As soon as Dan had satisfied the demands of the law he shook the dust of Clinton from his feet and departed southward.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 14, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Mrs. C. F. AMSDEN and Miss Nellie MAGILL started yesterday morning on a trip to the celebrated Yellowstone park.

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Mr. GALLAHER came over from Champaign this week to visit his brother and to see how business is running in Clinton.

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Miss May LEWIS, who has been sick for several weeks, went to Chicago yesterday on a visit.

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Mr. Joe FRAMBERS was taken dangerously sick last Monday night, and the indications were this afternoon that his case might prove fatal.

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John DAY, Jr., came home from New Mexico this week. He had been on the sick list for a time and came home to rest and recruit his strength.

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H. L. CHRISTOPHER, of Kenton, Ohio, is visiting at Mr. C. P. SPRAGUE's. Mr. Christopher made the trip from Ohio on a bicycle, and on his journey averaged from seventy-five to one hundred miles a day.

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The grasshoppers have taken possession of some of the clover fields in this part of the county, and are destroying everything in their line of flight. Some of the farmers are not going to cut their clover as the yield will not pay the expense, but will turn their cattle in on it.

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Mrs. Matt CLINE and daughter left last Wednesday for Grand Junction, Iowa, to visit her two sisters wo live in that town. Both of her brothers-in-law, Levi MARTIN and J. HOSHOW, formerly lived in Clinton. From Grand Junction Mrs. Cline will go to Kansas, where she has a sister and brother living.

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Miss Minnie B. POTTER, of Bloomington, a teacher of the piano and organ, will instruct a few pupils in music in Clinton. She will be at Mrs. Henry MAGILL's residence on Monday and Tuesday of each week, where she can be seen. Miss Potter is a pupil of the celebrated H. Clarence EDDY, of Chicago.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 21, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A STRICKEN MOTHER
Three Adult Sons of an Aged Widow Meet Violent Deaths Within Twelve Hours' Time

Martin's Valley, Pa., Aug. 19---Mrs. Sarah TRUBY, of this place, is an aged widow. Her son John, aged thirty-four, worked on the East Branch Railroad; Jason, another son, aged thirty-six, was an employee of the State quarries; Wyman, a third son, thirty-eight years old, was a miller. They lived with their mother, having no families of their own. On Friday night last, John, while running to turn a switch, fell into the cattle guard and broke his neck. On Saturday morning, before the news of John's death reached home, Jason was drowned in a pit in the quarries, recent rains having filled it with water. James W. Whittaker arrived in the village at nine o'clock Saturday morning with the news of John Truby's death, and met Will Jackson, who was bearing the tidings of Jason's fate at the same time. The two walked together to the mill where Wyman Truby worked to break the news to him first. There was a crowd about the mill, and as the two messengers arrived on the scene, men were carrying Wyman Truby's dead body out of the building. He had been suffocated in a grain bin. Less than twelve hours intervened between the death of the first brother and the last one. The news of the death of her three sons so prostrated Mrs. Truby that her life is despaired of. The three bodies will be buried in one grave.

[Note: This story was in the Clinton Public, but it took place in Pennsylvania, so it doesn't really fit the page, but it portrays some of the tragedies that people had to endure back then.]

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 21, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Miss Hepsie BROWN has gone to Chicago to visit her sister, Mrs. John HAND.

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Mr. J. MARIS, landlord of the MAGILL House, came home from Indiana yesterday.

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The Clinton public schools will re-open for the fall term on Monday, September 7.

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Mr. J. F. MILLER went to Ames, Iowa, last Monday to visit his father and mother.

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There are eleven divorce cases to be disposed of during the next term of the circuit court.

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Mr. and Mrs. ROSS, of Mansfield, spent last Sabbath with Mr. and Mrs. Henry RENNICK.

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Dr. J. H. TYLER and Rev. MADDEN of DeWitt, were the guests of Mrs. Henry RENNICK last Monday.

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Rev. J. CADDEN's fall term of German commences, August 24th. A few more scholars can be accomodated.

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The ladies of the W. C. T. U. will serve ice cream and cake in the courthouse park next Thursday night, August 27th.

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The races at the fair next week promise to be the best we have had for years. A number of first-class horses will be here.

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Mr. and Mrs. G. HARTSOCK and their two youngest children left last Monday on a visit to old friends living near Dayton, Ohio.

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C. M. HITER, traveling passenger agent for the Illinois Central railroad, was in town on Wednesday, in the interest of the company.

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Dr. A. D. McHENRY started last Monday for a few weeks vacation from business. He will spend part of the time at Lake Minnetonka.

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At the last meeting of the board of education, Samuel HENSON was elected janitor of the school buildings and grounds, at a salary of $500.

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Sheriff GARDINER and wife and Col. V. WARNER went to Farmer City last Wednesday to attend the funeral of the wife of Dr. J. D. GARDINER.

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Remember that the Clinton cornet band gives an open air concert, on the public square, every Saturday evening. The boys make excellent music.

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Judge HERDMAN will preside during the first week of the circuit court and Judge LACEY will come the second week and finish up the business.

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Lewis HERMON, youngest son of Lewis K. and Theresa P. DURKEE, died Saturday, August 15th, at 11:10 P.M., aged six months and twenty days.

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As DeWitt county can boast of a large number of fine trotting horses, it is expected that the entries for the county purse will be unusually interesting.

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Miss Hulda JOHNSON left Monday morning for Marion, Ind., and from there she will go to Bellafontaine, Ohio, where she will remain several weeks visiting friends.

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Mrs. Sallie WATTS, aged fifty-two years, died at her home in Kenney on last Saturday. She was the mother of

Mr. L. C. WATTS, owner of the Union Block grocery in Clinton.

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You can go from Clinton to Niagara Falls on next Monday evening, over the Champaign and Havana Line for $7.75 for the round trip. Tickets will be good to return on for seven days.

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Joseph M. LYONS, the agent for DeWitt county for "General Grant's Personal Memoirs," has authorized Mr. D.

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F. HECKARD, of Wapella, to receive orders for the book in that township.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 21, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Martin FOX, alias WILSON, who was sent to Joliet about one year ago for stealing hogs from a farmer living near Wapella, was released from the penitentiary last Tuesday. As he was leaving the prison, Press BUTLER, a Bloomington detective, arrested him on the charge of having murdered a man in Tipton, Indiana, some time in the year 1881. Butler took Fox to Tipton, but when he got there it was discovered he was not the murderer. Fox's family came to Clinton to live after he was sent to the penitentiary, and Fox arrived here yesterday.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WEIGHED IN THE BALANCE.

James TAYLOR, who lives in Harp, would not allow his daughter to appear as a witness in a case in which she was subpoenaed. The Judge sent for James and fined him $5 for attempting to obstruct justice.

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George WINKLE and George BARTON were sent to Joliet for one year each for highway robbery. This was the case where Winkle and Barton got a fellow full of whisky and then followed him down the railroad track, between Wapella and Clinton, and robbed him.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Charles ANDERSON was indicted for forgery. He is now in the penitentiary, and as soon as his time is out he will have his trial and return to his present quarters.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Isaiah WILSON stole a hog from his cousin, Hiram Wilson. The offense was proven clearly against him, so the Judge gave him twenty days in jail to get over his appetite for hog meat and fined him $1. As Fine Morgan feeds his guests on roast beef and spring chickens, Isaiah will get accustomed to a different diet than hogs.

William WALLACE, an old veteran of the last war, got into bad habits through his appetite for whisky, and a couple of weeks ago he came to Clinton and forged the name of Mr. Fullenwider, of Wapella township, to a bank check for $33, which Freudenstein & Co. cashed. Wallace was captured soon after the transaction, and on last Monday he was sent to Joliet for eighteen months.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Among the early settlers of Illinois who attended the Atlanta fair, Mrs. Zilla LARGE and Jonathan ARTHINGTON, of this county, were among the twelve who received silver spoons because of their long residence in Illinois. Mrs. Large came to this state in 1821, and Mr. Arthington in 1820. The spoons are solid and bear the inscription, "Snow Birds, 1885." There were at least two hundred old settlers on the grounds who lived in Illinois before the winter of the deep snow.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A warrant was issued on Tuesday morning for the arrest of Jim ALLEN, on the charge of vagrancy. Jim is a chronic loafer, and spends his time loitering around the saloons. Jim heard of the warrant and skipped out, and the hope is that he will never return. This is the first time such a charge has been made in this city. If a few more of the loafers could be got rid of in the same way, it might pay for the marshal to get after them. There be men loafing around the public square who never work, and how they make a living is one of the unsolved mysteries.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Morris HINCHCLIFFE, a son of Mr. Titus Hinchcliffe, an engineer on the Central road, was climbing over the fence at the school-house on Wednesday when his foot caught in the barbed wire, which was placed on top of the palings. The barbs of the wire fastened into his instep and made quite a painful wound. The wire was put on top of the paling a year ago last Fourth of July, when the celebration was held in the school grounds, to keep people from hitching their horses to the fence. Yesterday morning the board of education ordered the barbed wire removed.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

[In case anyone ever wondered when sidewalks came about...]

The city council this year is expending the money in a practical manner, and at the close of the year the people will see what has been done. The macadamizing of Washington street and the laying of a five foot stone pavement on the north side of the same street are improvements that will be lasting and beneficial. Of course it costs more money than the old style of putting down plank walks and running over the roadbed with a grader, but when once done the work is lasting. Stone sidewalks, five feet wide, cost about $1 per running foot, while a plank walk costs only thirty-five cents a foot. The plank walk has to be renewed wholly about every six years, while there is a constant expenditure to keep it in repair. The stone sidewalk is perpetual, and the first cost is the last. There is no danger of accident to life or limb from loose boards, and it is always in perfect order. The city pays two-thirds of the cost of the stone sidewalk, leaving only one-third for the owner of the property to pay. It will not take long for the people to see the superior advantages of stone over plank, hence it will not be many years before all the main streets in the city will have stone pavements. This is a step in the right direction. It will cost more at the present time, but in the future it will be a matter of economy.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 30, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

EDITORIAL COMMENT.

Within the past two weeks Clinton has had forcibly pressed upon its attention the brevity and uncertainty of life. A week ago last Monday a brakeman left the depot in this city with his train. He was young and vigorous, and life to him was bright and rosy. That morning he left his aged mother and wife and child in Springfield. Within half an hour after his train pulled out from Clinton he laid mangled and bleeding by the side of the railroad track, having fallen from the top of a car, and inside of three hours from the time he left Clinton he was brought back to die before the sun went down. Then we have the case of Mrs. Sallie Lisenby, who was in the vigor of young womanhood, suddenly cut off from life. The home she brightened with her presence and the loving hearts that were entwined around her could not lengthen her life one brief moment. In the home of Olof Anderson one life was added, and seven days later the father and head of the household was stricken with death before he had reached the age of forty years. His sickness was brief. And then this morning we have the sad fate of J. T. Myers who fell from the Methodist Church steeple and was dashed to death. A few minutes before he was gaily singing as he mounted the steeple in the course of his work.

These are but samples of the vicissitudes and uncertainties of life, and yet the world rushes on in its mad career for gain, never stopping for a moment to think of what the end must be. Should we not learn a lesson from the surroundings, and determine to make the best of the few brief years that are allotted to us. Let us make the world brighter and better for our living in it instead of looking upon the dark side of everything and making our surroundings gloomy. Let each act of our lives reflect a gleam of sunshine upon those around us instead of trying to cast them down or take advantage of them in the business relations of life. The millionaire and the beggar have the same lease on life, and the grave places all upon a common equality.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 30, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A FATAL FALL.

J. T. Myers Fell From the Methodist Church Steeple This Morning This morning Myers & Sons, painters and decorators, of Decatur, were at work on their contract of painting the outside of the Methodist Church. J. T. MYERS, the foreman, was climbing up the steeple on the south side of the church in order to put a rope over the top of the spire by which they could suspend the platforms on which to stand while painting the steeple. The steeple is one hundred feet high. Mr. Myers was ascending by the aid of climbers fastened to his feet, and as he was going up he fastened a rope around the steeple to aid him. A number were watching him in his perilous feat. When he reached a height of about eighty-five feet his foot slipped and the poor fellow came whirling down. About sixty-five feet up from the ground, at the opening at the base of the wooden part of the steeple, a platform was built. In his fall Mr. Myers struck the platform and went bounding down to the yard below. He held on to the rope he had fastened around the upper part of the steeple till he struck the platform, and it then slipped from his hands. The rope cut through his hands and wrist to the bone. After striking the platform and in his descent to the ground Mr. Myers' body revolved as it was passing through the air. When he struck the ground his body rebounded like a football to at least four feet. He struck on his side and the concussion caused his death within half an hour. His shrieks as he was falling and the shrieks from the bystanders drew a crowd immediately. Mr. Myers was picked up and carried into the south parlor of the church, where he died. The only words he uttered after his fall was a request to his brother to raise up his head. J. T. Myers was born in Decatur and was twenty-four years old. He was married last December. He was a fine-looking young fellow, about five feet ten inches in height, and weighed one hundred and seventy-five pounds. He was of cheerful disposition, and all morning before the accident, while he was at work, he was whistling and singing. His brother, who was at work with him, is frantic with grief. The body was sent to Decatur this afternoon. His father is at present in business in Wichita, Kansas, and a telegram was sent to him at once announcing the sad death of his son. Our citizens did all in their power to assist the brother in his preparations for the return of the body to Decatur.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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Friday, November 13, 1885
The Daily Republican
Decatur, Illinois

Fred SMITH is home from Clinton, whither he went to paint the Methodist church steeple. But Rev. J. P. DIMMITT wouldn't allow him to climb the spire. He said it had caused one death, and he would not risk another life. The steeple has been cut down 38 feet. The pastor and people say the church will look just as well without the spire being so high.

Submitted by Sheryl Byrd

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December 4, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. A. R. PHARES went down to his farm the other day and took with him in his buggy his youngest son and one of Mr. R. A. LEMON's boys. While Mr. Phares was looking around the farm he left the boys sitting in the buggy. The horses became frightened and ran off. Mr. Phares tried to catch them and in the effort he was thrown down and the buggy ran over him, bruising him up somewhat. The boys saw their danger. Phares, a little fellow not more than four years old, got down into the bottom of the buggy and wrapped himself in the lap robe. Young Lemon, who is not more than nine years old, took hold of the reins and guided the horses as they went wildly racing around the field. It was a courageous act on the part of young Lemon, and he succeeded finally in stopping the team without anything being damaged.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 4, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

John W. SHORT sold his house and lot in Lawndale to Mr. Hiram STAMATES, and on Tuesday he and his family left Clinton and started to Circleville, Ohio, where John intends to engage in the saloon business. It will be remembered that John was arrested last week for stealing rails, and Mr. Stamates went on his bond for $50. The conditions were that Short was to leave town and never return. Clinton is well rid of him. He might have done well in Clinton had he attended to his business, but his disposition was to dead-beat everybody who helped him. For more than a year past he has been suspected of petty stealing, and there is a very strong suspicion that he was the burglar who broke into Mayor BISHOP's house a few weeks ago. Clinton's gain in his leaving will be Circleville's loss in his moving there.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 4, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The December term of the DeWitt county circuit court will begin next Monday, with Judge HERDMAN presiding. There are on the docket forty-seven common law cases, sixty-six chancery cases, and eleven on the criminal list. Among the criminal list we find the name of the Rev. Oscar B. THAYER, who was indicted at the last term on the charge of defrauding. There are also seven applications for divorce, which would indicate that all of the DeWitt county matrimonial matches are not made in heaven.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 4, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Locklin ROGERS, a brother of John D. ROGERS, was a member of the Forty-first Illinois Infantry, and was killed at the battle of Fort Donelson. About four years ago his mother made application for a pension, claiming that Locklin at the time of his death was the main support of his parents. This morning she received the papers and vouchers that the pension has been allowed. Mrs. ROGERS will get $2200 back pension, dating from the time Locklin was killed, and $8 a month for the remainder of her life.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 4, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Democrats of DeWitt county were represented at the funeral services of Vice-President Hendricks, which took place last Tuesday at Indianapolis, by F. L. HARPSTER, circuit clerk, C. P. SPRAGUE, Thos. HARP, M. B. SPICER, Elliott JAMES, Curt HALL, B. BURROUGHS, Perry CROSS, Warren HUGHES, and Joseph EBLE. Sheriff GARDINER and A. V. LISENBY, started and got as far as Champaign, but the cars were so crowded that they could not even find comfortable standing room, so they concluded to come back home.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 4, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE OLD LOG JAIL.

In the early days of Clinton, when a log hut was used as a jail for the safe keeping of prisoners, it was no unusual thing for the violators of the law to make their escape from the prison. The old jail stood on the lot where Eugene DAVIS now lives, and was built of roughly hewn logs, and between the logs was plastered with mud to keep out the cold air. They had a camp meeting up at Farmer City, and there was a tall, lean, lank Kentuckian who took a great interest in the services. He was a scalawag of the first water, and the minister and the brethren and sisters were overjoyed at the prospects of his conversion. They prayed and wrestled with him, and, as they thought, had him almost to the gates of glory, when a very slight circumstance changed the scene. The Kentuckian was a wolf in sheep's clothing, and he quietly waited the time when his assumed piety would be made to pay. One day a collection was taken up in which about $40 was contributed by the people to the treasury of the Lord. But it never got there. The Kentuckian watched his chance, and making a sneak on the hat in which was the money, he grabbed it and made a break for the timber. As soon as the hat was missed the meeting became demoralized, and the brethren started in hot pursuit of the thief. He was captured and committed to the old log jail to await the next session of the circuit court. Uncle Jesse WOODWARD had the contract for feeding the prisoners, and as he had a good deal of spare time on his hands at times, when he would take the Kentuckian his dinner he would probably spend the afternoon with him in a social game of "seven-up." The prisoner finally got tired of his confinement, and as he did not relish the idea of going to the penitentiary, he concluded that he would make a strike for freedom, so one day when Uncle Jesse brought him his dinner he skipped out of the door, and, locking it, he left Uncle Jess a prisoner. The fellow made good his escape, and he never came back to Clinton. Uncle Jess was kept prisoner for several hours, and was finally released by his attracting the attention of a passer-by who unlocked the door and let him out.

An insane man was locked up in the jail till arrangements could be made to have him sent to Jacksonville. In those days there were no railroads, and the trip to Jacksonville had to be made by wagon. The man was wild and dangerous in his insanity, and no one could go inside of the building to him. The door was so low that one had to stoop to go in or come out, sot the crazy man had the advantage. He took off his heavy cowhide boots and used them as weapons. With a boot held in each hand he would bring the heavy heels down on every head that protruded inside of the low door. How to get the crazy man out of the log jail to send him to Jacksonville seemed a question not easily to be solved. More than half a dozen had tried to get inside but the heels of the heavy boots were too much for their heads and they were glad to draw out their heads as fast as they poked them in. Finally Marcellus SESSIONS came along, and inquired what all the commotion was about. When the matter was explained to him, in his easy-going way he said, let me try him once. Marcellus stooped down on the ground and watching his opportunity when the crazy man came near the door Marcellus grabbed him by the legs and pulled him out. There was a struggle between the powerful lunatic and Marcellus, but Marcellus overpowered him. The poor fellow was safely bound with ropes, put in the bottom of a wagon and then hauled across the country to Jacksonville.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 4, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HEARD FROM AT LAST.

A few weeks ago Claude PHARES, oldest son of Mr. A. R. PHARES, mysteriously disappeared from his home in this city, and till yesterday no tidings could be gained of him. Naturally his parents felt uneasy about him, but they consoled themselves with the idea that if sickness should overtake him they would soon hear from him. Claude writes to his parents that he is living with a farmer near Home, Marshal county, Kansas, and that he is having a good time hunting prairie chickens and quail. Mrs. Phares was so anxious to see her boy that she took the train last evening for Kansas City, and by this time she will be with him.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Tom HANKS, who burned his way out of the calaboose two weeks ago and skipped out, was recaptured by Marshal HANGER a few days ago and put upon the streets to work out his fine. The grand jury took Hanks in hand and indicted him for malicious mischief, and his case will come before the circuit court next Monday.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Captain SEELEY, of Missouri, lectured in the opera-house last night, under the auspices of the Grand Army of the Republic, on "The Battle of Gettysburg and Prison Life." The audience was not large enough to pay the expenses. The Captain gave a fine description of the battle of Gettysburg, in which he was a participant, but the recital of his twenty months prison life was rather tame. Captain Seeley and Dr. J. A. EDMISTON were both in the same prison for several months.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

L. B. CHENOWITH, for the past twelve or thirteen years station agent and telegraph operator at Weldon, was very unceremoniously dismissed last Wednesday morning. The first intimation he had that he was superceded was when the new agent came in and took possession of the depot. The change was a surprise to the people of Weldon and has created considerable indignation, for never was there a more obliging railroad man to do business with than our old friend "Chenny."

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 11, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

In the STOCK JOURNAL we find that following item: Jacob ZIEGLER, a prominent stockman and feeder of Clinton, Ill., was here Wednesday with two loads of cattle, one of which averaged 1555 pounds and sold to Myers & Regenstein for New York fine trade, at $6.00. The other load sold at $5.00. He also had a 1860 pound bull sold at $4.00.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 18, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

LOCAL MATTERS.

Mr. and Mrs. Milt. COLWELL entertained a number of Clinton friends last Wednesday evening. Mr. Colwell has one of the finest farm houses in the county.

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Lewis GASH cut Dick RUE, a colored boy, in the face with a knife last Tuesday, making quite a serious wound. Both boys got into a fight after coming out of school.

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The poultry market around Clinton has been lively during the past two weeks. This week J. B. WORMLEY shipped twelve tons from this city to New York by the Pacific express.

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Thirty years ago Mr. E. T. JEFFREY entered the service of the Illinois Central company as an office boy. Today he is the general manager of all the lines of road belonging to that company.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 18, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Arthur BROWN was cited to appear before Justice McHENRY to answer to the paternity of a child that Printha DANIEL expected to become the mother of. Brown concluded it would be cheaper to marry the girl than go to jail in default of the $500 which the law would require him to put up for the maintenance of the child. Justice McHenry tied the knot, and then Arthur and his bride walked out of court without even saying thank you to the Justice. No money.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 18, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Colonel SNELL has concluded not to pay out any more fees to lawyers. He had a suit the other day before Justice McHENRY and won the case. It is said the jury gave a verdict in his favor in order to stop him from speaking any longer.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 18, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

There is blood on that part of the moon that casts its refulgent rays over the homes that shelter Jim MORROW and Harry SUMMERS. The two men are brothers-in-law, but unfortunately there is a feud existing between them that makes the lives of both anything but pleasant. As the result of a lawsuit, tried some time ago, when Jim and Harry meet there is profanity in the atmosphere. They met in this city yesterday, and as they passed each other Jim made a remark that grated on Harry's ear, and as a result Harry presented himself at Justice McHENRY's law shop and swore out a warrant for his brother-in-law. The case was tried and Jim owned up that he did say the objectionable words, so Justice McHenry assessed $9.75 as fine and costs. Jim paid the money and left.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 25, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A CHANGE IN THE SUPERINTENDENCY OF THE POOR FARM.

A year ago, when the board of supervisors removed Henry C. HENSON from the superintendency of the poor farm, because there were others who would take the place for a lower price than he was getting, THE PUBLIC thought it was a short-sighted policy on the part of the board. Mr. Henson had filled the place for two years with credit to himself and with profit to the county. This changing of the superintendency every year or two is all wrong. When a good man is found he should be kept there so long as he attends to his duty faithfully. A matter of $100 or $200 on a salary is a small consideration. No member of the board would transact his own private business on that principle. This week the board removed another good man simply because he asked the same salary which was given to him one year ago. Mr. Frank MOORE has been the superintendent during the past year, and the committee of the board on the poor farm accord to him the credit of being a prudent, careful man, and one who has worked for the best interests of the county. There has been no complaint from any quarter as to Mr. Moore's management, and the change was only made because Mr. Moore thought the services of himself and wife were worth $800 for the year. There were six or seven applicants for the office. Mr. Henson stood next to Mr. Moore in the estimation of the board, and as his bid was the lowest, he got the place. The farm will still be in good hands, but with the policy adopted by the board, Mr. Henson is only sure of the year for which he is elected. There is no incentive for a man to carefully guard the interests of the county. The plan of giving the superintendency to the lowest bidder should be abandoned. The board ought to fix the salary the same as they do for other county officers, and then elect the best man for the place.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 25, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WON'T GRANT THE REQUEST.

In order to have a cemetery that would be a credit to Clinton, the city some years ago bought Woodlawn Cemetery from Mr. GIDEON, and then added forty acres to it. It is conceded to be one of the handsomest cemeteries in Central Illinois, and the city has spent considerable money in beautifying it. While it was bought for the use of the people of the city yet the city council have acted in a liberal spirit and permitted people in any part of the county to purchase lots in it for the burial of their dead. The city paid a large price for the land, and whatever revenue there is from the sale of lots is expended in beautifying the grounds and keeping a superintendent on duty all the time to take care of the property. The city makes nothing out of it, and naturally the council wants to keep the expenses as low as possible. Last Tuesday a committee of the council went before the board of supervisors and asked the board for permission to have the plat of the cemetery recorded in the county records without having to pay the regular fees. The city offered to pay all of the expense of making the plat and having it entered on the books without any cost to the county. This would save the city $50 or $75. The board refused permission, and demand to the utmost farthing the fees for recording. Every cemetery association in the county ought to be granted the privilege of recording their plats without being compelled to pay the charges exacted of an individual for recording the deeds of his property, for the cemeteries are not a source of profit. We think the board will reconsider its action in this matter, for we do not believe there is a supervisor in the county who would exact the pound of flesh under the circumstances if they had thoroughly understood the request made by the committee of the city council.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 25, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

It is an encouraging sign to see a decided stand taken by the business men upon the vitally important question of the purity of food-stuffs. In the present day more particularly, people demand some guarantee of the purity of what they buy. Mere assertions will not do. "Faultless Tea," now being imported by Mr. Drew INMAN, has this guarantee, and this guarantee consists in the fact that it is only procurable in the Perfection tea can. This package is a guarantee that all teas packed within it are pure, of good grades and cured in a uniform manner by the Perfection process.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 25, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

S. K. CARTER, county treasurer, filed a new bond this week for $200,000, with Dr. J. WARNER, C. H. MOORE, Col. T. SNELL, J. J. McGRAW, and Wm. METZGAR as sureties.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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December 25, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A LITTLE GIRL KILLED BY TAKING STRYCHNINE PILLS.

Out at Lane Station a school teacher named WRIGHT boards with the family of Mr. HORNEY. He has been under medical treatment for some time, and his condition required the most powerful medicines. His physician gave him a box of strychnine pills and told him to be careful about taking them. Wright left the box of pills on a table in his room and the little grand-daughter of Mrs. Horney, who was visiting there with her mother, got hold of the box on Monday and took a number of the pills, which caused her death within an hour after taking them. The child was less than two years old. Her parents live in Argenta, Piatt county.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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