NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS - 1883

January 5, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS

Fred. KENT returned to Jacksonville to school this week.

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There are now twenty-nine paupers at the DeWitt county poor farm.

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Mrs. N. E. WHEELER has been seriously ill during the past two weeks.

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Link. HULL, of Havana, was in Clinton during the holidays visiting relatives.

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Mrs. COLLYER presented her husband with a fine boy baby for a Christmas gift.

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Miss Florence PHARES, of Weldon, spent New Year's Day with relatives in Clinton.

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Capt. H. H. MERRIMAN spent the holidays in Cisco and Peoria with his daughters.

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The public sale of W. B. BARNETT will occur on the 20th inst. A. C. ARNOLD is the auctioneer.

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Wm. HALL, of Amboy, ushered in the new year with old friends and acquaintances in Clinton.

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Wm. MOORE returned home from Kansas last Tuesday where he has been during the past five weeks.

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F. M. BURROUGHS went to Champaign last week and disposed of a portion of his real estate near that city.

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J. B. ZIGLER, of Ohio, on his way to Santa Fe, New Mexico, spent a few days last week with Dr. J. A. GRIFFITH.

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Captain TURNER has sold his two-hundred acre farm near Kenney to Mr. RYBOLT, for $8500. Judge INGHAM negotiated the sale for the Captain.

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Tam HAND, who is engaged in the employ of Maxwell & Co., of Chicago, has been visiting parents and friends in Clinton during the past week.

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J. Q. ADAMS, who went from Clinton to Colorado Springs several years ago, has moved to Los Angeles, California. "Tin" was quite prosperous in Colorado and made some money.

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Mr. Henry CRANG advertises his entire stock of winter goods in today's PUBLIC, at cost, for the next three weeks.

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Beverly WAGGONER has been waiting upon the smiles of some of the angelic gender in Vandalia during the past two weeks. Beverly is an artist in the profession.

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J. FREUDENSTEIN, J. H. WAGGONER, A. D. McHENRY, E. SYLVESTER and Walter MATHIS attended a meeting of the Masonic lodge in Farmer City on last Friday evening.

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Mr. George CHENOWETH, of Cisco, Mr. James JOLLY, of Delevan, and Mr. and Mrs. C. L. PHARES, of Maroa, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. G. M. AUGHINBAUGH during the holidays.

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At the DeWitt county poor farm there is a fourteen-year-old boy whom nature has supplied with double joints. When he stands up his ankles turn under. He can neither talk nor walk.

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S. D. MITCHELL will offer at public sale a portion of his personal goods, on the 13th inst., at the farm of Andrew WILSON, in Wilson township. The sale will be conducted by A. C. ARNOLD.

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John COSTLEY, son of W. H. COSTLEY, of Weldon, fell from a hay mow the other day and fractured his right shoulder by falling on the edge of the manger. He will be laid up for this winter at least.

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It is the custom to toll the bell on the school house at the funeral of any one of the graduates of the high school. Today, while the funeral procession escorting the remains of the late Augustus P. SWEENEY was passing through town to the cemetery, the bell was tolled.

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Mr. George HARTSOCK has made a large fish pond on his farm in Texas township, near his dwelling-house, and it will be stocked with fish by the state commission. This improvement was not costly, but it will add beauty to the surroundings of the farm. (See related article)

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Some ten or twelve couples of Clinton's youth and beauty met in the MAGILL House parlors, on New Year's night, and celebrated the advent of 1883 with music and dancing. RICHEY's parlor orchestra furnished the music, and the supper was prepared by the Magill House.

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Lee DEMOREST can not keep out of trouble. A few days ago he came to Clinton and stole four or five billiard balls from Abe RAZEY's billiard room. For this he was arrested, and the probabilities are that he will board with Sheriff GARDINER till the March term of the circuit court.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 5, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Bruce SCOTT and Jerome TRIBBETT are partners in the broker business, but instead of betting on options in corn, etc., as they do on the board of trade, Bruce and his pal have their customers bet on the lucky turn of the card. Wm. S. SUMMERS, a sharper from Champaign, came over to Clinton the other day to make a stake, but his "hand" didn't hold out and Bruce got the "pot." Summers tried it again and again, and after depositing all of his wealth he put up a silver watch for $18. The watch passed into Bruce's possession, and then Summers swore in his wrath that he would have revenge. So he hiked himself to Justice McHENRY's office and there made complaint that Scott and Tribbett were wicked young men and he appealed to justice to get him back his watch and his wealth. Scott and Tribbett were cited to appear before his Honor, Justice McHenry, forthwith, but as they were not ready for trial they got a continuance till the 12th. The watch must be a good one, for Bruce afterward sold it for $15.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 5, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

With the ringing out of the old year and the ushering in of the new, Abe RAZEY stepped down and out as landlord of the MAGILL House and Mr. J. MARIS assumed control of affairs. To celebrate the event Mr. Maris invited a number of our prominent citizens to dine with him on New Year's Day, and for the occasion a splendid bill of fare was prepared. Everything that could be had in the way of luxuries was set before the guests, and it would be needless to add that ample justice was done to the dinner. Mr. Maris evidently understands how to cater for his guests, and if last Monday's dinner is a sample of what he is capable of we can certainly hope that that the fame of the Magill House will spread far and wide and that the house will be constantly filled with guests. As THE PUBLIC said last week, Mr. Maris is an old commercial traveler, and during the past fifteen years he has had ample opportunity of studying hotel life. This experience is alone better than gold as a capital for the landlord of a hotel. Clinton will hope for a prosperous career for the new landlord of the Magill House.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 5, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE SHOT GUN ARGUMENT DIDN'T PREVAIL.

James THOMPSON lives in a fine house about half a mile from the village of Waynesville. He is the owner, in his wife's name, of 285 acres of rich land, worth $65 an acre, and has cattle, horses and other personal property that will figure away up in the thousands, yet he refuses to pay his debts. A firm over in Virginia, Cass county, has a claim against him of nearly $800, for which they obtained judgment. Two executions were issued, which were returned by the sheriff endorsed, "No property found." R. A. LEMON, the firm's attorney, thought it strange that a rich man like Thompson had not property enough out of which to make $800, so he had a writ issued by the county judge for Mr. Thompson's body to satisfy the judgment. Sheriff GARDINER sent his deputy, Billy MILLS, over to Waynesville on Tuesday to execute the writ, and when Billy made known his errand to Thompson that irate gentleman brought out his shot-gun and told the deputy he could not take him. Billy telegraphed the condition of affairs to the sheriff, and he at once returned an order for Mills to summon a sufficient posse, if it took the whole township, to secure the arrest of Thompson. Armed with these instructions, and with a sufficient force of men, Billy invaded the Thompson fortress on Wednesday morning, when the belligerent capitulated and laid down his arms. Thompson was brought to Clinton and lodged in jail, and in a little while afterward he was released on $1200 bail for his appearance on the 12th inst. before the county judge. By that time he will either have to prove that he owns nothing or pay the debt. Immediately after his release, Sheriff Gardiner arrested him on the charge of resisting an officer, for which he will have a hearing at the next term of the circuit court. Thompson will find it a dear piece of business to buck against the law with a shot-gun.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 5, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FIRE IN McABOY'S GREEN HOUSE.

At two o'clock last Saturday morning Mrs. W. W. McABOY was awakened from a sense of suffocation, and she awakened her husband. The bedroom was full of smoke, and when Mr. McABOY opened the door leading to the office of his green-house he was driven back by the smoke and flames. Mr. McAboy got out in the street and gave the alarm of fire, and then went back and tried to quench the flames. It seemed an age to Mr. McAboy before help came to him, but during the interval he did effective work in fighting the fire. After hard work the flames were subdued, but the wreck of flowers and glass in the green-house was great. One of the green-houses was nearly destroyed and the others were badly damaged. Mr. McAboy estimates his loss at between $400 and $500, and on flowers and seeds about $300. A kind friend went among the business men on Saturday and raised about $100 to help Mr. McAboy repair his losses. The fire caught in a barrel of soot that was in the cellar under the office. It is supposed to be a case of spontaneous combustion.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 5, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS.—At the last convention of Plantagenet lodge, K. of P., the following officers were installed for the ensuing term:

P. C.—Drew INMAN.
C. C.—Lyman H. HENRY
V. C.—A. H. MAGILL
Prelate—C. L. ROBBINS
M. E.—William METZGER
M. F.—Samuel MONLUX
K. R. S.—John G. DAVIS
M. A.—Peter SPRAGUE
I. G.—Albert RUNDLE
O. G.—C. B. BARNETT

Trustees—William METZGER, Frank M. BURROUGHS and Drew INMAN.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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January 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. James BRELSFORD, of Kenney, acted foolishly the other day. A week or two ago he was arrested on a writ of ne exeat and brought to Clinton. Brelsford paid the debt and was released. Mr. R. T. SPENCER, editor of the Kenney Gazette, merely reported the case in his next issue, which gave offense to Brelsford, and meeting Spencer on the street Brelsford thumped him rather roughly. Spencer came out of the fight with a black eye. Ald. FERGUSON abetted Brelsford and would not allow anyone to come to the help of poor Spencer. Brelsford is a powerfully built man, while Spencer has more brain than muscle and could not cope with his burly antagonist. Brelsford was arrested and Justice GRAHAM fined him for the assault. On Wednesday Spencer came to Clinton and had Brelsford re-arrested. He plead guilty yesterday, and today the court will hear evidence to determine the amount of the fine. Spencer has also commenced suit in the circuit court for damages of $1000.

(See related article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 9, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Miss Hulda JOHNSON will visit in Indianapolis, Ind., next week.

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Mrs. WILLIVER, of Bloomington, is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Wesley KELLY, in this city.

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The Rev. T. I. COULTAS will deliver a temperance lecture in the M. E. Church next Monday night.

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E. S. VANMETER rejoices in being the father of a boy baby, kicking the scales at near 12 pounds.

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Dick ROBBINS has now got down to business at J. F. MILLER's, where he would be pleased to see all his old friends.

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Jaques BRYANT was the recipient of a birthday surprise last Monday night at the hands of his wife and a number of his friends. A pleasant time was enjoyed.

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Mr. O. E. HARRIS will go to Monticello next Monday as attorney in a liquor case, in which Mr. G. W. CORDER, of DeLand, is defendant.

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Sherman LISENBY has secured a lucrative position as line repairer for the Western Union Telegraph Company, at the head of a gang of men.

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All persons who have not paid their taxes in Clintonia Township for the year 1882 are requested to call on J. W. BOWREN, tax collector, and settle up.

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Mrs. Cora FOSTER, of North Lewisburg, Ohio, who has been visiting relatives in Clinton for some time, will leave Monday for a visit in Detroit, Michigan.

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On Saturday, March 3d, at ten o'clock a.m., Mrs. F. S. McCUDDY will sell at the farm of the late F. S. McCUDDY, two finely matched brood mares, two good milk cows, twenty-four hogs and farming implements. A. C. ARNOLD, auctioneer.

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In another column of THE PUBLIC will be found the advertisement of J. J. ROBINSON, house and sign painter. Mr. Robinson also makes a specialty of upholstering and furniture repairing. He can be found in the room over CRANG's dry goods store.

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Those people in Clinton who shivered at the thought of the thermometer standing at 20 degrees below zero, during the late weather carnival, would probably have continued to shake for some time to come had they been up in Iowa where the thermometer stood at 40 below.

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Kenney will enjoy the luxury of a grand ball on the night of St. Valentine's Day. On this occasion the citizens of Kenney will don their Sunday attire and trot out the old Saint in glittering paraphernalia. It will be a high time for Kenney and a big time for all who attend.

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Everybody desires to engage in the music business on the other shore, but they also desire to choose their own mode of transportation. Bob EDMISTON came near ascending to glory on the tricky end of a mule, last week, but escaped by the skin of his nose. Bob says he is not ready for a harp yet.

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All of the MAGILL family connection living in Manchester, Iowa, got here on Wednesday evening to attend the funeral of the late Henry MAGILL. To get word to them a messenger had to go to Bloomington on Monday afternoon to telegraph the relatives, as Clinton was cut off from all telegraphic connection by the storm.

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James LANE, a pedagogue who wielded the birch at the Hawkyard school house, near Kenney, the early part of the winter, it will be remembered, absconded with a considerable amount of school money and property. He was recently caught in Missouri and is now lodged in the Decatur jail awaiting his trial.

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Mr. David BELL, of Creek township, is preparing to quit the active business of life, and on Monday, February 22d, at ten o'clock, he will offer at public sale, at his residence three miles southwest of Lane, a lot of stock, consisting of mules, horses, colts, cows, heifers, steers, fat hogs, brood sows, shoats, and a complete assortment of farming implements. Mr. Bell proposes to spend his remaining days in quietude on his farm.

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The revival meetings are still in progress in the M. E. Church, and the pastor feels strong in the hope that some lasting good will be accomplished. The weather has been a great drawback, but with a change there is hope that larger congregations will attend the evening meetings. Mr. COULTAS is an energetic worker and full of zeal for his holy calling, and if Clinton is not benefited it will not be for want of effort on his part.

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Had it not been for the Springfield pision of the Central road, Clinton would have been completely shut in from the outer world from last Saturday morning till Monday night. The trains on the Central were blockaded by the ice in the tracks and not a wheel could turn north or south of here. On the Wabash, Jack CALDWELL's train went into the ditch near Sugar Creek and there it remained till Tuesday night. The telegraph and telephone wires were down in every direction, and not a word could Clinton hear from the outside world. But by Wednesday all the trains began to run, but some of them are very irregular in their time.

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Rev. J. L. B. ELLIS, the commander of the Methodist forces in Waynesville, put his temper and soul in great jeopardy last Sunday by walking over the sleet and ice from that place to Kenney, a distance of about fifteen miles, with the vain hope of robbing Hades of some of its choice fuel. Revival meetings have been conducted in Kenney during the past few weeks, and so far they have only succeeded in getting up a program for such ungodly festivities as a ball to be given on next Wednesday night in honor of St. Valentine. The reverend gentleman is doubtless a zealous worker in the vineyard, and may have unquestioned confidence in Christian faith as a great motive power, but he will yet be compelled to admit that there is a vast difference between moving a mountain and the heart of a Tunbridge Democrat.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 9, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

News reached here this week that Fenton H. BOGAR, formerly a prominent business man in this city, had become insane at his home in Gainsville, Florida, but nothing confirming the rumor has reached us. This morning it was stated on the streets that Mr. Bogar had since died.

(See related article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 9, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A Moultrie county lady named WAGGONER, married less than a year ago, Friday night of last week gave birth to three children—two boys and a girl—the three weighing 21 pounds. The mother and children all died and were buried on Sunday in the same coffin. Mrs. Waggoner was twenty-seven years old.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 16, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

D. M. WALLER, who went from Texas township to Kansas a few months ago, has had his barn burned, in which was four hundred bushels of wheat. This is a heavy loss for a man just beginning in a new country.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 23, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Maroa News says that Mrs. N. H. WALLER had a spider taken out of her ear the other day which crawled in while she was asleep.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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February 23, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

John JANUARY, the footless soldier, gave his "Camp Talk" in DeWitt Hall, last night, to a fair audience. Mr. January spoke for more than two hours, and yet his hearers kept urging him on. The proceeds of the [event] will be used by Frank Lowry Post in aiding soldiers and their families who are in distress.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 2, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Late reports confirm the first statement made in THE PUBLIC that Fenton H. BOGAR, of Cedar Keys, Florida, had become insane. He became so bad that his family was finally compelled to have him sent to an asylum. His many friends in this county will feel sad over this news, as Mr. Bogar was universally respected while in business in this city.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 9, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. George HARTSOCK has now one hundred German carp planted in the fish pond on his farm, he having received the fish from the state commissioners. His pond is about two rods wide and five rods long and cost only $41 for the work.

(See related article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 9, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A BAD FALL.—Mr. George W. GIDEON was coming from the north part of town on Tuesday, carrying a bucket of milk and a basket of parsnips. When he got in front of Mr. BURROUGH's residence, on Center street, two boys passed him on the sidewalk, going in the opposite direction. There was a loose plank in the walk. One of the boys stepped on one end of it and tipped up the other end in front of Mr. Gideon. The old gentleman did not notice it and he tripped against it and fell with violent force to the walk. Having both his hands full with his milk bucket and basket, he was not able to even break the force of the fall with his hands. His face was badly bruised, both eyes were discolored, and a nail that was sticking up in the walk penetrated his nose at the bridge and tore the flesh open. Besides this his forehead and the left temple were bruised. The old gentleman bled for nearly twenty-four hours before the flow could be stopped. And at his age a fall will naturally be felt for some time. Mr. Gideon intends to ask the city council to recompense him for the injuries received. He does not propose to be unreasonable in his demands if the city will only act fairly by him.

(See related article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 16, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The fellows who beat their wives have a prospect for a dose of rawhide to cure them of their brutality, as Quinn's bill has passed the house and will no doubt be endorsed by the senate. The law provides that any man who shall be found guilty of an assault or an assault and battery on his wife, shall be sentenced to receive not less than five nor more than twenty-five lashes on the bare back with a common rawhide whip, and pay all costs of prosecution. One dose is warranted to cure the worst case of wife-whipping.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 16, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The great complaint of the Democratic party is that the Republican party is constantly fighting over the battles of the war and shaking the bloody shirt in their faces. To some of them any mention of the war is like shaking a red flag at a bull. At the present session of the legislature an effort has been made to secure an appropriation for the preservation of the regimental colors that are now in charge of the state. The old shot-riddled flags are worn and tattered, and even with the greatest of care they are dropping to pieces. The object of the appropriation is to build a lot of glass cases in the state-house where the flags can be kept secure from the action of the air and dampness. The only hostility to the appropriation has come from the leaders of the Democratic party in the house. The Republicans have but a majority of one in the house when all their members are present, and thus far in the session several have not been in attendance at Springfield because of sickness and other causes. Petitions are now being sent in by the Grand Army Posts from all parts of the state asking the legislature to make the appropriation. In these Posts are both Democrats and Republicans, but all were soldiers, and they feel an interest in the preservation of the flags under which they rallied on the field of battle. At the meeting of Frank Lowry Post in this city, on last Saturday night, a petition with over forty names was prepared and forwarded to Dr. Calhoun at Springfield.

Note: These flags, previously located at The Hall of Flags in the Centennial Building at Springfield, can now be seen at The Illinois State Military Museum at Springfield’s Camp Lincoln. Online, you may view the flags at Civil War Flags of Illinois (http://www.civil-war.com/ ).—SB

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 23, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Philip SLOAT has four volumes of a book entitled "The Historical, Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the United States," printed in 1796. The work has been in the Sloat family for more than eighty years and is prized by the owner because of its ancient date.

(Note: This book was recenty found being sold by an antique book dealer for $1,750.00)—SB

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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March 23, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. G. W. GIDEON, who was injured a couple of weeks ago by falling on the sidewalk in front of Mr. BURROUGH's house, caused by a loose plank in the sidewalk, made a statement of his case to the council at the meeting held March 13. The matter was referred to a committee. At the last meeting the council decided not to pay Mr. Gideon for the injuries received, as it would be establishing a precedent in such cases. The probabilities are that Mr. Gideon will appeal to the courts.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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April 13, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Thirty years ago William MOLSON, who was born and reared on Long Point, in Wapella township, left this county to seek wealth in the gold mines of California. Like thousands who were among the early gold seekers he had his good and bad streaks of fortune, but through all he has managed to save something for the proverbial "rainy day." A couple of weeks ago he came from California to Colorado on a speculating tour, and while in Denver he heard a man at the hotel talking of Bloomington. This turned Mr. Molson's thoughts back to the home of his youth, and that night he determined to make a pilgrimage back to DeWitt county. Early next morning he started for Illinois and came to Clinton to find his mother. During his absence he had lost all trace of his relatives, and when he arrived here he learned that his mother was now the wife of Mr. Joseph ARMSTRONG. When mother and son met neither could recognize the other at first. It was a joyful meeting. Mr. Molson will remain here a while longer and then return to his home in California.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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April 27, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Milton R. COLWELL was out at work last Monday, during the storm, taking care of his sheep. In the evening he had a severe chill, and on Tuesday morning his condition was so much worse that Dr. WRIGHT was summoned. The exposure has resulted in pneumonia, and Mr. Colwell now is in a very critical condition.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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April 27, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Jimmy JACKSON, Mr. J. A. JACKSON's eleven-year-old boy, had a serious time for a few days. Last Friday evening he and a companion were tossing a ball near the corner of Monroe and Washington streets. His companion threw the ball with more force than usual, and as Jimmy was running backward to catch it Tom HENSON was coming around the corner with his team and wagon. Tom was watching the ball and trying to dodge it, and did not see Jimmy till the little fellow struck the back of his head against the wagon tire and fell. Jimmy was carried into his father's house and physicians were sent for. On examination it was found that the back of Jimmy's skull was fractured. For about two days it was feared that the accident would end fatally, but Jimmy recovered and is again on the street.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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April 27, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Charles BRYANT went to Hot Springs three weeks ago in the hope that the healing waters would relieve him of his bodily ailments. He took seven baths, but found that he was getting worse instead of better. By the advice of his physician he returned home, arriving in Clinton last evening.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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April 27, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Elm Grove.

One week ago last evening a large number of young folks gathered at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. SWAN. The occasion for the gathering was to celebrate the birthday of Miss Anna. The meeting was a happy one. The guests were the recipients of a bountiful supper, which was the greatest enjoyment of the evening. After supper the time was spent in singing and plays, all doing their part, in order that the event might be an enjoyable one and not soon to be forgotten. At four o'clock in the morning all departed for their homes, carrying with them the consciousness that the night was well spent, and that they had nothing in the least to regret.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 4, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. John F. McGEE, for the past two years or more a student in Moore and Warner's law office in this city started for Fargo, Dakota, on last Monday evening, where he will engage in the practice of his profession. A few months ago Mr. McGee was admitted to the bar, when he passed a first-class examination. He was fortunate in having as his preceptors men of so high standing in the profession as Messrs. Moore & Warner, and the time he spent in their office will tell upon his future business life. Mr. McGee is a young man of more than average ability, and in the new country to which he has gone he will make his mark.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 11, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Miss Clara LAFFERTY, aged twenty-three years, was adjudged insane yesterday and sent to the asylum at Jacksonville. Her mental trouble arises from nervousness. She has been in bad health for nearly three years, but has only exhibited signs of insanity during the past three or four months.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 18, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A turtle got into Mr. George HARTSOCK's fish pond this week and demolished about seventy of the young fish that were recently planted. The turtle measured about eighteen inches across the back. Mr. Hartsock has placed wire netting around the pond to keep any more turtles from getting in.

(See 1887 article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 18, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Henry BOGARDUS yesterday showed THE PUBLIC the plans of Mr. A. R. Phares' new residence, which he is going to build on the lot where his present residence is. It is to be a two-story building, large and roomy, with an imposing front and everything to correspond. The contract price for the building is $4000. Mr. Bogardus is also at work on Mr. M. R. COLWELL's new farm residence. Milt is investing $3000 in his new home, and he will have one of the nicest farm houses in the county.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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May 25, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. French DeLAND arrived at home last Saturday, making but a short wedding tour. French concluded that it was more sensible to get back home and settle down to business then to be wasting time in sight-seeing.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 8, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Came West to Grow Up With the Country.

Twenty-three years ago William E. KIRKER came from Ohio and located in Clinton. He was poor in purse, having only six dollars in cash when he landed here, but he was full of energy and a determination to make his way in the world. He entered the service of Kent & Steere, dealers in grain and lumber, and at first worked for that firm for barely sufficient to keep body and soul together. There was no work too hard for him, and he shoveled grain, handled lumber, and turned his hand to whatever his employers required him to do. By and by his service became more valuable; his employers found that he was a man to be trusted and that he never shirked any duty. Mr. Kirker's uncle afterward bought out Mr. Steere's interest in the business, and by this change in the firm Mr. W. E. Kirker was advanced to a more responsible position. Being economical in his habits Mr. Kirker was able to save from his meager salary enough to buy his uncle's interest in the business when the old gentleman wanted to retire, and then the firm was composed of Mr. Emmett KENT and Mr. W. E. Kirker. This firm continued till about a year ago when Mr. Kirker retired. Both members of the firm made money. They were fortunately well mated in business, and both worked industriously for success. When Mr. Kirker dissolved partnership with Mr. Kent he expected to do business at a few stations in buying grain, but as this took him from home more than was congenial to him he abandoned it after a few months' trial. During the many years he was in partnership with Mr. Kent, Mr. Kirker had accumulated enough to provide him with a reasonable competence for the remainder of his days, but being accustomed to an active life, one of leisure was not to his taste.

Last January he went to Nebraska on a prospecting tour, and while there he saw a good opportunity to invest about $12,000 in corn. This he did, and on his investment he will realize a handsome profit. While out there he took a fancy to Lincoln, Neb., and as he had no business ties here he concluded to locate there. Yesterday Mr. Kirker and his family bade farewell to Clinton and left for their new home in Lincoln. Mr. and Mrs. Kirker will be missed in the social circle. They enjoyed the company of their friends, and their hospitable home was an inviting place for an evening's pleasure. Mr. Kirker took an active interest in the advancement of Clinton, and has for more than one term served the people in a public capacity. For the past three years and more he has been a member of the board of education, in which office he gave his time and business ability unstintedly to a judicious management of the important interests of education. Good-bye, Bro. Kirker. Clinton can illy afford to lose such a family.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 8, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

He Wanted to Be an Agent.

Andrew SCOTT is a tiller of the soil in Wapella township, and for nearly sixty years he has led a bucolic life. The old man probably wearied of the slow life of a farmer and wanted to achieve wealth and fame in other directions. A few days ago an agent for a combined corn sheller and grinder called upon Mr. Scott and got him interested in the beauties of his machine, and finally the old man came to the conclusion that here was the opportunity for sudden wealth for which his soul had been so long craving. These agents of patent rights have a gift of persuasion that is hard to overcome, and before this one left he succeeded in getting Mr. Scott's consent to take the agency of the combined sheller and grinder. It was necessary to have Mr. Scott's name signed to a paper accepting the agency. The agent left and the old man was anxiously awaiting the arrival of the first invoice of machines so that he could begin work. Probably he dreamed of a palace by some beautiful lake, out of the profits, where he could spend the remaining days of his life sailing on the blue waters and fishing for black bass. But his dream of wealth was ruthlessly vanished. The signature to what he supposed was his commission as agent for the celebrated combined sheller and grinder turns out to be a promissory note for $150. The sharp agent went to Lincoln to dispose of the note, from which city the first intimation came to Mr. Scott that he had been swindled. It is useless to point a moral in this case, for farmers will continue to be the victims of such sharpers. Better stick to the farm and leave agencies and patent right agents alone.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 15, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Two of the CLIFTON children were taken to Kansas this week by their grandfather, W. J. CLIFTON, and the baby , who was in its mother's arms when she was killed by the cyclone, was taken to Texas by Mr. MONEY, Mrs. CLIFTON's father. Mr. Edwin WELD was appointed guardian of the children.

(See CYCLONE)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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June 15, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. E. O. SMITH, the man who built the court-house in this city, was here this week on business. He is now a resident of California, and is reputed to be very wealthy. The contract price for building the court-house was $3000, and we are satisfied that he did not get his start on the road to fortune from building it. At that time the court-house was considered a model of architecture, but the fashions have changed since then. While Mr. Smith was building it the people of this senatorial district, which comprised McLean, DeWitt and Macon counties elected him to the state senate, defeating Dr. Rogers, of Bloomington. The district was largely Democratic in those days, but the people did not take kindly to Dr. Rogers. Mr. Smith was an old line Whig.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 13, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. James KEGARICE came home from Missouri the other day to visit his family and recruit his failing health. For several years he has been operating in Missouri for an insurance company, in which business he is successful. During the war Mr. Kegarice injured himself while building rifle pits, and since then he has been suffering from severe pains in the chest. As the result of this injury Mr. Kegarice was discharged from the service. He was a member of the Forty-first Regiment, and served under Captain J. F. Harrold. The injury received more than twenty years ago has developed into a large tumor on Mr. Kegarice's abdomen. He has consulted with celebrated physicians in St. Louis, but they hold out no hopes of relief. A surgical operation would result in immediate death. A year or more ago he weighted over two hundred pounds. His disease has reduced him in flesh more than fifty pounds. The poor fellow bravely stares fate in the face. Every day increases his suffering.

(See obituary)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 13, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Bill HOUSTON was in town yesterday looking after his extensive business interests. Bill is a crank on the subject of wealth, and this is what unsettled his mind and caused him to be sent to the poor farm as he could not be admitted to the insane asylum. He imagines that he is the owner of a large estate in this county and that he is being defrauded out of his rights by a firm in this city. Before Bill was sent to the poor farm he called upon a lawyer in this city and wanted to begin suit at once for the recovery of $75,000, and because the lawyer would not humor him in his whim Bill made a dash at him and would have injured him had he not succeeded in getting out of the office and out into the street. Just before his confinement in jail, where he was kept for several months, Bill laid in wait for a young man whom he claimed was trying to steal the affections of a young lady who Bill claimed was going to marry him. Bill was armed with a murderous-looking knife and if the young man had been unfortunate enough to have met him, Bill would certainly have killed him. Then it was considered that Bill was a dangerous character to be allowed to run at large. He has been at the poor farm for some months, and has given but little trouble. Of late he became restless and wanted to come to Clinton to look after his property, so to humor him Henry HENSON allowed [him] to come up from Hallsville yesterday. Bill declares that he will not go back again, but Henry will see to that part of it.

(See related article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 27, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Alex FORBES was arrested in DeWitt on last Saturday by the city marshal of Bloomington on the charge of having stole $37 from a farmer named Durgy, for whom Forbes worked. Forbes denies the theft and there is no evidence that he took the money except that he and the pocket-book were missing about the same time.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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July 27, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

IN DEEP WATER.

Wesley CLEARWATER, the original owner of the Farmer City Reaper, got himself into the deep waters of trouble about three years ago, from which he seemed to be unable to extricate himself. One evening Clearwater was in the express office at Farmer City while Major HOLLOWAY was making up his packages for the train. One money package contained $290, and while the Major was temporarily absent in another part of the building in which the express company had its office, Clearwater picked up the package and skipped out. The Major returned in a few minutes and discovered the loss. As Clearwater had left the office, suspicion at once rested upon him. The Major and one or two others went up to the depot and there they found Clearwater waiting for the train. The Major accused Clearwater of stealing the package, which he stoutly denied, but upon being closely cornered he admitted the theft. He had only $20 of the money in his pocket, and this he gave to the Major, and at the same time Clearwater said that if they would go with him he would show them where he had hidden the balance of the money if the company would not prosecute him. This was agreed to on condition that Clearwater would clear out and never come back to Farmer City. The money was recovered and Clearwater left the State. At the next term of the circuit court of this county an indictment was found against Clearwater, and this has been hanging over him ever since.

About six months ago he came back from the West and settled in Bloomington, where he worked occasionally in the printing offices. His wife had also opened out a laundry to help eke out a living for the family. So long as he remained out of reach no effort was made to interfere with him, but when he foolishly came back and settled within twenty-five miles of the scene of the crime, the officers were compelled to enforce the law. On last Friday Sheriff GARDINER went to Bloomington and with the assistance of the sheriff of McLean county he arrested Clearwater and brought him to Clinton. Clearwater told Sheriff Gardiner that many a time since the robbery he has been on the point of returning and giving himself up. The crime was worse than a nightmare to him, and he could not rest contented for a single hour anywhere. Clearwater did not see his wife before he left Bloomington. He told Sheriff Gardiner that his family had not more than seventy-five cents in the house, and he did not know what they would do now. The sheriff gave him five dollars, and this Clearwater enclosed in a note and sent to his wife, and also told her of his arrest. Unless Clearwater can furnish $500 bail, he will have to remain in jail till the circuit court meets next month. He has a wife and three children in Bloomington. Since he stole the money he has been trying to atone for the past by leading an industrious life. His father is one of the oldest citizens of this county, having lived near Farmer City for more than forty years. Wesley it seems is the black sheep of the flock, for the Clearwater family stand high in the estimation of those who have known them since they settled in this county.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 3, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Wesley CLEARWATER, an account of whose crime was treated in detail in last week's PUBLIC, has been released from jail under $500 bail. His father and brother and some parties in Farmer City are his securities.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 10, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On last Tuesday evening [April 7th] nearly sixty Masons boarded a special train and went to Maroa on a visit to Maroa lodge No. 454, A. F. and A. M., the occasion being the conferring the Master Mason's degree upon Rev. Bro. W. A. REYNOLDS. Over one hundred Masons were present, and among the past masters were Worshipful Bros. J. H. CROCKER and Joseph JONES, of Maroa lodge, No. 454; and C. GOODBRAKE, A. H. C. BARBER, Jos. FREUDENSTEIN, E. SYLVESTER and L. S. McGRAW, of DeWitt, No. 84. Bro. W. M. PHARES, the W. M. of Maroa lodge, requested Worshipful Bro. W. A. J. DeLANCY, of Bloomington, to preside and the officers of DeWitt lodge, No. 84, to assist him in the work, which was accordingly done. On the dais were Worshipful Bros. A. V. LISENBY and Wm. M. PHARES, the masters; also Worshipful Bros. Goodbrake and Crocker, the oldest past masters of the Clinton and Maroa lodges. Notwithstanding the lodge room was crowded, the work of the evening reflected credit upon the brothers engaged, and all present were deeply impressed with the sublimity of the degree when carefully and properly conferred. After partaking of a right royal banquet, and the cigars furnished by the brethren of Maroa, the visiting brothers again boarded the train for home. The train was in charge of Bro. C. J. HOLT, train master of the road, and Bro. Walter MATHIAS had hold of the throttle. The run was made in quick time, and at 12 o'clock they were all home.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 24, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Bill HOUSTON made his escape from the poor farm one day last week and came to Clinton. He did not put in an appearance in town, but hid in the woods. Last Sunday he was recaptured and sent back to the farm. Poor Bill is crazy on the subject of money and imagines that he is the owner of great wealth out of which he is being defrauded. So long as he is kept busy at work he is easily managed by the superintendent of the farm. Some arrangements ought to be made to send him to one of the Soldiers' Homes. His removal from the neighborhood might break the hallucination that he labors under, for he thinks his wealth is in Clinton and his mind continually wanders in this direction.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 24, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The city of Clinton has two lively lawsuits on hand for the next term of the circuit court. W. W. McABOY sues the city for $10,000 damages for injuries which he claims his wife received by a defective sidewalk, and Jim FRANKLIN wants $5,000 to heal the wounds he received by slipping his foot through a broken plank in the sidewalk

(See McABOY)

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The case of James FRANKLIN against the City of Clinton was tried yesterday. One dark night last March Mr. Franklin was going home, and while passing over the sidewalk near Mr. William BRITTIN's property he claimed that he tripped and fell and sprained his ankle. He claimed that the walk was bad and that many of the boards were loose or torn up. Mr. Franklin failed to make good his case. His testimony was contradicted by his own principal witness. The case was submitted to the jury last evening when court adjourned and at two o'clock this morning a verdict was decided upon that the city was not responsible for Mr. Franklin's injuries. Only one of the jurymen contended for a verdict in Franklin's favor.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. N. J. RUNBECK's little nine-month-old girl had a narrow escape from death on Wednesday. The child was eating bread, a crumb of which stuck in her throat. For a few minutes it seemed almost impossible that the child could live as she became black in the face and her body and feet began to swell and get cold. Before the arrival of a physician, the mother succeeded in dislodging the bread from the child's throat and its recovery was speedy.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Rolla DRAGSTREM, of Waynesville, went over to Peoria last Monday on a freight train and took with him a pocket-book containing nearly $500. At Peoria, Rolla went into a saloon to treat the conductor and brakeman and there discovered that he had lost his pocket-book. It was at once suspected that a couple of hard-looking tramps who were in the caboose of the freight train had stolen it, and Rolla and the train men immediately started in search of them. The tramps were found in a house of ill-fame, and on searching one of them the money was found, but the pocket-book and papers had been thrown away. The tramps said they found the pocket-book on the floor of the caboose. Rolla was happy on discovering his wealth.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A gang of thieves were arrested at Mansfield on Tuesday afternoon by Marshal THOMAS, of Farmer City, on a charge of burglarizing the farm house of Charles W. McKINLEY, who lives near Parnell. Some of the goods were found in their possession, and the thieves were brought back to Farmer City, where they had a preliminary examination before Justice MORELAND. They gave their names as WELCH, STAFFORD, BURNS and STOLBURT. Not being able to put up the collateral of $300 each, they were brought to Clinton and turned over to Sheriff GARDINER. As the grand jury have indicted the four, they will have a free excursion to Joliet.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WHAT IT COST TO THUMP AN EDITOR

R. T. SPENCER is the editor of the Kenney Gazette. Before he became an editor he taught school. This was his misfortune for he knew too much about Webster's dictionary. Last January Jim BRELSFORD concluded to emigrate from Kenney and go to Texas, and as he owed a little bill, which his creditor thought he might lose, the creditor had Jim arrested on a writ of ne exeat and brought him to Clinton. Jim paid the bill. In the next issue of the Gazette, Spencer aired his knowledge of the Latin language by giving a free translation in his paper of the meaning of the term ne exeat. Jim did not like the literal translation, and a day or two after he met Spencer at the post-office in Kenney and thumped him unmercifully. Jim is a great, big, double-fisted fellow, and a blow from him would be like the kick of a mule, while poor Spencer looks as if he were the last rose of summer and ready to drop from the bush. Joe DEIHL rushed into the fray to rescue Spencer from the grasp of Jim Brelsford, but Ald. FERGUSON was Jim's second in the fight, and he asked Joe Deihl if "he wanted any of it." Joe didn't care about investing, especially as Ald. Ferguson is a bad man in a tussle, so he backed out and left poor Spencer in the hands of the Philistines. Dr. Frank HOWARD, however, appeased the wrath of Brelsford, and Spencer was rescued. Spencer was bruised up about the face. Brelsford was arrested and taken before Justice GRAHAM. He plead guilty and was fined the regulation price of $5 and costs. Then the State's attorney invited Brelsford and Ferguson to an interview before the county court, and here again they were fined and had the costs to pay. Spencer wanted damages and he sued Brelsford for $1000. The case was tried at the March term of the circuit court, when the jury returned a verdict in favor of Brelsford. This was so manifestly unjust that the Judge set the verdict aside. Last Tuesday the case came up again, and this time Spencer got a verdict in his favor for $47.50. It ought to have been $500, but the amount given will be a warning to people not to thump an editor when he is trying to educate them to a knowledge of the Latin language. The costs in this case will be about $55, and add the judgment and costs to what Brelsford had to pay in the police and county courts and it will foot up nearly $200.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Minnie B. WATSON, the little five-year-old daughter of Mr. Ben WATSON, of Bloomington, was in Clinton the other day with her father on a visit. Minnie is a musical prodigy. While here she entertained her friends with some selections on the piano and vocal pieces. She can play and sing the most difficult pieces at sight and in style and manner that would be creditable to older artists. The gift is natural to her, for since she was three years old she has been able to play the piano.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On Thursday evening, after the fair, Mr. Jake ZIEGLER, on his way home, stopped at Mr. Henry SIMPSON's house for supper. He hitched his horse at the front of the house. While the family were at supper they heard a lot of drunken ruffians driving by in a wagon. The fellows ran their wagon into Mr. Ziegler's buggy, overturning the buggy and breaking the wheels, axle and shafts. Someone passing by a few minutes later went into Mr. Simpson's house and told Mr. Ziegler of the smash-up.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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August 31, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Last Tuesday was William CATTERLIN's 28th birthday, and in order to remind him of the fact his wife made arrangements to surprise him. A number of guests were invited to be present, and in the evening when Bill arrived home he was greeted by a pleasant little assemblage who had gathered to do honor to the occasion. With a few exclamations of, "Well, well!" he calmly resigned himself to his fate. Billy was the recipient of an elegant chair from his wife.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 7, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. W. W. McABOY sued the city of Clinton for $10,000 damages for injuries she claimed to have received in the month of May, 1882, by reason of a defect in the sidewalk on South Monroe street, on the west end of Mrs. CRANG's property. The case was tried on Tuesday before Judge LACEY and a jury, Mrs. McAboy being represented by Mr. R. A. LEMON and the city by City Attorney HARRIS and Col. WARNER. The case was given to the jury on Tuesday evening, and during the night and till Wednesday afternoon the twelve good men and true wrestled with it. Two of the jurymen were in favor of giving Mrs. McAboy a small amount, but the other ten could not see that the city was in any way responsible, as the testimony in the case showed that the sidewalk was not really in a dangerous condition. It may be true that the lady tripped, but one of the witnesses swore that she did not exhibit any signs of being injured when she passed her house a few minutes after the accident. The jury finally united in a verdict against Mrs. McAboy.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 7, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Perry ROBERTS, the long-legged barber who worked in Frank HULL's shop, wishes now that he had died before he stole Jack ROBINSON's coat. He might have been in his grave or on the dissecting table in the back room of some Clinton doctor's office, but he would have escaped being a guest of Sheriff GARDINER. Perry wanted to sleep in Jack Robinson's room the other night and Jack kindly consented. Some time during the night Roberts got up, but, unlike the Arab, instead of folding his tent he rolled up Jack's new coat and silently stole away. He was not satisfied with stealing the new coat, but he hunted up other valuables that were in Jack's room and took them with him. Roberts took the train next morning for Decatur, where he pawned the coat and had a parrot of a time on the proceeds. Jack found out where Roberts had gone and had a warrant sworn out for his arrest. Not being able to get an officer to execute the warrant, Jack started for Decatur, found his man, got the pawn ticket and redeemed his coat, and then brought Roberts to Clinton and handed him over to the sheriff. As Roberts has no money and no friends, he will have to remain in jail till the December term, and then he will be furnished a free excursion ticket to Joliet. Roberts loves whisky, and this is what whisky has done for Roberts.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 7, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Hi. CALLAHAN was a member of the order of Knights of Pythias in Maroa. He was a married man. Not long ago he insured his life for $5000, but had not paid all of the premium when he was taken sick in Minnesota, whither he had gone on business. News came back to Maroa that Mr. Callahan would die, and in order to secure the benefits of the insurance to his family, his brother Knights raised by subscription among themselves the $75 he was still in arrears on his insurance, and the money was paid over to the agent. As the result of this brotherly forethought Mrs. Callahan will get the full amount of $5000 for which her husband was insured. Almost a similar case occurred in Clinton not long ago. A member of a lodge of Knights of Pythias in this county was in arrears on his assessments to the endowment fund. A member of the lodge learned in time that the assessment had not been paid and he settled the amount and saved for the widow the $2000 for which her husband's life was insured. People may rail against secret societies, but the incidents above related show the good that is being done in a quiet way by the members to help each other.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 7, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HAD THE JIM-JAMS.

Dr. J. V. WALLACE came to Clinton a few weeks ago to take charge of Dr. GRIFFITH's dental office. He was a stranger here to everybody but got some business because Dr. Griffith had a number of patients. From the day he first arrived in Clinton till he left, Wallace was constantly under the influence of liquor, and for the greater part of the time he was totally unfitted for business. He had no reputation as a dentist, and in fact was not even recognized in the profession, having no diploma from the State authorities. One day last week the marshal threatened to arrest Wallace, and on Thursday he left town and went to Decatur. There he put up at the St. Nicholas Hotel, announcing himself as a prominent dentist of Clinton. During Thursday night and Friday, Wallace had an attack of delirium tremens and threatened to shoot anybody who would enter his room at the hotel. Finally the proprietors of the St. Nicholas had him arrested and locked up in the Decatur calaboose. On Tuesday he was arraigned for disorderly conduct. The police magistrate fined him $10 and costs, and as Wallace had no money he was ordered on the chain gang to work out his fine. On Wednesday evening some parties in this city took up a collection and raised the money, which was sent to Decatur, and we presume Wallace was released. He will not be allowed to resume business in Dr. Griffith's office.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 7, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Henry FARMER, the livery stable keeper of Farmer City, rented a horse and buggy on Tuesday night to a stranger to go to Arrowsmith, in McLean county. Both man and horse have disappeared and Farmer is now telegraphing all over the country to the police to be on the lookout for them.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 21, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Geo. BENNISON and A. D. BLUE, with their families, left Texas township last Monday morning for Umatilla county, Oregon. They were accompanied by Mr. E. C. CLAFLIN, of DeWitt, who goes to the new country in search of a fortune.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 21, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

We learn from Hillsboro, Ill., that the Rev. G. W. HENNING, who was for years pastor of the M. E. Church in this city, has been incapacitated for work on account of his eyesight. Mr. Henning has been afflicted for years with his eyes, and the probabilities are now that he will have to retire from the ministry. There is some talk of his going back to California.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 5, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

RAILROADS MUST FENCE.

A case of great importance to farmers living on the lines of railways has recently been decided by the Supreme Court. Mr. J. A. ZIEGLER owns a farm in Texas township, through which the Wabash railway runs. The company did not comply with the law and fence their right of way after being repeatedly notified. Finally Mr. Ziegler, to protect his stock, built a fence on the land belonging to the company's right of way and then commenced suit for double the price of the cost of the fence. This, the statutes allowed him to do. The case was first tried in the county court, Judge INGHAM presiding, and a judgment was rendered in favor of Mr. Ziegler for $1000. The Wabash company appealed the case to the appellate court, and there the judgment of the lower court was affirmed. Not satisfied with this the Wabash company took the case up to the Supreme Court, and again the judgment was sustained. This decision settles the important question of compelling railroad corporations to fence their right of way. LEMON & BURROUGHS were the attorneys for Mr. Zielger.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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September 28, 1883
Clinton Public

WANTED TO DIE.
Girl Takes Ten Grains of Strychnine and Yet Lives.

Nancy ARMSTRONG is the oldest unmarried daughter of Mr. Ira ARMSTRONG and is about twenty-two years of age.  For more than a year past she has been living in the family of D. L. MOODY at DeLand, where she fell in love with a young man named AUSTIN, who boarded in the house.  Austin is a farm laborer and during the threshing season was employed with a gang of threshing machine hands.  Nancy was engaged to be married to Austin and she expected that before long the words that were to unite her to him for life would be spoken by a minister of the gospel or a justice of the peace.  Austin it seems must have changed his mind about getting married, for suddenly he left DeLand and went to the far, far west.  The girl still lived in hopes that he would fulfill his vows of love and make her his wife, and was anxiously expecting a letter from him.  A couple of weeks ago she came to her father’s house on a visit and told her friends of her intended marriage.  Every day she anxiously inquired at the post-office for a letter, but none came.  Before returning to DeLand she left word that if a letter came for her it should be immediately forwarded to that place.

Wednesday morning she came back to Clinton on the Wabash train, and a little after ten o’clock she called at the post-office, but no letter was there to relieve the suspense of her anxious heart.  Probably she came to the conclusion that Austin had deserted her, and in a fit of desperation she determined to seek rest in the grave where faithless lovers would never more bring sadness to her heart, for she went direct from the post-office to a drug store and bought a small bottle of strychnine, containing about twenty grains.  With the death potion in her pocket she went home and coolly proceeded to empty about half the contents of the bottle into a piece of paper.  This she wrapped up and swallowed, afterward taking a drink of water to wash down the poisonous drug.  Then she went to her stepmother and told her what she had done, and showed her the bottle as proof of the quantity she had taken.  The Armstrong family live in the old Smith house, opposite Dr. WRIGHT’s residence.  Mrs. Armstrong took the bottle from the girl’s hand and went over to Dr. Wright’s and told him what the girl had done.  When the Doctor saw how much of the strychnine had been taken from the bottle he thought of course that the girl was surely booked for a coroner’s inquest.  He hastened over to the house and there found the girl in the first symptoms of spasms.  He applied immediate antidotes, but before he could get the stomach pump ready for use the spasms had become so violent that he could not use it.  Nothing could be got down her throat, not even a fluid.  The Doctor could see no hope for her recovery, so he put her under the influence of chloral in order to make her unconscious to pain.  The slightest pressure on one of her muscles or even an attempt to feel her pulse would bring on the spasms, which would last from ten to fifteen minutes at a time.  To the surprise of the Doctor the girl still lived, and later in the day he began to hope that as soon as he could get medicine into her stomach it might act as an antidote and save her.

To sum it all up, the girl still lives, and this morning she told her father the whole circumstances of her attempt upon her life.  With this the world has nothing to do, therefore THE PUBLIC made no attempt to peer into the mystery.  This is the second time that Nancy has hovered on the brink of the grave, she having taken a dose of laudanum once before.  She is now satisfied with her efforts at leaving this world, and in the future will leave strychnine and laudanum severely alone.

[Note: Nancy died 10/04/1883, see OBITUARIES, and the story continues 10/12/1883

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public

TOO LATE!
The Letter That Might Have Saved Nancy Armstrong’s Life.

The day that Nancy ARMSTRONG committed suicide she was anxiously expecting a letter from her betrothed lover, Bissell AUSTIN.  she had been acquainted with him for more than a year, having lived in DeLand in the same house in which he boarded.  Austin left DeLand and went to Missouri, promising Nancy before he left that he would write to her as soon as he got to his journey’s end.  After waiting a reasonable length of time she became impatient to hear from her lover.  Days probably appeared as months to her, but no letter came.  While she was on a visit to Clinton from her temporary home in DeLand she visited the post-office two or three times a day and anxiously inquired for the expected letter.  But none came.  When she was to return to DeLand she left orders to have her mail forwarded as soon as it arrived.  She went to DeLand but could not remain there.  The town appeared desolate to her, for he upon whom her affections were centered was gone.  She could not stand the suspense, and after a couple of weeks back she came to Clinton.  The morning of her arrival here she called at the post-office again, but the long-expected letter had not arrived.

Where was Austin all this time?  It seems from later developments that he went to Missouri in search of work, and was lucky in finding a job on a new railroad that was being built.  Nancy  did not know his whereabouts, therefore she could not write to him.  Probably he was waiting for some favorable turn in his fortunes before writing to her.

Hope deferred maketh the heart sick.  On the morning that Nancy Armstrong called at the Clinton  post-office and received no tidings from her lover she must have then determined upon the fatal course she took within an hour afterward, for she deliberately went from the office to a drug store and bought a small phial of strychnine.  Returning to her father’s house with the death potion in her pocket, she emptied half the contents of the phial into a paper, rolled it up and then swallowed the fatal dose.  Then calmly going to her stepmother she told her what she had done.  Medical aid was called and everything was done that science could suggest to save the unfortunate girl’s life.  She lived a week and then died.

While in her lucid moments her heart went out to the absent lover, and her only desire was that she might hear from him once more and then she would be resigned to the fate that was then inevitable.  The heart-broken girl now sleeps quietly beside her mother in the church yard at Waynesville.

Bissell Austin it seems had not forgotten the girl whose affections he had won.  On last Monday a letter came from him addressed to Nancy Armstrong, which was opened by her father.  In it Austin gave an account of his varying fortunes since he left Clinton.  He was then at work on the railroad, but expected to leave there and go to Kansas as soon as his month was up and he could draw his pay.  He renewed his vows of love and promised as soon as he could find a place in which to locate he would send money to pay her passage to him or he would come in person.  This is in substance the contents of the letter.  Poor Nancy!  Had she received this letter two weeks before she might have been spared the sad ending of a suicide.  Probably by this time Austin will have received the news that the girl who loved him took her own life rather than live in uncertainty of his whereabouts.

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public

CURRENT TOPICS.

Groceries cheap at INMAN'S.

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Dry goods cheap at INMAN'S store.

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Mr. and Mrs. Amos JOHNSON, of Ellinwood, Kansas, are in the city visiting relatives.

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Owing to illness, Rev. E. A. SPRING, of the Baptist Church, was unable to fill his pulpit last Sunday.

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This has been an unpleasant week. Rain nearly every day and the mud getting uncomfortably deep.

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John W. SHORT, of the Clinton marble works, put up a costly monument in the Monticello cemetery this week.

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Several fine specimens of corn can be seen in the post-office window. If they are fair samples, our farmers need not feel blue.

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Albert HALL is running a steam wood-sawing machine and is kept busy cutting up the winter's supply of wood for our citizens.

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One farmer near Mt. Pulaski has lost over five hundred hogs by cholera during the past summer. The disease prevailed to considerable extent in Logan county.

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FLOYD, the well-known hotel keeper who formerly lived in Clinton, has leased the new hotel at Sibley and will open up in a few days. Mrs. FLOYD was in Clinton on Friday.

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Col. SNELL bought two or three thorough-bred Norman brood mares last week and intends to add to the number and go into the business of raising first-class horses.

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The G.A.R. Post at Wapella invited the Clinton Post to visit them on last Friday night, but owing to the mud and darkness but few went. Those who did go had a jolly time and a big supper.

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The Knights of Pythias of this city expect to go to Peoria on next Tuesday to attend the annual meeting of the grand lodge. The lodge will go in full uniform and take part in the great parade which takes place on Wednesday.

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Mrs. BOWREN desires to call the attention of the ladies to the new fall stock of millinery just received and on exhibition. The latest styles in hats and in all kinds of goods that enter into a lady's wardrobe. Remember the store, next to the post-office.

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A. W. RAZEY has closed up his billiard saloon in the Magill House and moved the tables to the room lately occupied by J. S. WILSON as a confectionery. Now that Abe has got a room on the square he expects to do more business.

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Mr. VANSICKLE, living near Farmer City, had a horse killed by lightning. The animal was insured in one of the companies which J. H. CONKLIN represents, and yesterday Mr. Vansickle received a draft for $100. It paid him to be insured.

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Sheriff GARDINER has leased the Converse property on Main street, east of the agricultural works, and will move his family there some time next week. The sheriff's family is tired of being in jail. Deputy Sheriff MORGAN will move into the jail with his family.

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There will be no services at the Baptist Church in this city for one month, owing to repairs being made on said house of worship. The pastor will have a vacation until their house is re-opened. The Sunday-school will be held at the usual hour in Rundle's hall.

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One week from tomorrow, Saturday, October 20, the administrator of the late B. F. BARNETT will sell at public auction the personal property belonging to the estate. In the list is a number of brood mares of Norman stock, four mules, and a lot of cattle, hogs and sheep.

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Frank DAVIDSON's loss at his tile factory, by the fire a week ago last Sunday night, was adjusted this week, and he was paid $1000 for the damage done to his building and for the broken tile. J. H. CONKLIN is the agent for the companies in which Mr. Davidson was insured.

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Two years ago Jerry WOOD moved with his family from Weldon to near Golden City, Mo., where he bought a farm. Jerry and his wife came back to DeWitt county this week to visit their relatives and old friends. It is a pleasure to know that he is prospering in his new home.

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Frank WEIKLE, who works in the Central coal sheds, had his right hand nipped between a couple of cars on Wednesday morning. Two of the fingers and the palm of the hand were badly crushed, and it is more than probable that the fingers will have to be amputated. (See next article)

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This week Mr. S. K. CARTER received a notice from the pension department at Washington that the claim of Henry GESSFORD, of DeLand, formerly a member of the Forty-first Illinois Infantry, has been allowed. Mr. Gessford gets $912 back pension and $4 a month hereafter.

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T. M. WELLS, the photographic artist, is now completing the building of a nice residence for his family on the corner of Jackson street. Mr. Wells has been fortunate in his business since he came to Clinton, and now that he has built a home for his family it is an evidence that he expects to remain here permanently.

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John. W. GORDON cut a gash in his right leg, below the knee, on Tuesday while he was working on a building for Mr. Bishop. At first he thought the cut would only be a slight affair, but he finally had to quit work. On Wednesday the knee swelled so badly that he was compelled to walk with crutches.

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George W. CORDER was preparing his room on the southwest corner of the square for a drug store, but concluding that there would probably be more demand for groceries than for quinine, he abandoned the drug idea and this week bought out Oakford & Spicer's grocery in Union Block. Mr. Corder is an old hand at the grocery business, and he proposes to increase his stock and sell at prices that will command the attention of buyers.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Baptized in the Sangamon River.

"I will never forget my ducking in this place," said Mr. Wm. FULLER the other morning, as he was riding in the cars with some Clintonians to Springfield, as the train passed over the Sangamon bridge. "When the Gilman, Clinton and Springfield company were building the bridge down here," said he, "the hands got on a strike on account of some misunderstanding with the contractors. The company was anxious to get the road completed, so one of the officers sent word to me and asked if I would come down and try and straighten out the difficulty. The most of the hands were on the other side of the river and I wanted to cross over and talk with them. There was a boat tied to the bank of the stream and I thought, of course, that it would be no trick at all to row myself over. I got into the boat and pushed out from the shore, and the darned thing began to wobble about so that I could not sit down on the seat. Finally I made an effort and over the boat capsized, pitching me into the river. The water was nearly up to my chin, and I tell you I made tracks as quick as possible for the shore. The boat drifted down stream and the men on the shore shouted to me to catch it and not let it get away. Just then the boat could have gone to thunder for all I cared; I was too much interested in getting on dry land again." "I am satisfied," said Mr. Fuller, "that if I had got out farther in the river I should have been drowned, as I knew no more about swimming than a spring chicken." Mr. Fuller concluded his story by telling of the experience he had in getting his clothes dry. It was a cold, bitter day in March, and he had nothing to change with, so he had to sit by the fire all day and let the clothes dry as best they could. He has never tried any experiments in boating since.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

After Many Years.

In 1866, Dr. WARNER and his daughter Flora were taking a trip through the Shenandoah Valley, in Virginia. The Doctor is a native of that State, and he had some interest as well as curiosity to see how Virginia looked just at the close of the war. There were no railroads in the Shenandoah, and the Doctor had to travel by stage coach. It was early in the month of July. The weather was intensely hot, and what with the gentle swaying of the coach and the heat, the Doctor fell asleep. His daughter took his hat to hold, and it seems she, too, fell asleep. At any rate out went the new hat in the road, and when the Doctor got to the end of the stage route he had to buy a new one. A couple of weeks ago Miss COWAN, a cousin of the Doctor, came to Clinton on a visit. Miss Cowan lives in the Shenandoah, near where the Doctor lost his hat. One day while in conversation, the Doctor mentioned to Miss Cowan about the loss of his hat. "Why," said she, "was that yours? My father, on a Sunday morning in July, 1866, found a nice new hat on the road and brought it home. He inquired of everybody around there to see if he could find the owner, but nobody claimed the hat. Then he concluded to wear it himself, and did so till the hat was worn out." The Doctor's hat, after all, was still in the family even if he didn't have the pleasure of wearing it himself.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

PERSONAL.

Miss Kate JEFFREY's of Roachdale, Ind., is the guest of Mrs. W. B. HALL.

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John SYLVESTER has sold his farm near Weldon and is going to Kansas.

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Mrs. Alex ROGERS left Clinton on Wednesday for a six months' visit to her daughter and sister in Ohio.

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Tom FULLER, who has been in Ohio for the past three months, arrived at home on Wednesday. Tom looks much improved and he thinks the trip helped him.

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Miss Minnie COHEN, of Bloomington, is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Morris STURM. It is rumored that Miss Cohen will soon change her name and take that of a Chicago merchant.

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Mr. Sam WATTS, of Winfield, Kansas, is back in DeWitt county visiting his old home. Mr. Watts is an enthusiastic believer in the possibilities of Kansas and says for climate and production it will beat the world.

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Henry DAHL came over to Clinton from Saybrook on Tuesday to see his old friends and try and collect some of his old claims. Mr. Dahl's first year in Saybrook was a profitable one, he having sold over $12,000 worth of boots and shoes.

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Mr. J. F. MILLER writes home from Wellington, Kansas, that he will be back in Clinton by tomorrow. At Wellington he met a large number of Clintonians, all of whom seem to be prosperous.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. S. E. PALMER owns a farm in Creek township, and she has had some trouble to get an outlet for the water which submerges part of her land. She had about three thousand tile on the place ready to be put in, and last night some vandals went through the pile with a club and left scarcely a whole tile in the lot. This is certainly a courageous way to fight a widow.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

About two weeks ago a well-dressed man, who was a cripple, made a canvass of this city for the sale of music, representing himself as an agent of Brainard & Sons, of Cleveland, Ohio. He succeeded in selling nearly $100 worth, collected the money, and promised to send the music at once. The purchasers have waited anxiously, but no music has come, nor is it likely the agent will ever be heard of again here. It is always safer to deal with home merchants.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

About four weeks ago Charles DICKERSON, a freight conductor on the Central road, was down at Centralia, and while going from the depot in the dark he was set upon by a couple of men and badly pounded. In the melee, Charley had one of his legs fractured, and since then he was compelled to use crutches. He has not to this day the least idea who the men were nor had he said or done anything to cause the attack. They evidently mistook Charley for someone else and gave him the pounding they intended for their friend.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Edgar PHARES rode up from Maroa to Clinton last Monday behind a spirited three-year-old horse. The horse got along well enough till he came to the iron bridge which crosses Coon Creek, at the south end of Madison street. Here he became frightened and came near overturning the buggy. Coming on a little farther the horse concluded to have a runaway, and Edgar was pitched out into the street. When Edgar returned to Maroa, he led the horse, preferring walking to riding behind such an unruly animal.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 12, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DARING CATTLE THEFT.

Early on Wednesday morning a man was seen driving seven head of fine steers from the HARROLD farm in Wapella township, which is rented by FOLEY & DAVIS for pasture. As the fellow went at it boldly, none of the neighbors dreamed that there was anything wrong being done. Late in the day someone asked Nick FOLEY to whom he had been selling some of his cattle, and then Nick for the first time heard of the theft. Ike FOLEY lives on the Harrold place to take care of the cattle, but he had neither seen the man nor missed the cattle. Search was at once instituted. As it rained the night before, the cattle could be tracked for some distance till a point was reached where they were pided, four being driven in one direction and three in another. The trace was followed up, but our informant had not learned, when he told the story to THE PUBLIC, whether or not the cattle had been found. They were extra heavy steers, and were worth not less than $50 each.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 19, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Miss Minnie LISENBY has been visiting in Weldon this week.

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Mr. J. F. MILLER got back home on Tuesday from his western trip.

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Robert GALLAHER returned Saturday from a trip through the West.

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Mrs. CARNES, of Ohio, is here visiting relatives and her daughter Susie.

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Dr. CALHOUN went to Decatur yesterday to attend the soldiers' reunion.

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Rev. O. B. THAYER is attending the meeting of the Presbyterian Synod, at Alton, this week.

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Mrs. M. M. DeLEVIS returned home Tuesday evening from an extended visit in Lincoln, Neb.

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Rev. E. A. SPRING will preach at the Presbyterian Church on Sunday morning, at 11 o'clock.

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Mrs. B. L. MICHAELS is attending the fair and visiting friends and relatives at Centralia this week.

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Mrs. NIXON and daughter, Della, leave next Wednesday for Kansas City where they will spend the winter.

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Warmth and sunshine followed the heavy rains of last night, but the roads are almost impassable on account of the mud.

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Mrs. Morris STURM and her children are in Chicago this week visiting the family of Mr. Henry KATZ. Mr. M. STURM will go to Chicago tomorrow night and spend a week viewing the sights.

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The members of Frank Lowry Post, G.A.R., are notified to meet in their hall on next Sunday morning, at nine o'clock, in uniform, at attend the funeral of Comrade George W. CROWDEN. —J. A. Edmiston, P.C.

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The ladies of the Baptist Church will give a social and supper at the residence of Mrs. F. J. FACKRELL, North Main street, on Friday evening, Oct. 26. Supper 25 cents, given in aid of church repairs. All are cordially invited.

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By new arrangements, the morning train from the south on the Central road, arrives in Clinton about half an hour earlier, and the passengers get breakfast at HAINES' dining hall. This will be a good thing for Mr. Haines.

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Dr. GOODBRAKE and Col. Pash WARNER are in Cleveland, Ohio, this week, attending the annual reunion of the Army of the Tennessee. Mr. Samuel MAGILL also stopped over in Cleveland, on his return trip from Washington, to take a look at the old veterans and enjoy the banquet and speeches.

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W. W. TURNER, for some time a law student in the office of Judge GRAHAM, and later a law student in Brooklyn, Iowa, was recently admitted to the Iowa bar. Mr. Turner was for years a prominent teacher in DeWitt county, and is an industrious young man. His friends will be glad to hear of his success thus far and will hope it may be continued.

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W. H. GILLESPIE, formerly yard engineer in Wapella and Clinton for the Central road, is in Clinton this week visiting his old friends. Mr. Gillespie moved from Clinton two years ago to San Antonio, Texas, where he is running a passenger engine. He will probably come back to the Central, if opportunity offers, as he and his family are tired of Texas.

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The members of the Christian Church in this city are almost unanimously in favor of building a new meeting house next summer and, ere long, steps will be taken for the accomplishment of that end. The old house will be repaired sufficiently to make it comfortable and will be used through the winter. Until the repairs are completed, the Sunday-school and social meetings will be held in RUNDLE's hall.

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Frank WEIKLE , the man who had his hands mashed between two cars at the Central coal sheds last week, has unfortunately been compelled to have two of his fingers amputated. This will probably cripple him for several months so that he will not be able to work. As the accident occurred to Weikle while he was coupling cars, which he was not required to do, the company will only pay the doctor's bill.

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Rev. E. J. HAMILL, of Pana, will return to Clinton next Monday and complete the organization of the lodge of Good Templars, which he has been working up for some time past. The charter and supplies have already been forwarded. All persons who have signified their willingness to take hold of the work, and all others who want to become interested, are requested to meet in RUNDLE's hall at 7:30 o'clock p.m., on the same date.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 19, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Dr. C. BURNS, one of the old-time residents of Clinton, is here on a visit to his son-in-law, Mr. J. H. SCHMITH, the jeweler. Dr. Burns was a boy when he lived in Clinton and worked for Dr. WARNER and others. He was here when they built the court-house, and he says that at that time it was considered one of the finest buildings in Central Illinois, and that Clinton and DeWitt county was proud of their enterprise in building it. The Doctor is now a leading dentist in Greensburg, Ind., and has a large paying practice. He feels some interest in Clinton now that he has a daughter living here and expects to make occasional visits to this town.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 26, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

By an advertisement in last week's PUBLIC, it will be seen that a representative from the pension agency of Milo B. Stevens & Co., who have offices in Washington and Chicago, will be in Clinton on next Tuesday to work among the soldiers, and, if possible, get them to put their claims in their hands for the securing of pensions. Since the official publication of the lists of pensioners, the whole country is flooded with circulars by these agents, and it is more than likely that thousands of dollars will find their way into their pockets without a dollar returning to the soldiers. The pension agency business has been an immense fraud, and soldiers who have trusted their claims to these foreign agents have had to pay dear for the whistle even though in the end their claim was allowed. It is always safer to entrust such business in the hands of home attorneys, for then the claimant is sure of paying only the legal fees and he will get honest service. During the past two or three weeks, tons of such circulars have loaded down the mails. The claim agent holds out the tempting bait that nearly every man is entitled to a pension, and it is human nature for a man to apply for what he thinks he ought to have. After opening a correspondence the agent then makes a small demand on the applicant for money to pay postage, and then again he calls for a part of his fee, and so on, till he gets a few dollars from each man. It is true the money comes into the agent's pocket in small sums, but in the aggregate it amounts to a fortune. The most unblushing robbery has been perpetrated on the soldiers by these Washington claim agents, till at last the department has shut down upon a majority of them and will not allow them to do business at all. This week a number of agents have been published because of their disreputable practices, and among them is the firm of Milo B. Stevens & Co. We would, therefore, warn the soldiers of this county not to be drawn into any trap by the agent who will be here on next Tuesday. Every soldier who has a meritorious claim can have the business attended to without entrusting it to men who are denounced by the pension department.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 26, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

KENNEY.

B. B. IVES is clerking for R. ROBBINS this week. Burt is a good hand for the business.

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Win PERRY, who has been on the sick list, is gaining slowly. He has had the typhoid fever.

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Reuben WATTS is going to school this winter. He will be found at the broad-gauge part of the time.

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James MORRISON, of Tunbridge, who has just recovered from a severe attack of typhoid fever, has gone to Bone Gap, Edgar county, to take a position as agent on the P. D. & E. road.

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Mrs. A. IVES, who has been very bad with dropsy for several months, is gradually failing, and it is feared her time is limited for this world.

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Dan RUNG made a flying trip to Clinton, Wednesday.

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Lew WATTS and his bonny bride have settled down to housekeeping. Lew seems to be happy.

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Chas. MURPHY is traveling for the Decatur marble works.

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Jim BATEMAN has gone where the woodbine twineth. So has the Democrat. (See related article)

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Mrs. Fred EASTMAN has returned from her visit to friends in Michigan.

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Mr. and Mrs. Stephen HUTCHIN have been visiting friends in Bloomington the past week.

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Mr. MERRIMAN is having some repairing done on his neat little property in the north part of town.

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L. C. WATTS and wife went to housekeeping this week in the property north of Orr & Johnson's store. May they be happy in the life-long journey they have undertaken together.

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A party in honor of Leila OWSLEY's 16th birthday was given at the residence of Dr. OWSLEY last Saturday evening. About twenty-five guests were present. The affair was a very happy occasion and was a complete surprise to Miss Leila, she having been sent to the country till after the arrival of her friends. On her return she found a gay assembly and an elegant supper, which her mother had secretly prepared, awaiting her. She received a number of handsome presents from her young companions. The evening passed pleasantly with music and games and the company dispersed at a late hour, wishing their lovely hostess many returns of the same.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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October 26, 1883 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

It was an unfortunate day for Jim BATEMAN when he began to edit a Democratic paper in Kenney. The first day his new paper was issued he celebrated the event by getting gloriously drunk, and from that time till last week he kept going from bad to worse till he finally whipped his wife. Then Jim came to his senses and left Kenney for a time. The Democrat has suspended and Jim has gone where the woodbine twineth. We hope Jim's fate will be a warning to other Republicans who have any intention of joining the ranks of the Democracy.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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November 2, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Hallow E'en.

The last night in the month of October is called Hallow E'en, of which the young people of the present day know but little of its history. In this country the young folks spend the early part of the night in cutting up pranks on staid citizens who are soundly sleeping in their beds. Door bells are rung, cabbage patches are raided and the cabbages are tied to door knobs, gates are unhinged and carried from one part of the town to the other. This is about the way the Clinton boys and girls did last Wednesday night. In the old country, and among old country people who immigrated to this country, the night was differently observed in the good old days of yore. A tub of water was placed in the center of the kitchen floor, in which would be a lot of apples floating on the water. The boys and girls ducked their heads into the water, with their hands behind their backs, and caught the floating apples in their teeth. Then would come bobbing for apples. A string would be suspended from the ceiling, on the end of which an apple would be fastened. The boys and girls ranged themselves on each side of the room, the apple would pass from side to side like a pendulum, and the boy or girl who caught the apple in their teeth was the victor in the game. Many a tap would they get on mouth or nose from the apple, but who cared for such trifling mishaps. Another trick was to tie two sticks across each other, making four points. On two of the points were pieces of lighted tallow candles and on the other ends were stuck apples. This, also, was suspended from the ceiling. Around it the boys and girls were grouped and the cross-sticks were whirled. It was fun to see the dodging to catch the apples, but just as often they would get a mouthful of hot tallow from the candles. Then there was grabbing for raisins burning in a dish with brandy; roasting nuts in the hot coals, and every simple amusement that could be invented for the night's sports. Old and young were children for that one night. In Scotland the young maidens looked forward to Hallow E'en with peculiar interest, for spells were tried by which the unmarried folks were to discover whether or not they should marry or lead a single life. Burns immortalizes Hallow E'en in his quaint Scotch verses:

"Wee Jennie to her granddame said:
   Will you gae wi' me, grannie?
I'll eat the apple at the glass
   I got fra' uncle Jamie."

The superstition was that Jennie, while eating the apple at midnight before the looking glass, would see the face of her future husband peering over her left shoulder. Another superstition was for Jennie to go out into the night with a handful of hemp seed, and while walking around the well, scatter it, singing as she went:

"Hemp seed I sow, Hemp seed I sow,
He who is my love to be,
Come after me and mow."

The phantom of the future husband was seen pulling the hemp, which sprang out of the ground as it was sown. Two girls would go out into the garden blindfolded and each pull a head of cabbage. If the cabbage was well-shaped, the future husband would be good-looking; if crooked and ill-shaped, so would be the husband. But in this practical age we are drifting away from all such pleasing superstitions. It is doubtful if we enjoy life as well.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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November 2, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WHERE STEPHEN D. ROBB IS BURIED.

Stephen D. ROBB, of Waynesville, went out as a private in Co. E, Twentieth Illinois Infantry. At the Battle of Shiloh, on the morning of the 6th of April, 1862, one of Robb's comrades fell wounded in the ranks, and while Robb was stooping down to give him aid he was mortally wounded. The regiment fell back and left Robb between them and the advancing rebels. The poor fellow raised himself from the ground and begged his comrades not to leave him, and he then fell back dead. At the close of the fight his comrades buried his body, with nine others of the Twentieth Regiment, in a trench near the place where he fell. More than twenty-two years afterward one of his old comrades finds the grave in the National cemetery at Shiloh. Asa WILSON, of Co. E, and William ARMSTRONG went down to Jackson, Tenn., last week on the Illinois Central railroad excursion, and while there they visited the battlefields that are memorable to every soldier of the Twentieth. The cemetery is a beautiful place, well kept, and has the constant supervision of the government authorities. At grave No. 1786, Asa Wilson found a tombstone on which was cut the name of Stephen D. Robb, and the number of his regiment. John THOMPSON, the first adjutant of the Twentieth, is also buried near where Robb's grave is. There seems to be some dispute among the members of Co. E about Robb's burial at Shiloh. Homer B. TAYLOR, who was drummer-major of the Forty-first Illinois, says that one night he helped to disinter Robb's body from the trench in which it was first buried, and that it was put in a box and sent to this city for burial. There is a mistake somewhere, for the superintendent of the national cemetery at Shiloh claims that every body, where the grave is marked, was identified when it was transferred to the cemetery.

[Note: Page 311, Veteran Burials in Woodlawn Cemetery —ROBB, S. D.; C (Civil War); Army; Co. E; 20th ILL. Inf.; (no date). Name is located in Soldier's Square at Woodlawn but it is believed many merely have markers for memorials and aren't actually buried in Soldier's Square, as there is not enough room for the number of graves required by the number of stones here.]

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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November 2, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

An Item That Will Interest the Old Members of Twentieth Illinois Regiment

When the Twentieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry were in camp in 1861 at Joliet, waiting for orders to march to the South, the major of the regiment, John W. GOODWIN, made a grand splurge on the occasion of his marriage to a young lady of Joliet. It would not do for him to have the knot tied in the ordinary way, so he arranged that the service should be performed on horseback. Goodwin was resplendent in full regimentals, and he and the bride and the officiating minister, the Rev. Dr. BUCK, were all on horseback. Goodwin was a vain and frivolous fellow, and the officers and members of the regiment soon grew weary of his supercilious manner. The result was that when the regiment got to Bird's Point Goodwin came to the conclusion that it would be no injury to the service if he should tender his resignation, and he returned home and went into business at Pontiac. At the close of the war he went to California and located in the town of San Buenaventura, where in the course of time he succeeded in getting the office of postmaster. By this time Goodwin began to tire of the wife he wed on horseback in the camp at Joliet, and he became restless under the matrimonial bonds. Mrs. GOODWIN was a splendid woman and had the respect of everybody in the town in which she lived. Goodwin became enamored of a younger woman. The old love was irksome. How to rid himself of the mother of his children and secure his freedom to marry the woman, with whom he had become infatuated, was the question which troubled him. He had no just cause for separation, as Mrs. Goodwin was a faithful wife and made a home that would be a paradise for any half-way decent man. Finally he hit upon the expedient of sending his wife back to Illinois on a visit to her friends, and by one pretext and another persuaded her to remain away from home for more than a year. Here was his opportunity. Goodwin filed a bill for divorce on the plea of the continued and willful absence of his wife and succeeded in getting a decree in his favor. The people of the town were outraged at the rascality Goodwin had practiced toward his wife, so a few of the prominent men went to work and prepared charges against him and forwarded them to the Postmaster-General, and one day soon after Goodwin was surprised to see his ex-wife walk into the post-office with a commission as postmistress in her pocket and a notice for him to turn over the office and property to her. Mrs. Goodwin still holds the office and has made an excellent postmistress. The business men of the town have faithfully sustained her. Goodwin married again and owns a small store. No one respects either him or his new wife.

From the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index:
GOODWIN, JOHN W.   DALTON, JENNIE   06/11/1861   WILL COUNTY   

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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November 2, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The members of Seward Nelson Post, G.A.R., at Wapella, have engaged John January, the soldier who lost both of his feet in the Andersonville prison, to relate his experiences of the war in the M. E. Church, Wapella, on next Friday evening, November 9. The Clinton Glee Club is expected to be present to sing during the evening. Admission, twenty-five cents. Mr. January has lectured in Clinton, and we can promise the Wapella people that they will hear from him some of the most thrilling incidents of the war.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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November 16, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Quite a number of the members of Frank Lowry Post went to Wapella last Friday night to hear John W. January's lecture for the benefit of Seward Nelson Post. The Clinton Glee Club also went and sang some very fine selections. The lecture and the singing were excellent, and the Wapella people were delighted with the entertainment.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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November 23, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. COLWELL have come back from Nebraska to visit their sons and their legion of old friends. The old gentleman called on THE PUBLIC yesterday afternoon, and he looks as if the wild western air agreed with him. Mr. and Mrs. Colwell are on their way to Florida, where they intend to spend the winter. The old gentleman sensibly concludes to enjoy the competence he made during his earlier life.

Submitted by Judy Simpson

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