NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS - 1882

January 6, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Mrs. E. GORMAN was visiting in Bloomington last Sunday.

Miss Lucy EGBERT, of Tonica, is visiting friends in Clinton.

Miss Cora PHARES returned to school at Bloomington last Tuesday.

Mr. F. M. MILLER, of Amboy, spent the new year holidays in this city with his brother, Mr. James MILLER.

Mr. A. ARGO sold a hog to Mr. James DeLAND this week that weighed 635 pounds. The porker was only eighteen months old. Can someone beat it?

The cheerful face of our old-time townsman, Harry CHAPPELEAR, beamed on us this morning. He was just from Clinton, Mo., and was en route to attend to some business matters in Farmer City. Harry reports that he is doing a successful business in Clinton, and he likes the town and the people. Al HAYNIE is also located in the same town and is building up a good law practice.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 6, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

NEW YEAR'S CALLS.

On last Saturday afternoon and evening Mrs. J. T. SNELL, assisted by a number of young ladies, opened her home for the reception of New Year’s callers. The parlors and the dining room were beautified with vases of hot-house flowers, and the table was spread with all the luxuries that only wealth can command. A large number of gentlemen availed themselves of the privilege of calling on the hostess and her young friends. In the evening Prof. RICHEY’s violin and Mrs. LISENBY’s piano accompaniments furnished delightful music, and the young people took advantage of it to dance the old year out.

On Monday afternoon and evening the South-End Cooking Club received at the home of Mrs. John WARNER. Here was spread a feast that would tempt even a vegetarian to depart from his vow. The ladies of the club have established their reputation in the past for cooking, and they more than sustained themselves on last Monday. The callers were numerous from early in the afternoon till late in the evening, and as a fitting close to the day the young people were invited to enjoy music and dancing.

A number of calls were made at houses during the day where no preparations had been made to entertain, yet the ladies enjoyed the visits of their friends and expressed a determination to keep open house next year. The good old-fashioned custom of New Year’s calls seems to have gone out of fashion of late years, but we hope to see it revived next year.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 6, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

LUCKY PENSIONERS.

Thomas E. SMITH, street commissioner of this city, received a substantial new year’s gift from Uncle Sam this week, being a draft on the United States treasury for $1244.60. Tom was a member of Co. F, Forty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Twice was he afflicted while in the service. He had a siege of the small-pox from which he lost the sight of his right eye; and then he broke his ankle while climbing a fence when his regiment was making an attack on the enemy. He has never fully recovered the use of his foot. Tom might have been placed on the pension rolls years ago, but like a great many other brave fellows he thought he would battle his own way through life without calling upon the government for what he was justly entitled to. Finally he concluded to make application, and he has been awarded a pension of $6 a month from the date of his discharge. Mr. S. K. CARTER deserves credit for getting Tom Smith’s pension.

James GIBSON, of Creek township, will receive to-day an official envelope from the pension department, containing a draft for over $900, to cover arrearages of pension to date. Hereafter he will draw $4 a month from the government. Mr. Gibson was also a member of the Forty-first Illinois, Co. C.

Peter SELLERS, of Weldon, the other day received a government draft for over $1300, to cover arrearages of pension. After this he will draw $8 a month. As Peter wants to get a good wife he can now present a tempting offer to some woman.

Tom BYERLY has been drawing $2 a month for a wound received when he was a member of E. Co., Twentieth Illinois. This week he received the good news that Uncle Sam had doubled his allowance, and henceforth Tom will get $4 a month.

John CURL, of Harp township, also is rejoicing over the news that the government has raised his pension from $6 to $8 per month. It is but a few months ago that he received $1200 or $1400 back pension.

The new year opens favorably for the DeWitt county braves, and they all feel grateful to Steve Carter for his success in managing their cases.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 6, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On Christmas day, a gray-bearded, weather-beaten looking old fellow arrived in Clinton, proclaiming himself to be King Solomon. The marshal locked him up in the station-house for a couple of days to keep him from doing harm, but after consultation with mayor GRAHAM it was decided to release him and get him to leave town. The old fellow was glad enough to have his liberty, but concluded that he would stay in Clinton awhile. He went around town and begged provisions, which were readily given him, for his actions made the ladies anxious to get rid of him as quickly as possible. Some scraps of paper which the marshal found in the King’s pocket led to the conclusion that he was an escaped lunatic from the Kankakee asylum, and the marshal corresponded with the superintendent and received a dispatch to hold the King till an officer of the asylum could come for him. Wednesday night he was taken back to Kankakee. It seems that the poor old man has been insane for some time and that his name is Christian AUGSBURG.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 6, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

REMOVAL OF A TUMOR.

For several years the wife of Rev. J. C. RUCKER has been afflicted with a dropsical tumor, which during the past few months has grown more dangerous, and requiring frequent surgical operations. It finally got to be a question of life or death. Her attending physician decided that her death was a question of short time unless it could be averted by the removal of the tumor. Excepting this local trouble Mrs. Rucker has been blessed with good health, and her physician believed that by an operation her life could be prolonged. Under these circumstances Mrs. Rucker took the heroic view of the case, and consented to run the risk. To leave the tumor was certain death; to remove it might prolong her life. Yesterday she passed through the critical ordeal. The operation was performed by Dr. LUDLUM, Professor of Surgery in the Hahnneman Medical College of Chicago, assisted by Dr. EDWARD, of Augusta, Ky., Dr. DOWNEY, of this city, and Dr. McINTYRE, of Kenney. Mrs. Rucker was placed under the influence of anesthetics, and while in this condition a tumor weighing forty pounds was removed. The sack, after its contents were discharged, weighed twelve pounds. Mrs. Rucker has borne up bravely since the operation, and this morning she is feeling quite easy. Should she safely pass the attendant dangers of inflammation, all will be well.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 13, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Gus KATZ is in Cincinnati visiting friends and buying goods.

Wm. STOKER returned home from Chicago Wednesday evening.

Mrs. M. L. WOY and Mrs. G. W. SCOTT are visiting in Bloomington.

Mrs. A. B. HULL is confined to her bed by a severe attack of sickness.

Oscar WOODWARD has gone east to buy his spring and summer stock of boots and shoes.

Mr. and Mrs. W. B. HALL have gone to Montgomery County, Ind., on a visit to friends.

Miss Anna WOOD returned to her school in Farmer City last Monday, after a two weeks vacation.

Mr. BOGARDUS, of St. Catherines, Canada, is in the city visiting his brother, Mr. Henry BOGARDUS.

The firm of PHARES & DAVIDSON have dissolved partnership, Arthur PHARES continuing the business.

Henry and William MYERS shipped twelve cars of fat hogs from DeWitt to Chicago this week.

Mrs. Lizzie CORDER and her daughter Birdie, of Delavan, are the guests of Mrs. Henry RENNICK this week.

Mr. J. A. WILSON, county treasurer, was in Chicago this week buying a new engine for his tile works at DeWitt.

Messrs. R. A. LEMON, W. FULLER, and Major WARNER were in Springfield this week attending to supreme court business.

KENT & Co. are compelled to greatly enlarge their corn cribs at Wapella. This week four hundred more feet are being added.

The weather the past week has been damp and disagreeable, and the rain has made the roads in the country next to impassable.

The offerings of grain have been light this week on account of the bad condition of the roads. The quotations are: Corn, 53@57c.; oats, 40@42c.; rye, 95@$1; wheat, $1.25.

Mr. Wesley LEAVITT lost a valuable horse on Wednesday night. The animal was taken sick with lung fever during the day and lived but a few hours. The horse was worth $125.

Dr. HUNT received a dispatch from Los Angeles, yesterday morning, announcing that his youngest son (Harry) was dangerously sick and that his life was despaired of. Mrs. HUNT started last night for California.

[see obituary]

Mr. W. B. RUNDLE has taken his son Albert into partnership with him in the butchering business. Albert is a faithful and industrious young man, and his father rightly appreciates his worth by giving him an interest in the business.

P. N. WILLIAMS sued the city this morning for the sum of $35, being the amount he claims is due him for making a special assessment for the use of the city. The case was tried before Justice McHENRY, and the decision reserved till tomorrow.

Mrs. J. C. RUCKER is doing remarkably well since undergoing the severe surgical operation of last week. Her brother, Dr. Rufus HOWARD, remains her constant medical attendant, and watches every symptom closely. There is hope of Mrs. Rucker’s perfect restoration to health.

[see RUCKER obituary]

S. J. D. BLAKE was arrested this week by United States Marshal DAVIS and taken to Springfield, to answer to the charge of selling liquor in violation of the internal revenue law. One or two witnesses were examined, but as no proof could be established, Mr. Blake was discharged.

Hick MILLS is going to have another shooting match. It will occur on Saturday, January 21, to which every body is cordially invited. A beef and turkeys will be put up, and rifles and shot guns will be used on the occasion. Hick never does things by halves, therefore a general good time is anticipated. Don’t forget the date.

Mr. John T. CARLE, circuit clerk, gladdened the hearts of his host of friends yesterday by putting in an appearance at his office. Seventy days ago, yesterday, Mr. Carle went home sick with typhoid fever, and during all these long weary days and weeks he was confined to his bed. At times it was feared that he could not recover. His reappearance up town is almost a resurrection from the dead.

Ed HURD, the young man who swore falsely as to the age of his wife, has been indicted by the grand jury of Macon county for perjury. Mrs. Lucy PORTER, the mother of the bride, and Mayor GRAHAM were subpoenaed to attend court at Decatur today as witnesses against Hurd. It is unfortunate that this family trouble has to get into the courts. Much better had the girl been allowed to live with her husband.

On last Friday, a very pleasant social affair occurred at the residence of Mr. John WIGHTWICK. It was the occasion of Mr. Wightwick’s fifty-fifth birthday, and to stamp the fact indelibly upon his mind his wife invited in a few intimate friends to partake of a most delicious repast prepared for that purpose.

Newt MOFFET, of Waynesville, while driving a calf was thrown from his horse, and his left arm, between the wrist and elbow, was broken. He had a saddle on the horse, but it was not secured by a girth. The saddle slipped off and so did MATTHEWS. He rode to town that night, over two miles, and had his arm set. Matthews is the man who caused the arrest of the late Mr. CUNNINGHAM.

Note: The writer changed the name from Moffet to Matthews.

The new grocery man, Mr. WALL, who conducts the establishment beneath THE PUBLIC office, is determined to build up an extensive business in this county, and if quantity and quality of goods is anything to judge from, he will most assuredly succeed, for his store is crammed full of choice groceries. George FRAMBERS, the accommodating clerk, will always be found behind the counter, assisting Mr. Wall in supplying the wants of customers.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 13, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The farm of the late Elijah HULL, one mile south of Waynesville, consisting of one hundred and seventy acres, is offered for sale, eighty acres of which will be sold at administrator’s sale on Tuesday, January 24th, at two o’clock p.m. The balance of the farm will be sold at private sale by the heirs of the deceased. It is a valuable piece of property.

January 13, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A. H. IVES, this week, advertises the sale of his personal property, which includes 9 work horses, a Norman stallion, 5 young horses and colts, 4 cows, a yearling bull, 3 young steers, 2 heifer calves, 50 sheep, 18 shoats, and a general assortment of first-class farming implements. The sale will be on next Thursday, at the old Butterworth homestead, near Wapella.

Dave BOSSERMAN is going west next month, and he offers all his personal property at public sale on Tuesday, February 7. There are 7 horses, a mule, 6 cows, 10 heifers, 1 bull, 9 calves, 30 stock hogs, 15 fat hogs, corn, hay, and a fine lot of agricultural implements.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 13, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

About three o’clock last Sunday morning Mr. and Mrs. Wm. BISHOP were awakened by hearing a noise in their bedroom, and thinking it was one of the children Mr. Bishop asked what was the matter. Receiving no answer he sprang out of bed but not in time to get a view of his visitor. The burglar had effected an entrance through the middle window in the sitting room, the sash of which was not locked. He secured Mr. Bishop’s clothes from the bedside and carried them out into the yard. There was nothing in the pockets save a penknife, as Mr. Bishop had removed some small change from his pocket before retiring. A lamp was burning brightly in the sitting room, so that the thief had a fair view of the surroundings, but fortunately he missed the valuables. The thief made his exit by the same way he entered, the door being fastened with a patent lock which he could not open. Mr. Bishop followed him out into the yard, but saw only a man jumping over the fence into the alley. The next morning Mr. Bishop’s clothes were found in the yard, even the knife being left in the pocket. The thief was so closely pursued that it is probable he did not take time to examine the pockets. This is not the first time that Mr. Bishop has been visited by burglars, and at each time they stole his clothes. Thieves make a mistake if they expect to find money in Clinton houses, for every sensible man keeps his money in one of the banks.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 13, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

JUDGE DAVIS IS IN ERROR.
Wyant, the Murderer of Rusk, was not Insane, nor did he Die a Maniac.

Washington, D.C., January 9.—Referring to the GUITEAU trial and to the opinion of Dr. Andrew McFARLAND, of Illinois, that Guiteau is insane, Senator David DAVIS relates the following interesting facts as showing great liability to misjudge as to the mental condition of men on trial for a crime and alleged to be insane, and on the reliability of the judgment of Dr. McFarland as an expert in such cases. The Senator says that while he occupied the bench in the Bloomington circuit, a man under indictment for murder was tried before him. In this case the killing was admitted, and insanity was the plea of the defense. Abraham LINCOLN and Leonard SWETT, the two most distinguished lawyers in Central Illinois, appeared in the case, Lincoln for the prosecution and Swett for the defense. The large preponderance of the testimony of experts favored the sanity of the prisoner. Dr. McFarland stood almost alone in the opposite view of the case. His testimony was decided and emphatic, that the accused was insane. After hearing all the evidence in the case, listening to arguments of distinguished counsel, and observing closely the appearance and behavior of the prisoner during the protracted trial, Senator Davis says he became convinced that the accused was sane, and that Dr. McFarland had erred in his diagnosis.

The jury, however, returned a verdict of, "Not guilty." Immediately after the acquittal of the accused, he was committed to an insane asylum, when the fact soon became unmistakably apparent that he was insane, and in a short time afterwards he died a maniac.

"The sequel showed," said Judge Davis, "that Dr. McFarland, in his testimony as to the insanity of the man, was correct, and I was wrong in my conclusion that he was sane."

The case which Judge Davis cites is a matter of history in this county, but the Judge is in error when he says that the murderer died a maniac. He lived for years afterward, and was as full of the devil as when he sneakily slew his victim. The points in the case are these: Somewhere about twenty-seven years ago Isaac WYANT and Anson RUSK lived neighbors in DeWitt township. For months there had been a neighborhood quarrel in which the two men named were regarded as leaders of the two factions. One day Wyant and Rusk met in the village of Marion, where hostilities were renewed. Words brought on blows, and in the fight Wyant drew a knife on his opponent. Rusk was on the alert and promptly drew a pistol and fired, the ball taking effect in Wyant’s arm. The wound was dangerous, and to save Wyant’s life his arm had to be amputated. Dr. LEMON, assisted by Drs. GOODBRAKE and WARNER, performed the operation. While the doctors were at work, Dr. Goodbrake made the remark to Dr. Warner that it was "a d---d pity the ball didn’t go through Wyant’s head instead of his arm." For this Wyant never forgave Dr. Goodbrake, and on several occasions afterward he attempted to take the doctor’s life.

Some time after Wyant recovered from his wound, he and Rusk happened in Clinton on the same day. Rusk was standing by the stove in the county clerk’s office in the court-house when Wyant cautiously opened the door and fired at him. The ball took effect and Rusk fell to his knees. Wyant fired again with fatal aim and, when his victim was laying on the floor bleeding to death, he rushed in and fired a third shot. The shots were fired in such rapid succession that all was over before those in the office could recover from the panic into which they were thrown. People on the square heard the shots and ran toward the court-house to learn the cause. Wyant stood in front of the court-house waiving his revolver and threatening death to anyone who would approach him. Judge McGRAW, who was then county clerk, ran from his office to find a doctor, and meeting Dr. Goodbrake he told him what had happened. Surgical aid was of no avail, for poor Rusk died within a few moments.

Wyant was arrested and was taken to Bloomington for trial. Abraham Lincoln appeared for the prosecution, and Leonard Swett was attorney for the defense. The killing was admitted and the defense set up the plea of insanity. Wyant’s personal friends, of course, swore to his insanity, but the preponderance of the evidence went to show that he was a vicious and dangerous man, and that the murder was premeditated, for Wyant had sworn to be revenged on Rusk for the loss of his arm. Drs. McFarland and Roe were the only experts who swore that Wyant was really insane. The other physicians did not agree with them. One reason Dr. McFarland gave for his belief in the insanity of the prisoner was that he was continually pulling at his hair during the trial. When Dr. Goodbrake was put upon the stand he raised the laugh at Dr. McFarland’s expense by saying that if pulling at the hair was a sign of insanity, then Dr. McFarland must be insane, for during the time he was on the stand he was continually pulling out his own hair. Dr. McFarland had been afflicted with some disease which loosened his hair, and by force of habit he was engaged while giving testimony in pulling the loose hair from his head. The jury rendered the verdict on McFarland’s testimony, as he was then considered [a] great authority on insanity. Wyant was acquitted and sent to an insane asylum, but was shortly after discharged. He remained in this county for some time, but was finally compelled to sell out and move away.

Judge Davis was certainly in error when he gave the opinion, above quoted, for Wyant did not die a maniac soon after the trial. On the contrary, he lived a long time in this county after he was acquitted of the murder.

Some three or four years ago he came back to this county on a visit, and the probabilities are that he is alive and well. It is said that while he was in the insane asylum he killed one of the inmates of that institution with whom he had some personal difficulty.

(more)

January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The man, WYANT, of whom we gave an account last week as the murderer of Anson RUSK, was found dead a few years ago in a brush heap on a farm in Indiana, with a bullet-hole in his head. This will certainly settle the question that was raised by Judge DAVIS that he died a maniac in the asylum at Jacksonville.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

TURNER’s store, at Wapella, was burglarized the other night, and a valuable lot of goods was carried off.

The Clinton Musical Union met at the residence of Mrs. KNEADLER last Monday evening, and enjoyed another of their splendid musical treats.

Mr. J. E. DOWNING, of Wapella, is having a bad run of luck just now. He lost all of his fat hogs by cholera, and this week he had a fine mare ruined by the loss of her hoof.

Dan C. WRIGHT, of Varna, Ill., who attended school in this city two years ago and made his home at Ald. McFARLAND’s is to be married to a young lady living at Varna on next Thursday.

In the telegraphic dispatches from the State Board of Health at Springfield is the report of a case of varioloid in Clinton. This is not correct. The sick man lives nearly five miles from this city, in Harp township.

DONAVIN’s Tennesseeans sang to a large audience in the M. E. Church, on Wednesday evening. This troupe of colored vocalists can always count on a full house in Clinton. Bro. WASHINGTON, the "shouting tenor," is immense as a leader of revival singing.

The Emma ABBOTT opera company will perform the opera of the "Bohemian Girl," in Decatur, one week from tomorrow. Jake HAND has secured about thirty choice seats for those who want to go from this city. If that number goes, a special train will leave Decatur for Clinton after the performance.

Old Frank and young Frank HOLZER of Farmer City and DeWitt, have been violating the internal revenue law, by selling liquor without government license. They were arraigned before the United States court at Springfield last week, where they plead guilty. The fines and costs amounted to $800, which they had to pay or go to jail. They settled.

Mr. W. L. GLESSNER’s lines must have fallen in pleasant places in his new home in Americus, Ga. We see by a late copy of his paper (the Recorder) that it has been made the official organ of the city. Bro. Glessner is making a good newspaper, throwing into it some of the life and vim of the Northern news-gatherer.

The city council has been discussing the necessity of requiring of the owner of DeWitt Hall that he provide some other outlet from the hall than the present narrow stairway. Should a panic arise at any time when the hall is full of people there would necessarily be loss of life. Mr. RENNICK could add to the security of the hall by putting a stairway down from the rear end of this building. Of course, there is no possibility of enlarging the front entrance.

A mare belonging to Mr. James DOWNING lost her hoof the other day while going from Clinton to Wapella. The mare’s foot caught fast in a frozen rut in the road, and in her effort to pull it out, she tore the hoof off. She was worth about $100. The probabilities are that she will be unfit for use for a long time, if she ever gets a new hoof. Another Wapellican had his mule’s foot caught in a rut. He went to a house close by, borrowed an ax, and chopped away the frozen ground, and thus released the mule.

Mr. B. F. PUTNAM offers eighty acres of land for sale near Wapella. A good bargain can be had. Read advertisement. [Advertisement: FARM FOR SALE.—About eighty-two acres of land, 70 of which is prairie and 12 of timber, two miles west of Wapella, being a part of the Mitchell HARROLD estate, will be sold. There are two small houses on the land, one barn, good wells, &c. The property is in good condition. Will be sold cheap for cash if applied for at once. Apply on the premises.  B. R. PUTNAM]

Mr. John T. CARLE has so far recovered from his long and weary sickness that he is now able to attend to his duties in the circuit clerk’s office.

The Central reservoir at the machine shops has about ten inches of ice as a covering to keep the water warm. This year the boys will not be allowed to skate upon the lake, and thus ARGO Bros. will be enabled to put up the best quality of ice.

Mrs. Rebecca BARNETT, wife of Alvin BARNETT, died at Taylorville last Sunday, aged seventy-five years. Mrs. Barnett will be remembered by all of the old residents as the landlady of the old Barnett House, which place she filled for over twenty-four years. In the olden time the Barnett House was one of the most popular hotels in Central Illinois, and a quarter of a century ago all the noted men of the State who had occasion to visit Clinton made this hotel their home.

On Monday night of this week, burglars made a raid on Mrs. Fred HANGER’s residence in the Third Ward and stole $16 in cash from one of her sons. The thieves left the clothing out in the yard where it was found next morning. The same night burglars tried to get into ex-alderman WOLF’s house, but were unsuccessful, as Mr. W. heard their racket and scared them away. Attempts have been made at several other places during the week, therefore secure your doors and windows at night.

Good Deacon LISENBY, of Weldon, is in the toils of disease. During the last flurry of snow that fell in this county, he over-exerted himself shoveling snow. As he has but one arm with which to help himself, the labor was too much for him. This brought on a severe attack of erysipelas in his arm, and early last week he was compelled to take to his bed. For days he was in a very precarious condition, but yesterday morning Dr. GOODBRAKE, who is attending him, brought to Clinton the glad news that the Deacon has a fair chance for recovery.

Note: This was Charles S. Lisenby.

The sensation relative to vaccination in Clinton has assumed a wondrous growth during the past few weeks, until it has become difficult to find a person that has not encountered the peculiar and aggravating affect of this bovine extract for the prevention of that dangerous malady called small-pox. "A fellow-feeling makes us wondrous kind," and so it is that each and all of us have educated ourselves against being particularly affectionate toward each other, especially in the region of the left arm. We think the dreaded scourge would have an interesting time searching for a victim in the city of Clinton.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

STOP THAT, GLESSNER!

Now that you have made your home in the sunny South, we must enter our protest against your trying to persuade good Republican farmers to leave this county and settle down there. Of course it is natural that you should try to populate your county with first-class farmers, but what Republican wants to leave the grand old prairie State, where his vote will count something, and settle in a Southern State where he will become a political cipher? We have no objection to your trying your persuasive arts on Democrats, but hands off of our Republicans. We can not spare any of them from this county; it is too confounded close now, politically, to be comfortable.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The board of directors of one of the district schools near this city refused to obey the order in regard to having the scholars vaccinated, and rather than obey a humane law they discharged the teacher and closed the school. It does seem strange in these enlightened days that any number of men can be found to array themselves against one of the most positive of medical facts. Past history proves that vaccination is almost a sure safeguard against small-pox. One of the leading physicians in this city, who was a surgeon in the army, says that small-pox was slaying its victims, right and left, till a general order was issued that every soldier be vaccinated. After that was done the disease almost entirely disappeared, and those who were attacked had but the lightest form of varioloid. The experience of the leading physicians of the world all leads to the one conclusion that vaccination is the only remedy, and a sure one, against the contagion. The people of this county have generally obeyed the law, and in this city but few children attending school have not been vaccinated. Now that there is a case of varioloid in the county we would again urge the importance of vaccination. What parent would ever forgive themselves if they should lose a child by small-pox through neglecting this precautionary measure. Life and health are too precious to be frittered away because of some unfounded objections against vaccination.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The city council does not seem favorable to Jake HAND’s enterprise in furnishing first-class entertainments. The council charged him $7.50 license for the DONAVIN Tennesseeans last Wednesday night, while snide shows have paid less than one-half that amount for the privilege of boring an audience. Council should charge a reasonable license to all companies, and, if possible, give Mr. Hand a little discount when the money has to come out of his pocket. It has been the custom for several years for the council to charge about $3 in cash, and in addition require eight or ten complimentary tickets. This demand was made upon Mr. Hand, but he declined to accede to the terms. Every complimentary ticket he would give represented its value in cash, for he received but a small percentage on the gross receipts of the concert for his labor and trouble. He paid the $7.50 in cash. He does not think the council has dealt liberally with him.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

SWALLOWING THE LYE.

Presley OWENS’ son, aged about ten years, went into WHEELER & Co.’s drug store with his mother on Tuesday afternoon, and while there the boy went back to a sink and picked up a sixteen ounce graduate, which was partially filled with lye, and took a swallow of its contents. Mr. WHEELER’s attention was attracted to the boy by his strangling efforts to breathe, and as soon as he had learned what he had done he gave him a large dose of oil to counteract the effects of the alkali. The boy vomited up the oil and lye and thus save his life. When he left town in the afternoon his throat and mouth were very sore. This will teach the boy a lesson in the future about handling things in a drug store. Evidently he wanted a drink of water, but seeing the graduate concluded to drink from that instead of using a glass that was alongside the water bucket.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Dick WEEDMAN was in Bloomington last Tuesday, and while walking along the street he was stricken with an attack of neuralgia of the heart, when he fell senseless to the sidewalk. Kind hands removed him to an office near by, where he had the benefit of the best medical attendance. For a time he was considered to be in a dangerous condition, and his brother, Sheriff WEEDMAN, received a dispatch calling him immediately to Bloomington. As there was no train going north till evening, the sheriff had to wait for it, but before the hour he received another telegram that Dick was much better. Colonel WEEDMAN was also sent for, and he was fortunately able to make a train that was nearly due at Farmer City, and got to Bloomington. He brought Dick home to Parnell on Wednesday morning. Dick is still very weak, but hopes are entertained of his recovery. Once before, Dick had a similar attack. One morning while sitting at the breakfast table at his home, he fell to the floor in an unconscious state. He felt the effects of it some time after.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

PRECAUTIONS AGAINST DANGER.

In this State small-pox has made its appearance in thirty-five counties, and nearly ninety townships are reported to the State Board of Health as having the loathsome disease. It is therefore the part of good judgment for every town and city to be prepared for its coming, for no one can tell the day or hour that some stranger may bring the seeds of the disease with him from some infested locality. The supervisor, clerk and assessor, forming the town board of Clintonia township, met last Monday night with the city council for the purpose of uniting on some plan to take care of any who may unfortunately be stricken with the terrible disease. A committee of conference was appointed by council, and the joint committee afterward met and talked over what was best to be done in the premises. It was finally agreed to build a pest-house in the west end of Woodlawn cemetery, and have it furnished ready for use in case occasion requires it. This building will be so thoroughly isolated that there will be no danger of infection from it. All proper care will be exercised by the city authorities to guard against the approach of the dread evil.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE DREAD VISITOR IS AT THE THRESHOLD OF THIS CITY.

Jonathan N. YOUNG, a farm hand who lived in Harp township, went to Indiana on a visit and returned here last Thursday. He went out to Mr. Jasper HARP’s house, between four and five miles from this city, that same evening and complained of not feeling well. The next morning a physician was summoned, and his practical eye at once detected that Young was suffering from either a premonitory attack of measles or small-pox. To guard against the possibility of danger, the doctor recommended that the patient be put into a vacant house that was near the farm, and be kept there till the disease should pronounce itself. As Young was not so sick but that he could help himself, it was not thought necessary by himself or the doctor to provide him with a nurse. Arrangements were made to supply him with food and fuel, and Young took up his abode in the vacant house. Everything was provided for his comfort that was necessary. The news, of course, spread rapidly, and it was unnecessary to place a guard on the premises to keep away visitors. On Sunday the disease had so far developed that the doctor pronounced it a mild case of varioloid. Young thus far has not been confined to his bed, nor is there any probability that he will be. Every precaution has been taken against the spread of the disease, and its timely detection was fortunate.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A freight train on the Central road, coming from the south on Sunday night, was thrown from the track near Ramsey, by the spreading of the rails. At that point new steel rails had recently been laid, and it is thought that they were not sufficiently spiked to the ties. Eight loaded grain cars and the caboose rolled down a steep embankment, causing a general smash-up and scattering the wheat in every direction. Conductor WAMSLEY, of this city, was in the caboose. He was badly bruised, but fortunately escaped serious injury.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

PERSONAL.

Mr. Frank McKINNEY has returned to Clinton Wednesday from Colorado.

There was a social party at the residence of Dr. DOWNEY last Friday evening.

Geo. ARMSTRONG, Jr., became the father of a promising boy on Wednesday of last week.

Miss Fannie GOLDSMITH, of Aurora, Ill., sister of Mrs. S. FREUDENSTEIN, is visiting in Clinton.

Misses Mame and Hattie MAGILL who went to Iowa a couple of weeks ago arrived at home yesterday.

S. K. CARTER goes to Decatur today to attend to some important cases now pending in the Macon circuit court.

Willis HORN and Miss Libbie GAMBREL, daughter of Mr. William GAMBREL, were married on Thursday evening of last week.

Mr. James CONKLIN enjoyed the society of Chicago insurance men this week in the city by the turbid waters of Lake Michigan.

Mrs. B. F. HENRY, of Tunbridge, has been very sick for the past three weeks, but we are glad to announce that a change for the better has taken place.

Mr. William MAGILL, Jr., and his young bride arrived in Clinton yesterday morning, and will make this city their future home. Clinton welcomes the fair bride.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 20, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On Wednesday, the 15th of February, Mr. Jacob ZIEGLER will have a public sale at his farm, six miles southeast of Clinton. The sale will include horses, mules, cows, cattle, sheep, hogs, farming implements, and some household furniture. Mr. Ziegler intends to move to his new farm, near this city, and not having sufficient land to feed the stock he now owns, he proposes to largely reduce the number of his stock.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 27, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Theo. D. EDMISTON, of Weldon, was seized with an epileptic fit at the depot in this city last Wednesday afternoon, just after getting off the train. He had been to Farmer City attending the funeral of C. S. LISENBY. Fortunately, Mr. W. FULLER was standing near Theo. and caught him before he fell. The attack lasted but a short time and Mr. Edmiston was able to go to his home in Weldon on the evening train.

Note: aka D. T. Edmiston [see obituary]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 3, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

PERSONAL.

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. HUTCHIN, of Decatur, are visiting relatives in Clinton this week.

Mrs. Lucy E. PORTER, who has been very sick for the past week or two, is recovering.

Mr. George DAVIDSON, of Champaign, brother of Mr. Frank C. DAVIDSON, is in the city buying horses to ship to Dakota Territory.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 3, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. John T. CARLE, circuit clerk of this county, and his family have had their share of sorrow and affliction. A little more than a year ago his eldest daughter, Allie, died of consumption. For months she had lingered alternately between hope and fear, but Death at last claimed his prize. The second daughter, May, was frail of body, but her friends fondly hoped that with increasing years she would outgrow her consumptive tendencies. During the school years of 1880-81 she was a prominent teacher in the Farmer City public schools, where she was generally beloved by her scholars and had the full confidence of the parents and board of directors. Last summer she was elected as one of the teachers of the public schools in this city, but when September came her father feared that she was not equal to the work, so her resignation was tendered. A short time afterwards the truth struck home to the hearts of her fond parents that her time in this life was near the end. During the long weeks of her confinement to bed she was yet hopeful, but toward the last she began to realize that her young life was fast passing away. On last Sunday night she died, and on Tuesday afternoon her body was laid in Woodlawn cemetery beside the sister whom she loved so dearly.

To add to Mr. Carle’s affliction he was confined to his bed for more than seventy days with typhoid fever. His daughter May occupied the adjoining room to his. The stricken father had not only his own disease to contend with, but the consciousness of his daughter’s condition tended to his discouragement and gloom, and this no doubt retarded his progress to health. Mr. and Mrs. Carle have the heartfelt sympathy of the whole community in their sorrow and affliction.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 10, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CURRENT TOPICS.

Miss Kate FORD is visiting relatives in Cincinnati.

Mrs. F. C. DAVIDSON has been very sick for the past week.

Miss Hattie PORTER returned home from Nebraska yesterday afternoon.

Mrs. C. L. DOWNEY, of Atlanta, is visiting at the residence of Dr. DOWNEY.

Mrs. S. P. WALDO, of Colfax, Ill., was in Clinton this week and called at THE PUBLIC office.

The young friends of Miss Leila VanLUE gave her a surprise party last Saturday evening. The little folks enjoyed a royal time.

Next Tuesday is St. Valentine’s day. A large number of elegant pictures with tender poetry are visible in the story windows.

Charley STOKER is dangerously sick with lung fever. Don O’DONALD has also been confined to the house by sickness for the past week.

If you want to see something quite too consummately superb, and too utterly beautiful, call and see MILLER’s new curtain nets and lambrequins.

The Fireman’s ball takes place in DeWitt Hall this evening. It is hoped that the citizens of Clinton will give the ball a liberal patronage, especially those who have property to protect from fire.

Fears are entertained in Clinton that there will be a new band organized in our midst before long. Some of the boys who have no regard for the peace and happiness of our people are the originators of this infamous scheme.

Chester JONES made his first appearance on the streets last Saturday, after his long and serious illness. Ches. made a heroic struggle against the grim destroyer, and his friends will be pleased to learn that he has come out victorious.

We understand that A. W. FLEMING, of Gettysburg, Pa., well-known among the boys of Clinton, has been admitted to the bar to practice law in that State, and will immediately hang out his shingle in one of the suburban towns of the above named city.

The Illinois State Board of Health has sent two hundred copies of its official order concerning the prevention of small-pox to Mayor GRAHAM for distribution. Mr. Graham has left them at the post-office, where persons wanting to procure a copy can find them.

Mr. A. J. WILLIAMS, living near Weldon, has purchased the corner lot now occupied by HANGER & Co.’s meat market, and intends to erect a large two-story brick building on the same sometime next summer. He also intends to make his residence in Clinton soon.

DeWitt Hall has undergone a number of improvements lately. The capacity of the hall has been increased by the addition of the two rooms in the front of the building, the stage has been enlarged and raised, and a new stairway and doors have been put in the place of the old ones.

The tender passion has been prevalent in this county this winter. During the month of November the county clerk issued marriage licenses for forty-one couples; for the month of December, forty; for the month of January, twenty-eight; and during the present month, up to date, fourteen. One heartless creature had the hardihood to suggest that the crop of paupers would be unusually large this year. We don’t believe it; we have a better opinion of our young men than that.

Mr. and Mrs. Peter GIDEON, of Lake Minnetonka, Minn., are the guests of Mrs. KIRKLEY, Mrs. Gideon’s sister. Mr. Gideon and family moved from Clinton twenty-five years ago, and this is his first return to his early home. Mr. Gideon lived in Clinton when it was unpopular to be an abolitionist, and he not only fought at the ballot-box for his principles, but it is said that he had to fight more than one Democrat in his day to defend his right to advocate the freedom of the slave.

Last Monday was the anniversary of William M. WEEDMAN's existence—in other words, it was his birthday; and while he was busily engaged in his labors about his livery stable on that day, a number of his relatives gathered at his residence. When the innocent William returned home for his evening repast, he was somewhat surprised to find so many guests present, but he made the best of the matter, considering the soiled condition of his uniform, which corresponded with his avocation. Mr. Weedman became the recipient of a very elegant and handsome bible—an article he had long felt in need of and one that he can appreciate and read.

The alarm of fire was given about two o’clock Tuesday morning, occasioned by smoke issuing from RUNBECK’s clothing store. By going into the store it was found that some goods in one of the drawers was on fire. It is supposed that a lighted cigar had been laid on the shelf above the drawer, and that it had fallen in the drawer, afterward being closed without noticing the burning weed. Clothing on the shelves above the drawer was damaged to the extent of $125. This is the second time within the past two weeks that Union block has had a narrow escape from the fire fiend, and from the same cause; the other blaze being in Mr. WALL’s grocery store, a lighted cigar being dropped in a box containing sawdust.

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. MARKLEY, of Champaign, are visiting Mr. Henry ZIEGLER’s family.

N. F. HUNTER has resigned the office of night watch to accept a similar position at the Central depot.

The many friends in this county of Mr. Sabin TAYLOR, who now resides at Hoopston, will regret to learn that he is dangerously sick from lung fever.

The Rev. J. MacLEAN, formerly pastor of the Presbyterian church in this city, has bought an elegant home in Washington. Judge DAVIS will reside with him.

TWEED & GOODPASTURE’s store and the billiard hall in Weldon were burglarized on Tuesday night. A lot of underwear, cigars, etc., were taken from Tweed & Goodpasture.

Gen. McNULTA and Mr. Linc WELDON of Bloomington, spent a couple of days in Clinton this week. They were here closing up matters connected with the issue of the new Harp bonds.

The Knights of Pythias have abandoned their idea of holding their anniversary reception on Monday evening, the 20th inst., and have decided to observe the occasion on the Sunday previous, the 19th inst., by attending the Presbyterian church in a body in the morning, the Rev. O. B. THAYER having kindly consented to deliver an address appropriate to the occasion. All the members of the order who can make it convenient to attend are earnestly requested to do so.

A Harp township farmer concluded to leave last Sunday night when the neighbors were buried in sleep. He loaded up his goods and got ready for a midnight start. Charles CUNDIFF, the collector of the township, got a hint of the intended removal and at midnight was on hand to collect the taxes. There was no escape, so the man had to pay. One or two businessmen in Clinton will have to charge up their bills to profit and loss.

Luke CRAIG, living about five miles east of Clinton, met with a serious accident last Monday afternoon, while engaged in shelling corn. While standing by the feeder, his feet slipped and he fell, his elbow striking in the feeder and catching against the machinery. The flesh was badly torn from his arm. Dr. Aaron EDMISTON was called, who dressed the wound, and the patient is doing as well as could be expected. The large rod which connects the sheller with the horse power was broken by the sudden jar of the machinery.

The Clinton Musical Union met at Mr. A. M. SACKETT’s residence on last Monday evening and rendered a fine program to a very large audience. The Union is doing excellent work in cultivating the tastes of Clinton to a high order of music, both vocal and instrumental. It would not do to particularize as to the excellence of any one singer or performer on the piano, but here and there throughout the evening it was an extra pleasure to listen to a piece that was being rendered with finer effect. Mr. PEASE deserves great credit for the interest which is manifested by our Clinton musicians in these monthly entertainments.

The road master of the Springfield division of the Central road has been making a survey for the sight of the new depot which is to be located in Harp township, about midway between Clinton and DeWitt. The depot will be on Col. SNELL’s land, in section twenty-one. The Colonel has given a deed for a strip one hundred feet wide and two hundred and ten feet in length. The farmers in that region promise to grade and furnish ties for the side tracks, and they are ready to go to work as soon as orders are received from the Central company. This will be a great convenience to the people of that township and save them from the expense of hauling their crops long distances to market.

Three female members of the colored race indulged in a wordy combat on the streets last Saturday night, in which they endeavored to advertise to the people of Clinton and surrounding country the life, character and personal history of each other. How well they succeeded we are not prepared to say, but it is very evident from their conversation that none of them had characters to be envious of. The city authorities thought their autobiographies were not just the proper subjects to discuss on the streets, and as a result their cases were laid before Justice RICHEY on Monday on a charge of using obscene literature and for boisterous conduct. Each of them was fined $6.90 and costs.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 10, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ALMOST A FATAL ACCIDENT.

Yesterday morning, between eight and nine o’clock, Mr. Cyrus FUNK had a narrow escape from a fearful death. While adjusting the belting on the swift-revolving machinery in his planning mill the skirt of his coat got caught between the belting and the band wheel, and with frightful velocity he was carried around the machinery twice, when he was thrown off to a distance of about ten feet. When he was picked up, every shred of clothing was torn from his body, leaving him entirely naked with the exception of his shoes and stockings. Mr. EATHERTON and John FITZGERALD were at work in the same room with Mr. Funk, and while one went to his assistance the other one ran for a doctor. At first it was supposed that Mr. Funk had been killed, for he was totally unconscious, and the terrible news soon spread throughout the city. Hardly five minutes had elapsed from the time of the accident before a large crowd had gathered at the shop. Dr. GOODBRAKE was speedily found, and by the time he reached there Mr. Funk’s consciousness began to return. A hasty examination by the doctor soon convinced him that no bones had been broken and also that no serious internal injury had taken place. The patient complained of a severe pain at the back of the neck. He was taken to his home as speedily as possible, being warmly wrapped in blankets. Last evening the doctor reported that his patient was doing well, and that the only danger to be apprehended was inflammation from the contusion on the spinal column. Mr. Funk has been working about machinery for over a quarter of a century, and this is the first serious accident he has met.

[see FUNK obituary ]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 10, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

SWINDLED BY A SHARPER.

William LISTER lives in the east end of Harp township. He went to Missouri to invest in some land, taking with him considerable money to make the purchase. Not finding just what he wanted he returned homewards, and a few days ago arrived at Springfield. While waiting for the train to bring him back to DeWitt county he made the acquaintance of a gentleman stranger, who claimed to be a brother-in-law of Frank ROBBINS, postmaster at Kenney. The stranger said he had a package of goods in the Springfield express office which he was anxious to bring with him to Kenney, on which there was $110 charges. He showed Lister a draft for $700 but as it was too late to get it cashed at a bank, he would like to borrow enough money from him to pay for the express package, and when they reached Kenney, Robbins would repay him the money. Generous-hearted Lister was willing to help the friend of any DeWitt county man, and promptly loaned him the money. The fellow was profuse in his thanks and started for the express office to get his package. Lister waited patiently for his return, but it is needless to state that the gentlemanly stranger failed to come back. By-and-by it began to dawn on Lister’s mind that he had been duped, and taking his revolver out of his valise, he started out in search of his friend. He did not find him, and anxious inquiry at the express office revealed the fact that no such man had been there.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 10, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Santa Anna Township went into the railroad business a dozen or more years ago and voted $50,000 to the I. B. & W. road. At the time the vote was taken there was no State law justifying such donations, and the people of Santa Anna took advantage of this a few years later and stopped paying interest. The railroad company sued the township and Judge TIPTON was employed for the defense. The town officers made a contract with the Judge to pay him $3000 for his services if successful, but nothing for a failure. The Judge won the case. The town officers then refused to perform their part of the contract. They had saved $50,000, but were not satisfied. The Judge brought suit in our circuit court and received a judgment for the $3000. The town officers took an appeal to the appellate court, and there again the Judge won the day. Now the best thing for Santa Anna township to do is to make good its contract and stop squandering any more money in litigation. "The laborer is worthy of his hire."

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 10, 1882 
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HONORING THE AGED.

On the 31st of January Mr. Isaac MOORE, father of the Hon C. H. MOORE, was eighty-eight years of age. His friends in Farmer City got up a surprise party to celebrate the day, and among the guests were a number of the old people of that town. The Farmer City Reaper gives an interesting account of the occasion, and in addition a brief sketch of Mr. Moore’s life, which we copy:

Mr. Moore is a very remarkable man in many respects, and we gathered some incidents of his life to make up the following brief sketch:

He was born in Saratoga county, N. Y., Jan. 21st [sic], 1794, and during the first term of George Washington’s administration as President of the United States. At the age of seventeen he went to Ohio, and was married to his first wife when in his 23d year, settled in Geauga county, and turned his attention to farming. By his first wife he was the father of eight children—five sons and three daughters—the oldest of the sons being C. H. Moore, of Clinton, a man who occupies a prominent position in the history of DeWitt county. The second son is A. C. Moore, of Ohio, third Blish Moore, of Harp township, in this county; the fourth is Milam [Milan] Moore, a jeweler of this city, and with whom the father is now living; the fifth is H. C. Moore, a wealthy lumber merchant of Oskaloosa, Iowa. The daughters are all dead. Mr. M. has been married three times—his first wife living fifteen years after her marriage; his second, who had one child, lived thirty years after her marriage; the third lived eighteen years with him, but had no children. He served in the war of "12" when a boy and now draws a pension for that service. He has figured extensively in public life, having been J. P. for fifteen years, and county commissioner for some time. He always voted with the Whig party, and that party elected him in 1847 to represent his county in the State Legislature. Mr. M. descended from revolutionary stock, his father having served seven years in the war of Independence. His first vote was cast for Rufus King, opponent of James Monroe, who was elected.

The great longevity of Mr. Moore is owing to his prudent habits and evenness of temper; he never sued a man and was never sued; he never struck a man in anger and no man ever struck him; no man ever called him a liar and he never called a man a liar in his life; he never was sick a day since he can remember that he could not get around and attend to business, and he is now floating toward the great ocean, and resting in the tranquil shadow of the twilight, waiting the final summons that shall close a useful and well-spent life. Every attention that parental affection can conceive of is given to Mr. M. to make him comfortable in the family of his son.

[see obituary]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 17, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

PETER M. GIDEON.

A day or two since, we had a call from an old acquaintance and fellow-citizen, Peter M. GIDEON, now of Minnesota. We knew him in August, 1841, and time has not dimmed his bright, pleasant, fun-loving eye, nor has age changed the firm-set mouth that even in early life indicated to all a firmness and determination not to be mistaken by even a casual observer. Of such men martyrs were made at an earlier day. He first came to this county in June of 1841, on foot, carrying his knapsack and tools for plastering. Even his method of traveling was new to us. No other person to our knowledge ever adopted it. His load was heavy and he had carried it on foot from Champaign county, Ohio, to Clinton, Ill. He was the pioneer of all the emigrants from Champaign, Madison and other counties in Ohio to this part of Illinois. In traveling long distances on foot, when heavily laden, in addition to his feet he used two nicely made canes of hickory, about as long as he was tall, with a round handle on each at the top. After his "plunder" was tied on his back and shoulders and he had bid all "good-bye," the last thing he did was to take one of these canes or sticks in each hand and start off really on four legs, although he had but two, the two canes with his arms making the same number of steps with his feet. He said it was much easier to carry a load in that manner and it made his arms do their part of the labor. Everybody looked at him on the road, and until he was near enough so that his two sticks could be seen, the motion of his arms and his body bent so far forward caused many a momentary doubt as to just what order of mammals he belonged. He enjoyed the attention his appearance attracted.

Always an ardent and fearless abolitionist, no poor fugitive from slavery passed through this part of Illinois without his knowledge and helping hand. When he came to Illinois the great majority of the settlers in the county were from the Southern States, mostly from Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia, and a few owned slaves hired out in those States. It took a man of great personal courage and strong convictions to stand up under the odium and unpopularity of his views. He was an honest and faithful workman at his trade, but ever ready to discuss the rights of the Negro and the wrongs of slavery. He was honest in his views, firm and courageous in expressing them, and fighting for them if necessary. He won the respect of even his most bitter opponents, and by common consent he was soon allowed by those who knew him best to give his views without much controversy, and we presume he now thinks it was the old abolitionists that freed the slaves.

To his political creed he added a belief in the doctrine of universal salvation of all mankind and a total abstinence from all that intoxicates. These were mortal sins in that day with most people. We have seen Clinton at times when there was not a yard of calico or a sack of coffee to be bought in the place, but it never was without whisky even in those early days.

In a year or two his religious belief made his neighbors more trouble than his political opinions. It worried some of them that as good a man as he could not see that it was right to punish a man in the next life because he had made a mistake and had a few drops of water put on his heard instead of being "buried in baptism," or because he could not see the infinite wisdom of the Great Creator in so forming the earth and all things therein that He had to drown all but a chosen few, who, after about two thousand years became again so wicked that he had to make his own Son become flesh and suffer and die for them, and even then the number saved was so small compared with those that were lost that it seemed to him almost a useless sacrifice. He ought to have seen it as they did, and agreed with them, but he did not, and many was the hard word and unkind look that he got for such blindness. At that time he had no support from geology and but little from astronomy.

We think it was in the fall and winter of 1842-3 that there was a great protracted meeting and revival in Clinton. No one did much else but go to church for three months, and every male adult but one belonged to some church. Peter was a pillar in the Universalist church. Still he always attended the evening meetings and aided them with his presence and assisted them in singing; and then when the people were in a stage of excitement, not now seen and hardly believed and which nothing but religious frenzy could produce, they would be dismissed, he would mount a bench and in his peculiar manner and voice, say: "I want to say to the congregation that three weeks from next Friday night the gospel will be preached in this house." He must have given out an appointment, similar to this, twenty times during that winter, and it was always filled by someone. He had a faculty of giving out his appointments at the worst possible time, when it would give the most annoyance to others.

Like a woman, he knew when and where to stick a pin that would make the greatest pain and the longest smart, and to a looker-on these thrusts and counter-thrusts were often amusing. Peter never felt that he had lost anything in such contests. It was a wonder that he was not, by the pious souls around him, "plunged as a brand into the burning," but no violence was ever offered him.

By accident one night he was at the same house and came to church in the same crowd with one of the young sisters, and every one there will remember the particular prayer put up for that "ewe lamb," and how Deity, who undoubtedly had never heard of Peter Gideon before, was full informed in language the strongest and most forcible of that day all about him and their wishes in regard to him. No man enjoyed the ridiculousness of the whole scene more than Peter, but he outlived it all and made even those that prayed for him respect him. Had we the pen of Egleston, the early contests between the "Stalwart Universalist" on one side, the orthodox churchmen on the other, would be a fitting subject. The history of the early religious excitements in Clinton cannot be written without his being a large factor in it. He early taught the religious element that a man could be an abolitionist, universalist, and temperance man, and yet have some claims to their respect. Our objection was that his abolitionism always helped the Democrats and his temperance aided the cause of intemperance. At that early day he showed the dawning of that taste and patient experimenting in the raising of fruit that has done so much for the State of Minnesota.

He must have left this county for Minnesota early in its history, say in 1853 or 54, and located at once where he now lives, and gave his entire attention to his farm and fruit, patiently trying all kinds for years, and at last settling down in the conviction that only a seedling apple raised in Minnesota could be made a success in that cold climate. Following out that idea he has succeeded in raising two seedlings, one he calls the "Wealthy," after his wife; the name of the other we do not remember, if we ever heard it, which places him in the front rank amongst fruit-growers in the North-west. Every one remembers the big orchard, now owned by Col. SNELL, which he planted and raised here, and from which no one was ever turned away without having all he or she could eat.

When he went to Minnesota no one believed that apples could be raised there. After an experience of twenty-five years he has demonstrated that apples and good ones, can be raised as far North as where he lives. His services to the State of Minnesota, and to the whole North-west, have been beyond computation, and yet we do not see his name mentioned in some of the histories of Minnesota written and published long after he became a citizen and a successful fruit raiser in that State. In this it may be that his peculiar beliefs may have had something to do with this neglect and inattention. If so, it is the worse for the persons getting up the books, showing their injustice to him, and to the State, by not naming a man who has done so much for all—giving it and himself a reputation abroad of which both should be proud.

In agricultural papers in the East, every few months we see an inquiry as to what fruit can be raised in Northern Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota, and they are told to write to Peter M. Gideon, or referred to some article written by him in the papers. Many of our citizens have seen his farm and fruit, partaken of his hospitality, seen and know of his struggles and success, and from them we are glad to learn of his good fortune and competence for his old age, and to know that the legislature of his adopted State appreciates his efforts and employs his ability in raising and managing trees for the orchard. May he live to visit us many times, and enjoy during a long life the reward of his labor.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FARMING DOES PAY WHEN PRACTICALLY FOLLOWED.

Eleven years ago Jacob ZEIGLER came from McLean county and rented Judge DAVIS's seventeen hundred acre farm in Texas township. He had but seven hundred dollars in cash; but he had what was far better than money, any amount of pluck and energy. He managed his farm on business principles, and so diversified its products as to make them pay. After eleven years as a renter he now enters upon his own farm as an independent land owner. A little more than a year ago he bought three hundred and seven acres about three miles southeast of this city, for which he paid between $12,000 and $13,000 in cash. During the eleven years he has lived as a renter on Judge Davis's farm he has cleared over $22,000, besides his living expenses, every dollar of which he has property to show for. Two weeks ago he sold over $8,000 worth of stock and farming machinery, and has as much more left to begin life on his new farm. Such men as Jake Zeigler make the wealthy farmers of our State.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 10, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

More than thirty years ago Mr. B. L. COLWELL and his wife and children came from Mechanicsburg, Ohio, and settled on a farm within three miles of this city, where Mr. Colwell made one of the pleasantest homes in the county. Here many of his children were born and married and went out into homes of their own. The family scattered east and west, and the old folks were left alone on the homestead. As several of their daughters are living near Wood River, Neb., the old folks decided to make a new home in their midst, and a few weeks ago Mr. Colwell sold his farm here. Last Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Colwell went back to their old Ohio home to spend a few months amid old scenes, when they will go to their children in Nebraska. It was hard work for them to tear away from the home and neighborhood they had lived in for over thirty years, and the neighborhood felt sad at the separation. The best wishes of their old friends will follow Mr. and Mrs. Colwell through their remaining years.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WALTER'S SCHOOL HOUSE.

The following is a report of the pupils of Walter’s school who have carried three or more studies: Daniel Sullivan 100, Edward Sullivan 99, Myrt Sullivan 98, Chas. Wagner 94, Annie Wagner 97, Maggie Wagner 98, Mary Wagner 100, Kate Wagner 100, Lenora Walters 99, Darius Walters 98, Ora Walters 99, Jessie Walters 99, Kate Rhea 100, John Rhea 98, Mike Rhea 98, James Rhea 96, Kate Merriman 100, Patrick Keating 100, Timothy Keating 100, Allan Spencer 99, Frank Spencer 90, Jas. Flaherty 97, Mary Flaherty 98, Mary Burns 100. Miss Kate Merriman received the first prize, Miss Mary Wagner the second, Miss Mary Flaherty the third, and Miss Mary Burns the fourth. Deportment of each, 100. The attendance has been comparatively good during the year. The school was taught 110 days. Number enrolled, 34.

J. M. Keating,
Teacher.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Bill HOUSTON who is of unsound mind, has been in jail for some time to prevent him from doing mischief. It is impossible to get him into an insane asylum, so the sheriff has been ordered to provide Bill with a stout ball and chain and send him down to the poor farm to live. Unless Bill is secured he will not stay at the poor farm.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 14, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Bill HOUSTON’s ball and chain have arrived, and he will now be transferred to the poor farm from the jail. Bill is a crank, but cannot be kept at the poor farm without weight attached to his legs.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 21, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Frank VANCE, supervisor of Rutledge township, was the victim of a bad accident last Saturday evening. He was on a load of hay, which he was hauling from the field to his barn, and when the wagon was crossing a ditch the pin connecting the fore wheels pulled out. The horses made a sudden plunge and dragged the fore wheels out from under the wagon which let the front part down to the ground. Mr. Vance fell forward and struck his forehead with great force against the hay-rack. The blow was so violent that the upper part of Mr. Vance’s body was completely paralyzed and for several hours his life was despaired of. Latest advices yesterday afternoon say that Mr. Vance is still very feeble, and that it is with great difficulty that he can move his arms and legs, and that his whole body feels numb from the shock. Hopes are entertained, however, that he will not be permanently disabled by the accident.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 21, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

AN IMPORTANT BUSINESS CHANGE.

For several weeks Mr. John W. DAY, who was then living in Colorado, was in correspondence with parties here for the purchase of one of the drug stores, and when he learned that possibly Dr. HUNT would sell out, as he has strong inclinations of going to California to live, Mr. Day immediately telegraphed that he would buy the stock if it was for sale. An answer brought Mr. Day to Clinton, and he and his family arrived here last Friday afternoon. It took but little time for Dr. Hunt and Mr. Day to settle the basis for the trade, and on Monday they began invoicing the stock. Last night they had completed the job. Mr. Day feels like getting back home in that store, for it was there he began his career in the drug business in Clinton under Mr. Geo. W. PHILLIPS. He will be welcomed to Clinton by his hosts of friends and customers. Since Dr. and Mrs. COCHRAN and Mr. Sam. HUNT went to California a year ago, Dr. Hunt and his wife have had strong ties to draw them to the Golden State; and Mrs. Hunt’s recent trip to California only enhanced the desire to be near her children. The Doctor will probably remain in Clinton till about the first of June, by which time he will be ready to bid farewell to Illinois. There is general regret at the thought of the Doctor leaving here, for his long residence in this county has thoroughly identified him with its people.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 21, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Some time ago Bill HUSTON [aka William Houston] was arrested and taken before Judge INGHAM, on the charge that it was unsafe to allow him to be at large on account of his mental infirmities. Bill had been considered harmless for a long time, but in one of his bad fits he threatened to knife some young men for some fancied injury. A jury decided it was not safe to allow Huston his liberty, and as admission could not be had for him in the insane hospital at Jacksonville, the Judge ordered him to be confined in jail. The board of supervisors afterward thought that Bill could be kept better at the poor farm than in jail, so they made an order to have him removed to that place, at the same time instructing the sheriff to get a ball and chain so that Bill could not escape from the poor farm. Obedient to orders, the sheriff sent Huston to the poor farm last week, but the overseer of the farm refused to receive him. Bill is still at large in the streets of this city, and if he should happen to do injury to anyone the county would probably have a heavy bill of damages to pay.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 2, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

TEXAS.

Near SMALLWOOD’s mill last Monday, six young Reynard’s dug out of a bank. Smallwood has five of them and G. T. McKINNEY has one on exhibition at home.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 9, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

LAST FRIDAY'S STORM.

The religious enthusiast out in Iowa who a few months ago sold all his land and personal property for the purpose of building an ark may not have been so badly demented after all. It is true he may have been somewhat mistaken about receiving news from a Divine source that the world was to be for a second time destroyed by a flood, but the season thus far has surely indicated that there is a leakage somewhere in the weather bureau. For the past four or five weeks bright days have been the exception. But last Friday seemed to cap the climax of the bad weather. For nearly twenty-four hours the rain poured down in steady torrents. The farmers looked blue enough over the past rains, but on Friday they were totally discouraged. It did seem from the way the water came down that the fields could not possibly dry out during the rest of the season. The lowlands were one vast sheet of water, and every creek and rivulet was more than bank full. Ten-mile and Salt Creek were booming, and fences and bridges were swept before the torrent like so much drift wood.

The iron bridge that spans Salt Creek on the Marion road, near MORRISON’s mill, was sent whirling from its abutments last Saturday morning and turned over end for end several times in its passage down the stream. The abutments were washed out, and all the bottom land along the creek was submerged in water. Just before this bridge was carried away, Phil WOLFE, I. N. BAILER and another gentleman were about to cross it. Phil stepped on the bridge and as he did so, he felt it tremble as the seething flood rushed up against its sides. No sooner had he stepped off the bridge when downstream it went with a crash. The iron framework of the bridge now lays in the creek about a hundred yards below, but fortunately it has not received any serious injury beyond the loss of the planks. It will have to be taken to pieces before it can be rebuilt. Notwithstanding the vast volume of water in the creek last Saturday, by Tuesday the stream could be easily forded by a team.

Long Point Creek, which runs through Wapella township, has eight bridges between LeRoy and the Kickapoo. Seven of these bridges were washed out.

The new Texas bridge, on the Clinton and Decatur road, was so severely wrenched in the center that it will have to be overhauled to secure it safely.

Ten-mile was raging from one end to the other. That part of the creek that runs through the cemetery overflowed its banks and covered the entire bottom with water.

The Central lake, out at the machine shops, overflowed its banks, covering the yard and flooding the floors of the machine shops. The water raised so high that it put out the fire under the stationary boiler in the engine room. The side track between the coal shed and the machine shops was covered with water, and the main track for a length of about one hundred yards was washed out at several points. It was not deemed safe to allow trains to pass over the main track so the side track was used till the damage could be repaired. In the shops the water was several inches deep on the floors and the men were not able to work that day. The rats were driven from their hiding places around the shop and sought refuge from the flood by climbing up on the work benches and wherever they could get out of the reach of the water.

Over in Mr. MOORE’s fields, as far back from the lake as the eye could reach was one vast sea of water. One would suppose from the scene that it would take weeks for all this water to absorb in the ground, yet by Monday scarcely a vestige of the flood could be seen. The water in the lake rapidly sank to a level with its outlet and this drained Mr. Moore’s fields.

One of the most astonishing features of the storm, considering that nearly four inches of rain fell on Friday and during the night, is the rapid manner which the water has been absorbed. By noon on Tuesday the streets of the city and the country roads were as dry as though only a summer shower had sprinkled them. Farmers who thought on Saturday that it would be a week at least before they could resume work in the fields were busy plowing on Tuesday forenoon. Except on very low ground where no tiling has been done the soil turned over nicely. And this storm gave one of the finest illustrations of the value of tile draining farms. Notwithstanding the large rainfall during the past month, the farmers feel hopeful of raising a fair crop of corn.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 9, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

TEXAS.

SMALLWOOD’s mill still stands on its pegs and is in a dangerous condition.

Miss Fanny BLAKE, who has been teaching school in Lincoln during the past three months, came home last Friday for the summer vacation.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 23, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. F. S. McCUDDY has been dangerously sick for the past week or ten days, and at times it was feared that he could not recover. The symptoms this morning are more hopeful.

[See obituary]


July 7, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A SURGICAL OPERATION.

Some three years ago Mr. William Rutledge, one of the pioneers of DeWitt county, began to complain of cold feet, and at nights, when going to bed, he had to have his lower extremities heavily bandaged to keep him from suffering from the cold. Shortly afterward his right toe became gangrened, and two weeks ago he had it amputated. But this did not stop the spread of the disease and it still kept spreading. It is what the doctors call senile gangrene, and is always considered dangerous to the patient. Last week a council of five physicians discussed Mr. Rutledge’s condition, and two of the five objected to amputating the limb because of the great risk to Mr. Rutledge. The old gentleman was informed of the decision. Amputation might prove fatal at his time of life and in low condition of health, but to keep the limb was sure death. Last Sunday he decided to submit to the operation, and on Monday Dr. Wright went out to Rutledge township and amputated the old gentleman’s right leg at the knee joint.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


July 7, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. F. A. HANGER met with a serious accident last Friday afternoon. While running after a beef at the slaughter-house he stepped into a hole and fell, at the same time striking his right shoulder against the end of a rail, breaking his collar bone and slivering it into several pieces. He jumped up and was running again before realizing his misfortune. He was brought home and Dr. WILCOX was called, who bandaged the wound, and the patient is now doing well. It will be six weeks or two months before Mr. Hanger will be able to do any work.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


July 14, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

On July 2d, 1882, Logan SHUE, aged 15, son of Mr. John SHUE, of Wilson township, became angered at some work he was compelled to do, owing to his father’s sickness, and left home, since which time his whereabouts have been unknown. The youth has caused his parents much sorrow by his actions, and they desire that any person having information of him will let them know and relieve their minds of much trouble. His parents request him to return to his home, where he will be treated with kindness and home made a pleasure to him henceforth. He left home in his shirt sleeves, overalls, kip boots, straw and wool hat, wears his hair low on forehead, light complected, rather dark brown eyes, sparely built, rather awkward, weighs about ninety pounds, auburn hair, and about five feet high. Papers please copy and oblige his parents, who are greatly grieved over his absence. Any person giving information of his whereabouts will be liberally rewarded. Address John Shue, Clinton, DeWitt County, Illinois.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


July 28, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A social party was given Miss Ruth A. SPRAGUE, at the residence of her brother, Mr. B. C. SPRAGUE, on the evening of July 22d, in commemoration of her birthday. Mr. J. T. and Mrs. B. C. SPRAGUE were appointed to send out invitations. The evening being a delightful one, the neighbors, friends, and relatives came in full force and enjoyed a pleasant time. Refreshments were served up in an excellent manner. No pains were spared to make everything pleasant. Miss Nellie SACKETT, Miss Ione WAGGONER, and others, rendered some very fine vocal and instrumental music.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


July 28, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

William HOUSTON has again been confined in the county jail, this time he having threatened the life of a prominent gentleman of this city. Bill is a fit subject for an asylum or to be kept in constant restraint. It is dangerous to allow him his liberty, for at no time is he in a sane condition. The phantom of his brain is that he is the rightful owner of a large amount of property, and his suspicion rests upon one and then upon another as keeping him out of his wealth. At times he becomes really dangerous and, were it not that people are constantly on their guard against him, he might do great injury, even to the taking of life. The officials of the county should make some permanent arrangements for his safe keeping.

(See next article)

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 25, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A TRIPLE MURDER IN LOGAN COUNTY.

Last Sunday news was received in this city that three men had been found dead on a farm between Mt. Pulaski and Chestnut. The murdered men had their throats cut, and had evidently been dead for two or three days. Charles McMAHON, the owner of the farm, was a bachelor, and he had in his employ two farm hands, the three keeping bachelor’s hall. The bodies were first discovered by a Mr. LONG, who went to McMahon’s house to notify him that one of his horses had broken out of the pasture field and was roaming around among the neighboring cornfields. Long went into the house and finding no one about he started across a field when he found the body of one of the hired men laying dead near a corn-crib. Long immediately alarmed the neighborhood, and after a search the bodies of McMahon and the other hired man were found. The murdered men were apparently preparing for bed on the night of the attack, for beside their beds was their clothing as if they had been preparing to retire when they were surprised. The beds had evidently not been slept in as the covers had not even been turned down. It would appear that McMahon and one of the men were surprised, bound and gagged before the third man was attacked, for evidently Carlock had made some resistance when the murderers attacked him. The three victims were dragged from the house and then their throats were cut. What was the incentive to the crime is not known, as McMahon was a prudent man and never kept any money in his house. A hired man whom McMahon had discharged for incompetency was suspected of the crime, as he swore to get even with McMahon. The crime is a mystery and large rewards have been offered in the hope that the murderers might be tracked.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


September 29, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY.

An Honest DeWitt County Farmer Picked Up in the Streets of Bloomington and Transported to Kansas City on the Charge of Passing Counterfeit Money.

On Thursday of last week, says the Bloomington Pantagraph, Mr. Thomas WOOD, who lives near Fullerton, DeWitt county, came to Bloomington on business and in the evening, just as the Denver train was coming into town, was walking along a street near the Union depot, he was suddenly arrested by two men claiming to be detectives from Kansas City, for passing a fifty-dollar counterfeit bill on a merchant of that city. Mr. Wood protested his innocence, asserting that he was an old citizen of DeWitt county, Illinois, and he told his captors that if they would come into the business part of Bloomington he would soon convince them of the truth of what he said. They gave little attention to Mr. Wood’s words, but read a warrant to him and hurried him to the depot and onto the train, and they were soon on the road for Kansas City. When the train crossed the river into Missouri the detectives read another warrant to Mr. Wood. When they arrived in Kansas City, Friday morning, Mr. Wood was taken at once to the man to whom the counterfeit bill had been passed for identification. The man said that Mr. Wood was not the guilty man. The detectives were greatly nonplussed and crestfallen. Mr. Wood demanded at their hands some reparation for the great wrong they had done him. They told him to take a seat and they would go and see what could be done about it. As soon as they left, it occurred to Mr. W. that perhaps he had better go with the detectives, and he stepped on the sidewalk in time only to see them turn a corner, and that was the last he ever saw of them. He at once went to the depot and procured a ticket to Bloomington, where he arrived Saturday morning on the 9:30 train a tired and vexed man. The detectives paid his fare to Kansas City, but he had to pay his fare back to Bloomington. Mr. Wood says he is sixty years of age, and this is the first time he was ever arrested or charged with committing a crime. He has lived in DeWitt county more than twenty years and has a wide circle of acquaintances in DeWitt, McLean and adjoining counties and is known as an industrious, honest and worthy citizen by every one of them. Mr. Wood was seen at the I. B. & W. depot just before he took the train for home and from him this strange story was learned. Mr. J. W. CURTIS, an old citizen and teacher of Eastern McLean county, was present and heard Mr. Wood’s narrative. He is well acquainted with Mr. Wood, who, he says, is one of the best old men in the country. It was not known before that a man in this free country could be thus seized and forced on a train and hurried to a distant State and city in spite of himself.

The Illinois Statewide Marriage Index:
WOOD, THOMAS   SLATTEN, EMILY   DE WITT   01/24/1857

Submitted by Judy Simpson


October 13, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Col. Geo. B. LEMEN, one of the old veterans of DeWitt county, went to Chicago last week with his son James and spent the Sabbath visiting his children who are living in the city. It being the old gentleman's seventy-third birthday, his children presented him with a costly gold-headed cane as a souvenir of their affection for the father who had cared for them in infancy and aided them through all their years.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


October 27, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DEWITT.

The weather still continues fine and the farmers are taking advantage of it. Quite a number of them are building barns and dwellings, which makes us think that times are good.

Uncle Elijah WATT, who has been to the Hot Springs for some time, is back, looking much better.

Rev. LAPHAM and M. M. ROBBINS have found their horses, which they feared were stolen. They had strayed away up near Leroy.

Quite an interesting lawsuit is pending between two of our merchants. It is M. M. ROBBINS vs. C. L. OAKFORD for butchering a hog when Robbins was not at home to take care of it.

Mrs. D. F. ROBBINS is very sick; considered dangerous.

It is generally healthy in this part of the county; at least we would judge so from seeing our M.D.’s watching on the corner.

The stock men are scarce this week since the decline. We can often count as many as a dozen traders in our town at once.

Hen. MYERS is as quiet as a lamb.

Abe MYERS has a new title affixed to his name—that of M.D. (Mule driver)

O, why don’t some one get married, elope or create a sensation in some manner, so as to furnish us with some items. Our town being so peaceful it is impossible for the correspondent to furnish much news for our devouring readers unless we manufacture some, and not being a professional reporter, however, we must settle back into our narrow channel of thought and give our readers what little news we could glean from our limited observation. [Cheers.]

On last Thursday, LINCOLN & HOLZER, proprietors of the "Dew drop in" saloon, sold their business to Barney O’NEIL, who will still continue the business.

Mrs. D. ROBBINS has been very sick for the past week but at the present writing she is much better. Her many friends will be glad to hear of her convalescing.

Mr. Otto SWIGART, republican central committeeman for DeWitt township, was in town on Tuesday making arrangements for Capt. ROWELL’s meeting.

A grand shooting tournament took place on last Saturday in S. TREGO’s pasture west of town. Many of our expert nimrods were present and enjoyed themselves hugely; everything passed off quietly. We did not learn who was the champion.

We noticed C. L. OAKFORD & Co., have just received a large assortment of that famous Shellabarger flour. We have used this brand and can highly recommend it to consumers.

T. BOSLER and wife passed through our city last Sunday en route for their home in Farmer City.

Ed. BOSSERMAN, the smiling dry goods and postal clerk, on Tuesday left the confusion and bustle of city life and spent the day pleasantly hunting the fowls of the forest.

Miss Mollie LAFFERTY seems to know the wants of her lady friends and is just in receipt of a full line of fancy millinery, comprising all the latest designs and styles.

Many of our citizens are talking of erecting a new school house, as the present one is not large enough to accommodate all the pupils comfortably. There is nothing that adds so materially to a town as a good school room, and we know if a good building is erected we have the men who have the educational interest at heart to see that these interests are maintained.

The Rev. LAPHAM, on last Sunday delivered a very scholarly sermon to an appreciative audience.

Ed. SWIGART, a student of Lombard University, Galesburg, smiled upon one of DeWitt’s fair daughters on last Friday eve. We would have been pleased to have met this gentleman, but as his attentions were otherwise engaged, we only got a glimpse of his hat.

Chas. RICHTER is making several improvements on his dwelling.

Wm. MYERS is having his house north of town treated to a fresh coat of paint.

Mr. BROWN and wife, of Carbondale, are visiting this city.

The Republicans had a grand and enthusiastic meeting in the brick church on Wednesday night, at which addresses were delivered by Captain ROWELL and Dr. CALHOUN. Both speakers received the closest attention, and as a result the Republicans have received a new baptism that will bring forth fruit on election day.

Parents in District No. 5 should not forget to send their children to school next Monday. The school will be conducted by Miss Emma ROBBINS.

The "merry hop" at Parnell Tuesday evening ended in a row—Parnell against North Fork. The latter came out second best.

I noticed in last week’s paper a few remarks about the young ladies of DeWitt calling around and taking the gentlemen mashers out for a ride. Now, I presume the so-called mashers would as soon be called out to take a ride as to be entertained by some of the young ladies in the parlors with a prize fighter or a kicking match. We are sorry for the boys that all of [the] ladies have not buggies, but they are not ashamed to ride in a wagon. So come along with your carts and professors for drivers.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 10, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Drew INMAN, our popular general merchant, was agreeably surprised last Saturday night in a manner that will doubtless be long and pleasantly remembered by himself and family. Saturday [Nov. 4] was his thirty-fifth birthday anniversary, and two weeks ago his wife instituted a movement to surprise him by inviting a number of the members of the Knights of Pythias lodge to their house that evening to take tea, to be there when he arrived home. Mr. Inman is a popular member of this order, and is now serving his second term as Chancellor Commander; and as this occasion afforded a good opportunity for his fraters to give evidence of their appreciation of his fealty toward their society, they made use of it by presenting him with an elegant Knight of Pythias watch charm—the finest they could procure. It was presented with a speech by Frank M. BURROUGHS, in behalf of his brethren, just after indulging in a magnificent feast, prepared by the hostess, who proved herself capable of entertaining the most pronounced epicurean. The only regret of all parties concerned was that all the Pythians could not take part in the entertainment of their worthy brother, but the capacity of the house would not admit of it. The name of the donors of the charm were: Frank M. BURROUGHS, Lyman H. HENRY, Judge INGHAM, A. C. HOSMER, Richard BUTLER, H. L. HUNTER, William METZGER, C. L. ROBBINS, Charles E. NAGELY, A. H. MAGILL, A. L. FRIEDMAN, F. O. PEASE, M. L. WOY, Samuel MONLUX, A. W. RAZEY, N. E. WHEELER, E. G. ARGO, H. L. KEELER, E. F. PHARES.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Two sales of Clinton property were made this week. Mr. Jacob VOGEL bought Mr. Henry KATZ’s residence on North Monroe street, paying for it $2500 cash. Yesterday Mr. W. Z. DEWEY sold his residence to Mr. O. E. HARRIS for $1450.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The Catholics of this city held a fair for two evenings this week, out of which about $200 was realized. The contest for the gold-headed cane was between Mr. L. FREUDENSTEIN and Don O’DONALD. Don’s friends piled in the dollars and won the cane for him.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

S. C. McGLUMPHEY, son of the President of the Lincoln college, robbed the express office in Lincoln last week, for which he was arrested and place under a bond of $300 for his appearance last Tuesday. McGlumphey failed to report and his bond was forfeited. His father preferred paying the bond rather than his scapegrace son should go the penitentiary.

[Note: This is Samuel C. McGlumphy, son of Andrew Jackson McGlumphy.]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Last Tuesday Dr. CALHOUN was thirty-eight years old. To celebrate the event, Mrs. CALHOUN had quietly invited the Doctor’s mother and his brothers and sisters to come to Clinton on that day. When the Doctor went home that evening with a beefsteak to be cooked for supper his wife took him into the parlor and introduced him to his relations. The meeting was a pleasant surprise to the Doctor and an enjoyable evening was spent in celebrating the anniversary of the auspicious day on which was born a Representative to the Illinois legislature. The Doctor’s relatives united in presenting him with a very handsome easy chair.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

We learn that Mr. Ephraim B. HARROLD and his brothers have decided upon selling their landed possessions in Wapella township and that they will move their families to Texas, where the Harrold Bros. have concentrated all their interest in the cattle business. A few years ago Eph. Harrold went to Texas and bought a lot of cattle. Year after year they have added to the herd till now the Harrold Bros. own not less than fifty thousand head of cattle. Every year their shipments of stock amount to a small fortune, till now they can count their wealth by the hundreds of thousands. They deserve success, for they are honest and enterprising. They expect to move their families to Texas before the new year.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The fat men of McLean county are to have a Thanksgiving dinner in Bloomington next Thursday at which Judge DAVIS will preside. No one with a record of less than 225 pounds will be allowed to sit at the table.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A RUNAWAY AND ITS RESULTS.

Tuesday afternoon Mr. BOOKER, an agent for a Champaign tombstone factory, was riding in his buggy along Madison street, north of the Gilman railroad crossing, and behind him was Mr. SMITH, of Wapella, in a spring wagon with two yoking ladies. One of the wheels of Smith’s wagon dropped into a rut and threw Smith out. This scared his horses and they started on a run. The young ladies jumped from the wagon, and the horses having no one to check their speed became wild and dashed off in a sweeping run. Crash they went into Booker’s buggy, wrecking it so that no two parts of it were left together. Booker was thrown out and was badly bruised on the body and about the face and head, and one of his front teeth was broken. When he was picked up it was thought that Booker had received such injuries as would prove fatal, but by the aid of restoratives and the promptness of the physicians he came out of his stupor safely. Booker was around town the next morning, feeling sore and stiff from his injuries. Smith and the young ladies escaped without injury.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. William LITSENBERGER and family, of Wilson township, desire to publicly express their heartfelt thanks to their friends and neighbors who so kindly rendered them sympathy and assistance during the deep affliction through which they have recently passed, in the death of a beloved wife and mother.

[See the obituary of John HUMPHREY]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 24, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. W. W. McABOY has for some time been confined to her home and she claims that her disability is caused by injuries she received because of a broken plank in the sidewalk in front of Mrs. R. Crang’s property. Last Monday night Mr. McABOY, by letter, called the attention of the city council to his wife’s case, and asked the city to reimburse him for the injuries she received. The case was referred to the finance committee for investigation, and a report will probably be made next Monday night.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


December 1, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HOW THANKSGIVING WAS OBSERVED.

To begin with, every body who could get a turkey bought one, but the national bird was remarkably scarce, and many a table had to substitute other kinds of poultry. During the early morning hours our merchants did a thriving business, but at ten o’clock the stores were all closed and the proprietors and their clerks took a holiday till four o’clock in the afternoon.

UNION THANKSGIVING SERVICES were held in the Presbyterian Church at eleven o’clock in the forenoon, and a larger congregation than is usual on such occasions assembled to return thanks for the blessings enjoyed during the past year. All of the pastors in the city took part in the exercises, the sermon being delivered by the Rev. T. I. COULTAS. The sermon is highly complimented by those who heard it for its practical teachings and for the scholarship displayed in its preparation. Mr. Coultas is a pleasant talker and commands the attention of his audience.

THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS gave their sixth annual ball in the evening. DeWitt Hall was handsomely decorated for the occasion, and all of Clinton’s youth and beauty, with a fair sprinkling of venerable sires and mothers, assembled to enjoy the pleasures of the evening. The Knights have been noted in past years for their elegant entertainments, but last night was the crowning triumph. By eight o’clock the hall was crowded with joyous pleasure seekers, and a little later the members of the lodge marched in, in full uniform, and after going through a few evolutions the floor was cleared for dancing, and till four o’clock this morning the dancers made good use of their time. Goodman’s excellent orchestra from Decatur furnished the music. At midnight a sumptuous banquet was provided at the Magill House, to which more than one hundred and fifty guests sat down. Mr. and Mrs. Razey made a special effort on this occasion, and they were highly complimented by all of the guests.

Many a poor family in Clinton had cause for gratitude to their more fortunate neighbors for some little delicacies to season their own homely fare.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


December 1, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Amos WEEDMAN, as honest and as kind a soul as ever held office in DeWitt county, will retire from official life on next Monday, after six years duty as sheriff of this county. He has leased the Commercial House in Farmer City, and by the 10th of this month he will be duly installed as landlord. Mr. Weedman is refurnishing the house from top to bottom and will make the Commercial one of the most attractive hotels in the state. Six years ago Mr. Weedman was elected sheriff and twice since was he re-elected by largely increased majorities at both elections. He made a popular officer, discharging all the unpleasant duties of sheriff without bearing heavily on the unfortunates with whom he came in official contact. While he dealt kindly with everybody, yet he did his duty fearlessly and impartially. Those who have business around the court-house will miss the kindly face of Uncle Amos, and all will unite in wishing him abundant prosperity in his new calling of landlord.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


BACK TO NEWSPAPER INDEX