NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS - 1877

January 12, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

Elder J. S. BARGER, who died in Bloomington last week, was at one time the owner of Col. Snell's home farm and lived here for many years.


Lecture—Mr. B. F. STAMATE will lecture in the Baptist Church in this city on Thursday evening, January 25. Subject: "History of Civilization." Admission twenty-five cents.


Last week Mr. J. B. HALDEMAN admitted his son Charles into partnership with him in the DeWitt Merchant Mills, giving him one-third interest. With such a start in life young Haldeman ought to feel reasonably happy.


Ben F. SHERMAN, formerly a merchant in this city, was on the ill-fated train that went through the Ashtabula bridge, but fortunately escaped without injury. Mr. Sherman was en route to his home in Bloomington.


Card of Thanks.—The Sabbath-school of the Baptist Church desire to return thanks to Mr. VANDERVOORT, of Harp township, for his kindness in donating two fine evergreen trees, for their festivities on Christmas eve.


Some inhuman brute spent last Monday night somewhere in town comfortably housed, while his poor horse was left tied to a hitching post all night. Officer PHARES' attention was called to the horse Tuesday morning, and he took the poor brute to CREW & TAYLOR's livery stable.


In the distribution of offices in the Illinois Senate, Mr. GLESSNER, of the Register, received the appointment of First Assistant Enrolling and Engrossing Clerk, at a salary of $6 per day. Mr. HARROLD, of DeWitt, was appointed mail carrier to the Senate.


PERSONAL.

Mr. J. H. PROVIN, an old-time resident of Harp township, but now of Wilson county, Kansas, is now in this county on a business and pleasure trip. A couple of years ago Mr. Provin sold eighty acres off his farm in Harp for $2400, and then invested $1600 for 230 acres in Wilson county, Kansas. He has been very fortunate in his new location and thinks he can make as much as he did while living here.


We regret to learn that Harry S. CHAPPELEAR, of Farmer City, has been compelled, by the hard times, to make an assignment of his business for the benefit of his creditors. Mr. Jacob VOGEL is the assignee. We learn that Mr. Chappelear's assets are more than sufficient to meet all his liabilities, but the difficulty in making collections compelled him to make an assignment to save all of his creditors We hope that his misfortunes will be but temporary.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 12, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WEALTHY WELDS.

Wealth is not always the result of hard labor, but it oftener comes through being the owner of land that in time becomes valuable from its surroundings. Many of the great fortunes in this country had their origin in corner lots; but while this is so, we would not advise everybody to rush into corner lot speculation. Bob Ingersoll says that the wealth of the nation is dug from the bowels of the earth. Well, this may be true in part, but the wealth of inpiduals oftener comes from the chance of location of that earth. For instance, the Messrs. WELD, who live a little south of this city, have been toiling industriously from their youth up, and while they have scientifically and muscularly tilled the soil, and perchance made some money, the wealth in store for them comes not from their fine farms in DeWitt county but from a little patch of land in their old New England home.

Some sixty or seventy years ago the father of the Messrs. Weld leased a forty acre tract of land within four miles of the old State-house in Boston, for which he was to pay 12 cents per acre, the lease running for ninety-nine years. An adjoining twenty acres he bought outright, for which he paid the entire price from the first year's crop. The elder Weld was a poor young man, and on this land he settled with his young wife. For years he cultivated the sixty acres, when one day the parties from whom he leased the original forty made the proposition that if he would give up his interest in the ninety-nine year lease of twenty acres, they would give him a clear title to the ownership of the other twenty. Mr. Weld agreed to the proposition, for in this way he was getting twenty acres of now valuable land for nothing.

On the remaining forty acres Mr. and Mrs. Weld lived during their lifetime, and in the old homestead they raised a family of ten children, all of whom are now living. About five years ago, the elder Mr. Weld died and left his estate to be pided equally among his children, appointing his sons a board of trustees to manage the property in the interest of the whole family.

This forty acres, which in the early days was bought for almost nothing, now turns out to be a regular bonanza. Its close proximity to the city of Boston has given it a value for business and residence purposes that the elder Weld never dreamed of when he was tilling the soil and raising cabbages, potatoes and onions. It is situated on Washington Street, a leading thoroughfare extending from Boston to Providence, the street being about forty miles in length, and retaining the same name from one end to the other. Besides this a railway, on which trains run every hour in the day and late into the night, has its depot adjoining the Weld farm. The value of the forty acres is now estimated at $400,000. The land is yet cultivated by one of the brothers as a farm, for the heirs having no immediate use for their share of the money have determined to hold on to it as long as possible, as the increasing value pays a handsome interest. Mr. Edwin Weld paid a visit to the old homestead a few weeks ago, and from him we gather the above items.

The members of the Weld family have been extremely fortunate in this life, all of them being in comfortable circumstances. One of the sisters was left a widow a few weeks ago, her husband leaving an estate worth over a million dollars to be pided between her and her two children.

It is an old saying, and in the case of the Weld family, a true one, that it is better to be born lucky than rich. The love of the elder Weld for the homestead caused him to hold on to it. It was a home for him and his aged wife during their lives; it is now a handsome fortune for their ten children.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 12, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ONLY TOO TRUE.

We have noticed in passing through the various parts of the city, that the young lads have a bad habit of skating up and down the sidewalks. We have nothing particularly against their skating, but it is very unpleasant for pedestrians who have to use the walks. Of course everyone has their "ups and downs," but when one looses his equilibrium without a moment's notice, it makes him exclaim rather angrily, "sauer kraut am bully tings," as a thousand stars pass before his vision. When he comes to his senses, he could just take all the skates and boys and pile them in a heap and set fire to it. Well, a fellow is justified in allowing such wicked thoughts to be in his mind, because it is not very funny for a person to build walks and then have them converted into skating rinks without asking the privilege of the owner. A fellow don't care about falling down and breaking his bones every time he has occasion to step on the walk. It's no fun. If the boys want to skate, we would suggest they go to the famous Ten mile; they can skate there without endangering the lives of the average Clintonian. If there is an ordinance prohibiting such things, would it not be a good idea to enforce it. We think it would be in accordance with the desires and wishes of the people. —J. Wesley SLAKE

Submitted by Judy Simpson


January 12, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

MASONIC.—At a recent communication of DeWitt Lodge, No. 84, A. F. & A. M., the following officers were installed for the ensuing year:

John T. CARLE, W. M.
Wm. MONSON, S. W.
Lee S. McGRAW, J. W.
Samuel MAGILL, Treas.
J. T. HAND, Sec.
H. HENSON, S. D.
T. TYRE, J. D.
S. K. HARRELL, Tyler

The following officers were installed in Goodbrake Chapter, No. 59, R. A. M.:

A. D. McHENRY, M. E. H. P.
D. McARTHER, E. K.
Wm. M. PHARES, E. S.
J. T. HAND, C. H.
O. L. KIRK, Treas.
A. H. C. BARBER, Sec.
J. FREUDENSTEIN, P. S.
J. T. CARLE, M. 3d V.
E. SYLVESTER, M. 2d V.
L. S. McGRAW, M. 1st V.
S. K. HARRELL, Tyler

K. P.—Plantagenet Lodge No. 25, Knights of Pythias, last evening installed the following officers for the current term:

Wm. H. HARRISON, P. C. C.
G. W. PORTER, C. C.
F. M. BURROUGHS, V. C.
B. F. HULL, Prelate
J. M. PEARSON, K. R. S.
O. WINSLOW, M. E.
Wm. METZGER, M. F.
H. BOGARDUS, M. A.
A. W. RAZEY, I. G.
W. R. KELLY, O. G.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 9, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

It was a clear case of assault and battery, for the way that woman battered old Ike MORSE's back, at Breuer's corner the other day, was the wonder and admiration of the crowd. She came up behind old Ike, swearing in a foreign tongue that Ike had said naughty things; and as the old man was guiltless he chuckled at her wrath. But she was not to be soothed in that way, for she gave her shawl an extra twirl around her agitated bosom and in splendid style she let fly her left digit between Ike's shoulders. The crowd cheered and this encouraged the fighting female. Ike wouldn't be guilty of striking a woman, but he waltzed her into the mud. The enraged female took her departure disgusted with the lack of spirit in Ike because he wouldn't give her manly satisfaction. Ike declares he never said aught about the woman, and he can't imagine why she should bounce him.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 9, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CAPTURE OF HORSE THIEVES.

Tuesday morning two boys, aged respectively eighteen and twenty years, rode up to CROW's livery stable and left their horses to be fed. The boys were hard-looking seeds, and as they were riding two ___ mares they attracted some notice at the stable. The boys expressed a desire to sell the team, and as there was a horse buyer at the stable a trade was soon struck up for one of the mares at the price of $80. The horse buyer went to the bank for the money. In the mean time Marshal HENSON had received a dispatch from DeLand telling him to be on the lookout for two boys and a pair of dark brown mares. The Marshal went to the stables as the most likely place to get information, and at once struck his game. The boys were out getting something to eat, and the Marshal went in search of them. He met them opposite the post-office and at once made the arrest, locking them up in the calaboose till he should receive further orders. On the morning train from DeLand came Ellis C. REED, the owner of the team, and from him we learn that on Monday evening the two boys were loitering about his farm, which is midway between Weldon and DeLand, but that he did not suspect anything wrong about them. Tuesday morning he went to his stable when he found the lock broken, the door open, and a valuable pair of mares missing. As soon as possible he went to the railroad station and telegraphed his loss and gave a description of the supposed thieves.

The youthful horse thieves say that they came from Ford county; that they were traveling in search of work. They own up to taking the horses but disclaim any intention of stealing them. They said they were tired walking, and finding the stable open they took the horses, intending to ride twelve or fifteen miles and then turn them loose. They came as far as Mr. Henry SIMPSON's farm, about two miles east of town, and finding a good place to sleep they abandoned the horses and crawled under shelter. Tuesday morning when they got up they found that the horses were still in the neighborhood of Mr. Simpson's farm, and that then, for the first time, the thought entered their minds to steal the horses and sell them. The boys also had with them a rifle, shotgun and a silver watch, which they probably picked up on their travels. Tuesday night Marshal Henson took the thieves to Monticello. The grand jury being in session they were indicted on Wednesday, and probably by the last of this week they will be booked for Joliet.

The arrest is a profitable one for Marshal Henson. Piatt county pays $100 each for the arrest of horse thieves, and as there will be no trouble in proving up this case the Marshal will probably get his money when the Piatt supervisors meet in March.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 9, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

GRAND JURORS FOR MARCH TERM.

At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors this week the following grand jury panel was selected for the March term of the circuit court:

Jacob TROWBRIDGE, Tunbridge
F. M. HOWARD, Tunbridge
T. M. CORNWELL, Texas
Joseph WOOLLEY, Texas
R. THRASHER, Creek
Wm. LONG, Creek
Horatio COWAN, Nixon
John W. WASSON, Barnett
Jas. SUMNER, Barnett
J. B. HALDEMAN, Clintonia
W. E. KIRKER, Clintonia
W. H. CARDIFF, Harp
Jacob MAY, Harp
C. RICHTER, DeWitt
Geo. ARBOGAST, DeWitt
John TAYLOR, Waynesville
Chas. JONES, Waynesville
Trustum HULL, Wapella
Dan THOMPSON, Wapella
J. K. DAVIS, Wilson
Geo. W. VANCE, Rutledge
J. N. BONDURANT, Santa Ana
J. B. WHITCOMB, Santa Ana

Submitted by Judy Simpson


February 9, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

AMUSEMENTS.

Our citizens were treated to an amateur theatrical performance last Saturday evening, when members of the order of Good Templars represented the play of "Reclaimed, or the Good Templars' Mission," and "My Turn Next." The first play is intended to teach a lesson of the degradation which follows the use of intoxicating liquor; but we question if the presentation of sin in an attractive form ever leads to repentance and reform. Several of the actors acquitted themselves quite creditably, and Miss Jennie LEWIS, Miss Mollie PEDDICORD, Shelby CONKLIN, Tim HEFFERNAN and Mr. BARBER deserve special mention. "My Turn Next," was a laughable affair and gave an opportunity for Conklin and Heffernan to show off to good advantage. Miss Mollie Peddicord showed considerable ability in the part she performed. Take it all in all, it was a very creditable performance for amateurs. The managers were greeted with a full house. RICHEY & McPHERSON's orchestra played some very fine music. The managers feel thankful for the liberal patronage bestowed and announce that they will give another entertainment tomorrow (Saturday) evening, when in addition to the programme of last Saturday night, will be presented the laughable farce of "The Fellow that Looks Like Me." The price of admission has been reduced to 25 cents and 15 cents for children. The scenery used on the stage was painted by Mr. Sam KIRK, and is very creditable considering it being his first effort at that kind of work. The drop curtain represents a clearing of timber by a running stream. The other scenes represent domestic incidents. We feel like encouraging our young friend to persevere in his amateur efforts as a scene painter.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 23, 187Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DEATH IN THE LAMP

It is but four or five weeks ago that THE PUBLIC contained an account of the burning to death of a girl near Danville, Ill., by the explosion of a coal-oil lamp. The explosion was caused by the girl blowing down the lamp chimney to put out the light. And here let us say that this dangerous manner of putting out coal-oil lamps is practiced by nineteen out of every twenty persons. We have a terrible accident to record that happened near this city, last Saturday night. Mrs. BEAL, who lived about three miles south of Clinton in Texas township, sat reading with her son till between nine and ten o'clock, when she prepared to retire. Standing on the bureau in her bedroom was a large glass lamp, and as she was ready to retire, Mrs. Beal blew down the chimney to put out the light. The sudden puff blew the flame down the burner into the oil, and the result was the lamp exploded. The oil scattered over Mrs. Beal's night clothing and in a second she was one sheet of flame. He son, who was in an adjoining room, head the shrieks of his mother and went to her assistance. He threw a blanket over her head and body to smother the flames, but before he succeeded in putting the fire out, the unfortunate woman was so badly burned that death followed. Mrs. Beal ran outside the house, where the air only fanned the flames to intenser [sic] heat. The presumption is that the deceased must have inhaled the flames while she was enveloped in the blanket, for her face and mouth were badly burned. The unfortunate woman lived till about noon on Sunday, when death relieved her of her pain and suffering. Her body was taken to Marion on Monday evening for interment. The deceased was forty-eight years of age, and was Mr. Beal's second wife.

At the time of the accident Mr. BEAL was lying in bed almost helpless on account of sickness. In his feeble efforts to save his wife, he had his hands and arms burned. At one time there seemed to be a danger that the house would catch fire, but this calamity was averted by the promptness of Mrs. Beal's son.

In one corner of a drawer in the bureau on which the lamp stood there was a goose egg. Some of the burning oil ran into the drawer and covered the egg, and when the flames were extinguished the egg was found to be thoroughly cooked.

We hope that this unfortunate accident will be a warning to those who are in the habit of blowing down lamp chimneys to put out the light.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


March 23, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

There was a social hop at the residence of Dr. DAVIS on last Saturday evening. It was well attended by the young folks and all speak of the occasion as being a pleasant one.


Mrs. S. M. THORP and daughter spent Sunday and a part of this week in this place.


Mr. Marshal PETERSON, formerly a resident of this place, but now of Minnesota, was in town this week visiting friends.


On last Tuesday it was so dark at half-past ten that the teachers had to close the school until noon.


On Tuesday we had a variety of weather—rain, sleet, snow, and hail.


Did you eat your dinner by lamp light last Tuesday? Our merchants had to light their lamps in order to attend to business, something never done before in the memory of the oldest inhabitant of our town. Truly the sun was eclipsed.


Mathew RYAN, of this place, is working in Peoria.


Mr. Daniel THOMPSON will start to the Black Hills country next week.


Mr. Manly CONE and lady returned to their home in Decatur on last Saturday.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 6, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CIRCUIT COURTISMS.

Monday and Tuesday there was no court, as the Judge wished to give every free born American an opportunity to cast his vote for his favorite candidate for the office of highway commissioner.


Three of the Republican Electors were in court yesterday—Messrs. CREA of Decatur, CHAFFEE of ____, and DONAHUE of Clinton. Mr. Chaffee is the Elector Bill SPRINGER tried to bulldoze.


Mr. MOORE was examining a witness in a case for medical attendance. The witness testified that the child was visited so many times a day during its illness and had taken so much medicine. "And did the child live after all that?" said Mr. Moore with a very bland smile. The counsel for the plaintiff objected, and the court ruled that the question was a grave one and therefore need not be answered.


Messrs. WARNER and CARTER, attorneys for BOLIN and EDWARDS, convicted last week and sentenced to two years and six months each at Joliet for appropriating money they found, applied to Judge LACEY, on Wednesday, for a new trial. Counsel brought forth voluminous decisions to fortify their request. The court granted a new trial and fixed the bail bond at $300 each. The case will probably go over till the next term, and unless the prisoners can furnish bail they will have to languish in prison at the expense of the county till the August term.


TRIAL BY JURY IS GOING OUT OF VOGUE.

During the present term of the circuit court a majority of the cases have been tried by the Judge. It is only when a man has a very desperate case, one that will not stand the cool, calm judgment of the court, that his attorneys' insist upon a jury. In nine cases out of ten, litigants would fare much better in having the Judge pass upon their claims than to leave it to a jury of twelve men. The Judge is free from all prejudice in the case and listens dispassionately to the evidence. On the other hand it is hard to find twelve men that can try a case without some little prejudice, especially when the litigants are well known to some of the jury. If the jury trials could all be set for one certain part of the term and then the jury be dismissed as soon as their work was done it would save a deal of money each year.


Dr. COCHRANE sued the county for about $127 for medical services rendered to the poor in Farmer City and got a judgment for $120. It took the jury nearly five hours to figure down the amount.


Mrs. HILLIS received a decree of divorce from her husband and the guardianship of her children.


Justice GRIFFIN has been figuring about the court-house, "you know," as happy as a clam over his re-election in Tunbridge. In honor of the occasion the worthy Justice has been wearing his plug hat.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

AN INFANT'S BODY FOUND BURIED IN THE BRUSH.

There was wild commotion in Harp township for the past few days. Sunday last, Harrison CLEVENGER was on his way homeward and passed through Col. SNELL's pasture land, which is about five miles from this city and near the James WILLMORE farm. Under a Jack-oak tree he espied a new-made grave, and the next day he told the fact to some of his neighbors. As the Willmore graveyard was only a quarter of a mile beyond this lonely grave in the brush, there was a suspicion of foul play. The more the subject was discussed, the more excited the people became, till finally it was the unanimous opinion that the body should be exhumed, and if foul play was there, then the authors should be hunted down. Yesterday morning, Uncle D. HALL was notified of the suspicions of the neighbors, and selecting a jury of twelve men and two doctors, he proceeded to the place and held an inquest. A post-mortem examination was had when it was discovered that the child, a little boy, had lived probably two or three days. No one knew of a birth in the neighborhood, and there was a mystery surrounding this little grave. The coroner had the body removed to the Willmore graveyard, where it was interred. When the coroner and jury arrived in town in the afternoon, they heard that Dick SCALES, a tenant on one of the MAGILL farms, had lost an infant child a few days ago, and the probabilities were this might be the same. Our reporter followed up the story last evening, when it was fully confirmed. To say the least, it was a strange place to have buried an infant, especially when the graveyard was so near. This careless way of burial not only excited a whole neighborhood for several days, but incurred a cost of $75 or $100 on the county for the inquest.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE HOT SPRINGS COLONY.

The reputation of the Hot Springs as a fountain of healing waters has gained credit with health-seeking Clintonians, and each year quite a number make pilgrimage to Arkansas. And the best proof we have of the efficacy of the Springs is that all return home improved in health. Patients have gone from here who had to be carried to the cars on their beds, and in a few weeks they would return home with renewed life and vigor. During the past few days the following persons have left for the Hot Springs: Mr. H. MAGILL and his daughter, Miss Hattie; Geo. B. GRAHAM, his son Wade, and Mrs. GANDY; Mrs. KNADLER and her grandson, George EDMISTON; and Major V. WARNER.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Henry MAGILL and his daughter, Miss Hattie, have gone to Hot Springs, Ark., for the benefit of their health. Miss MAGILL was seized with paralysis in the lower limbs some months ago, which for a time crippled her so that she was unable to walk. By the advice of the family physician, the healing waters of the Hot Springs will be tried, with the hope that the young lady will recover the full use of her limbs.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE DESTRUCTIVE LIGHTNING.

During the heavy thunder-storm Monday evening, lightning struck Mr. James WATSON's barn in Creek township, killing two mules and a horse instantly and setting fire to the barn. Mr. Watson was in the barn at the time the lightning struck, and was standing in a stall between two mules. The outside mule first received the shock and fell dead. The lightning then flashed over Mr. Watson and the next mule and struck the third mule and a horse, instantly killing them. In a few moments Mr. Watson saw that his barn was on fire, the lightning having ignited the hay in the loft. He succeeded in getting out the surviving mule, and by this time the flames had gained such headway as to make it impossible to save anything else. One of the mules belonged to a hired hand. Mr. Watson's loss cannot be less than $800 or $1000, as everything in the barn was consumed. We understand that there was no insurance.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

SUNDAY AMUSEMENTS.

Last Sunday morning, John MEDLAND was attacked at the Central depot by Taylor FERGUSON, a bridge carpenter in the employ of the G. C. & S. company. It seems the dispute was about a pocket-knife that Medland found several months ago, and over which there was some wrangling once before. Ferguson met Medland and demanded the knife. Medland refused to give it up, when Ferguson struck him a furious blow in the face and tumbled poor John over. Ferguson not satisfied with this, jumped on Medland's body with his feet and kicked and pounded him brutally. In the melee, Medland had one of his ribs broken and his face gashed and torn in a horrible manner. Whatever induced a great, powerful man like Ferguson to jump on so weakly a man like Medland no one can pine, for heretofore Ferguson has borne the reputation of being a peaceable fellow. Had it not been for the interference of some men who were attracted to the spot by Medland's cries of "murder!" there is no telling what would have been the termination of Ferguson's brutality. As it is, Medland was confined to his bed for several days. Owing to Medland not being able to attend court, Justice RICHEY bound Ferguson over in the sum of $100 for his future appearance to answer for the assault.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

BEWARE OF MORPHINE.

Very few who begin the use of morphine for the allaying of pain have any idea of the risk they are running. A man or woman once addicted to its use is bound in fetters stronger than ever held a drunkard. A lady in this city, who have become a confirmed user of morphine, took an overdose the other morning which came very near ending her life. The fatal drug has become a necessity to her daily existence, and the first thing in the morning on awaking she must have her regular dose before she can even make her toilet. Years ago the doctors prescribed it to allay pain, and now she cannot live without it. A man in this city received an injury some time ago and his doctor prescribed morphine to allay the pain. When almost recovered there was still a soreness in the limb when the man followed his daily avocation. His doctor recommended him to take a little morphine now and then when he felt pain and it would relieve him. The man did so, and it was not long before he felt a growing desire for the fatal drug, especially when he had an extra amount of labor to perform. He did not know his danger till his attention was called to the fact; and fortunately for him he is a man of strong will power and can break the habit now. It would astonish a great many well-informed people did they really know the extent to which opium is used in this city and county. Beware of the deadly drug.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HUNTING SNIPES.

A new importation from Chicago thought the young men of this city very slow, and he volunteered several ideas to sharpen them up. The boys concluded to test the sharpness of the Chicagoan, so on Tuesday evening they invited him to go with them to hunt snipe. About dark the party got over by the cemetery grounds, and in a very remote place they posted Chicago, with bag in hand, with instructions to stand quietly there and as the snipe would come within reach he was to catch and bag them. Chicago waited patiently, bag in hand, for the coming snipe; but about ten o'clock not hearing his comrades or seeing any birds he began to think the sport was monotonous. By and by the idea began to crawl through his cranium that the Clinton boys had sold him out, so he came to the City Hotel, where he was greeted by his late companions in snipe shooting. Chicago set up the cigars for the boys on their promise not to let the story leak out.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

From the Hon. W. CARLE, we learn that the HARROLD boys in Texas have about ten thousand cattle on their ranch, and that they expect to ship about $50,000 worth of stock to Chicago during the present year. It takes about fourteen men to manage their large herd. The Harrold boys have a ranch of about fourteen miles square on which to feed their cattle, the pasturage not costing them a cent. This season they had about three thousand calves. A year or so ago they took with them to Texas forty-one young thorough-bred bulls. The cross between the native Texan and a thorough-bred makes large and heavy stock, which will command a much higher price in the Chicago markets. With the continuance of their present good luck for a few years longer, the Harrold boys will accumulate large fortunes. In a climate like Texas where pasturage is so fine and of spontaneous growth, the raising of cattle must be very profitable. It costs about $3 to raise a three-year old, including interest on investment and labor in herding.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The warm rain on Monday night gave the grass and sown grain a good start. Tuesday morning the fields looked handsome in their dress of green; the buds on the trees were bursting; the birds chirruped in their liveliest strain; and all nature rejoiced that the confounded muddy streets of Clinton would soon "dry up" for the summer season.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Ladies who are preparing to clean house and have their rooms painted, papered and calcimined, should not forget that Frank J. FACKRELL is one of the most expert workmen in that line of business. Mr. Fackrell is a comparative stranger in this city, but the work he has already done is a sufficient guarantee of his superior abilities as a painter and paper hanger.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

DOING THE HANDSOME THING.

The Hon. Will R. CARLE bought a set of gold mounted harness from Metzger yesterday, as a present for his wife. He is also negotiating with McIRVIN for one of his handsome phaetons. Will commenced this kind of business rather late in life, but now that the old fellow has enjoyed the sweets of matrimony he is willing to go his bottom dollar in surrounding his wife with the comforts and luxuries of life.

[Same date, different page]

Hon. W. R. CARLE is announced as a theatrical manager.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


April 20, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

By reference to another column it will be noticed that the Surgeons of the National Surgical Institute of Indianapolis, Indiana, will make a professional visit to our city on the 2d of May. We are happy to announce to our readers the coming of these skilled and experienced Surgeons and recommend all sufferers afflicted with any of the diseases or deformities which they treat to not fail to see them during their short stay at the Magill House.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

TAKING A CHANGE OF VENUE.
Three Prisoners Make Their Escape from the County Jail.

When Sheriff WEEDMAN, last Saturday evening, went to hand in five suppers to that number of boarders which ought to have been there, Tom BOLAN announced that two plates would be enough as the other three had eloped. The sheriff on examination of the jail found that a large stone slab in the north-west corner of the building was pulled partly down, that a hole had been made through the brick wall, and by this means Park McGOWAN, George MOORE and Alex McGOWAN had escaped. Once outside of the jail there was only a low brick wall to climb over. The three fellows who got out were seen leisurely to cross over toward the school grounds, after which all trace of them was lost. They had nearly two hours start before they were missed from the jail, and by that time they were able to get beyond reach. Tom Bolan and John EDWARDS, who were also in jail, did not avail themselves of the opportunity to escape, nor did they tell on their partners till further concealment was of no avail. Park McGowan and Moore were in for the burglary of WOY & SCOTT's hardware store, and the other McGowan was in for stealing a coat and some other articles, and the prospects of a term in Joliet looked very flattering for the three.

Bolan and Edwards say that Park McGowan was the chief agent in the party breaking out, and he did it in this way. When Deacon HOVEY first retired from the cares and anxieties of a busy life, Sheriff Weedman showed him a little more attention because he was an old man. It is not usual to give the prisoners knives to eat with, but the sheriff gave the good Deacon a knife. Park McGowan appropriated this knife out of which he made a saw. With this he cut through two iron bars that held the slab in place; and once the iron was cut there was no trouble in pulling the slab out. Park some years ago made a similar attempt on this same slab, and was nearly successful; and this knowledge was a great help to him last week. He began to cut the iron a week ago last Tuesday and only completed the job on Saturday afternoon. During the time he would be sawing the iron some of the other prisoners would stand in the doorway that led from the jail, so that on the approach of any member of the sheriff's family Park would be signaled and the sawing would stop. Everything was in readiness about five o'clock Saturday afternoon, and at that hour the sheriff was up town and no one in the front part of the building except Mrs. Weedman and the servant. Park and his fellow thieves, by moving very quietly, had no difficulty in getting out. Sheriff Weedman has thoroughly advertised the escaped prisoners, and he hopes to secure their return.

Alex McGowan took breakfast at a farmer's house below Kenney on Sunday morning, and he told there how they escaped. He says that Park McGowan had tools handed in from the outside. Alexander told the farmer that he intended to get out of this part of the country as quickly as possible, and he departed after eating a hearty breakfast.

The jail is very insecure, and has been since first it was built. Nearly every sheriff has had prisoners break out. If the county wishes to keep its prisoners after they are arrested steps should be taken toward making the jail perfectly secure.

[see BACK AGAIN]

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

The Mayor and City Council of the City of Clinton met in the Council Chamber May 7, 1877. Present: Hon. W. BISHOP, Mayor; Ald. HARWOOD, PHARES, HARRELL, KIRK and WINSLOW. The minutes of last meeting were read and approved. Ald. METZGER being absent the Mayor appointed Robert Phares to act in his stead on the finance committee on the bills then presented.

On motion the following bills were allowed:
HAND & LISENBY, hardware......................$8.25
Joseph ARMSTRONG, draying.....................$1.50
Ely RICK, draying.........................................$1.25
A. D. CACKLEY, draying.............................$3.75


Application was made by W. E. LILLARD to retail all kinds of liquors at the place now occupied by him for that purpose, on the north side of the public square, for the term of one year, from May 8, 1877. O. L. KIRK made objection to granting the application for the reason that no bonds were presented with the application. On motion of Robert PHARES, the application was allowed on his compliance with the statutes of the State and the ordinance of the city in such cases made and provided.


T. S. SMITH made application to run three billiard tables in the room now occupied by him in the basement of C. H. MOORE's brick building, on the south side of the public square, for the term of one year, from May 5, 1877. On motion, the application was allowed on his compliance with the ordinances in such cases made and provided.


The committee on Hook and Ladder Truck asked for further time, which was on motion granted.


The committee appointed on street lamps reported that the Night Watch was willing to have taken from his salary ten dollars per month and be exempt from the duty of tending to the lamps, or that he would employ a man to attend to them if the council would increase his salary twenty dollars per month and be responsible for his acts. They also reported several other persons as wanting the position of lamp tender at prices ranging from twenty to thirty dollars. On motion, the report of the committee was accepted and committee discharged. O. L. Kirk made motion that Wm. D. STOREY's proposition to reduce his salary ten dollars per month and be exempted from tending the street lamps be accepted and that the council at its next regular meeting receive bids for taking charge of the lamps. Carried.


The city attorney made report of ordinance in relation to the appointment of police officers and defining their duties, numbered ordinance No. 78. On motion, the ordinance was passed by the City Council of the City of Clinton, after which it was approved by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk. On motion, council adjourned.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WELDON.

Wm. WINSLOW and family are visiting relatives in Chicago.


James CHANEY has retired from the hotel business. Mrs. BENNETT will again take control of the Bennett House.


M. P. MOORHEAD has sold the hardware store to Mrs. Sarah A. MOORHEAD.


C. S. LISENBY is having his house repainted.


F. A. WINSLOW is building an addition to his dwelling house.


John CARR is preparing to build a new residence.


Jerry WOOD lost several fine hogs one night last week, by being poisoned. Mr. Wood claims to have found some of the poison in the lot the next morning. It would be well for all parties who lose hogs hereafter to satisfy themselves if possible whether they died of cholera or not, as other parties in the neighborhood think that their hogs have been poisoned also. If any person in the county is mean enough to do such deeds as these they should be hunted up and prompt punishment meted out to them.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAYNESVILLE.

Mrs. McDONALD and her sister, Miss PERCY, have gone to Iowa visiting.


David ATCHISON has received his new corn sheller, and says he can shell 2500 bushels per day with it.


Uncle Dan DRAGSTREM was up in town a few days ago, the first time since last fall.


Dr. STARKEY made an examination of the stomach of Stubblefield's Norman horse, Paris, which died recently and pronounces it a case of poison. This is $6000 they lost within eight days, one of their Norman mares, valued at $3000, having died just eight days before.


The M. E. Church and the Good Templars have compromised.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

LANE.

Farming is very backward with us on account of the heavy rains. Trade is very dull and probably will continue so till after harvest. Then we expect better times.


Our district school, taught by Mrs. BAYLESS, is progressing finely.


Sam the butcher has employed the barber to paint his dwelling-house, and a good job is the result.


Jas. FOSNAUGH is now entitled to have Esq. tacked to the tail of his name.


Dr. GARDNER and Mr. KIDDER visited friends in the country last Sunday, took dinner, talked to the girls, and didn't get home till it was late.


One of our boys wanted to see his girl the other night but between him and the idol of his heart was a slough. To get across he had to coon the fence, and when about half way over a crooked rail turned with him and he went floundering into the mire.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WAPELLA.

Mrs. TAYLOR, of Centralia, was in town this week.


William WRIGHT has shelled out the corn he had in crib here.


E. S. CADDY has erected a porch in front of his dwelling.


On last Friday George BROWN shipped one car load of hogs to Chicago.


C. J. CARLE received a car load of celebrated Vandalia flour on Saturday.


F. M. WILLIS brought of Mrs. GOSSARD on the south side of Main Street 40 x 80 feet. Consideration, $75. He will move his building and stock of groceries on the same in a short time.


Mrs. Byron WATSON, of LaSalle, and Mrs. John STONE, of Amboy, visited their mother, Mrs. GOSSARD, the latter part of the week, returning home on Saturday.


Rev. HAYES preached at the M. E. Church Sunday at 3 p.m. His family was with him. On account of poor health, he has been unable to fill his appointment here.


John SAVERLY, of Clinton, was in town Saturday hanging paper for Mrs. BRYANT.


Monday was rather unpleasant. Farmers are becoming discouraged on account of so much rain.


Five covered wagons passed through town during the week, wending their way westward.


Four-horse teams have been quite numerous this week. Bad roads were the cause.


There are a number of empty houses here for rent.


Fred BEAVER has left our town for a more genial clime. Fred tried blacksmithing, but our town and surrounding country could not support three blacksmith shops, hence his departure.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE END OF A GREAT MONOPOLY.

The great sewing machine combination which has had its grip for the past twenty years, and has amassed millions of dollars, tumbled to pieces on last Tuesday, the statute of limitations having run out in its case. To show what power this combination had it is only necessary to compare the price of sewing machines with their actual value. It has been proven time and again that it cost less than $15 to manufacture an $85 machine. The poor woman who had to use this aid in the support of her family had to contribute $70 to be pided among the few who controlled the ring and the agent who sold her the machine. By the expenditure of vast sums of money the ring was enabled to secure renewals on the various patents and thus keep out competition in the sale and manufacture. The patents having expired, anyone can now engage in the manufacture of sewing machines. The great companies appreciate this condition of affairs, and as a consequence machines can now be bought at nearly one-half the old price. Every woman can now afford to have a sewing machine.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 11, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THESE TRAMPLING THIEVES ARE GETTING VERY PARTICULAR AS TO WHERE THEY ARE KEPT.

Marshal HENSON had those three Chicago boys very comfortably caged in the calaboose, but the chirping of the robins outside made them long for freedom. Before them was a fair prospect of a term in the Reform School, for they are apparently under eighteen years of age. About eleven o'clock Wednesday morning the boys succeeded in breaking out of the cell in which they were confined and had the outer door nearly pried open when Frank PHARES heard them and put a stop to their efforts at freedom. They are now in jail and will probably give Sheriff WEEDAN some trouble. The boys are already old in crime and prison history, they having each spent several short terms in the Bridewell at Chicago.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 18, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE OLDEST INHABITANT WON'T KNOW IT WHEN HE COMES TO TOWN.

Of course the exterior can't be changed, for it is impossible for the leopard to change its spots—we have scripture proof for that—but when you come to the inside what a transformation! You remember the blackened ceilings; the dingy paper on the walls; the ancient cobwebs that festooned the windows; the dirt begrimed glass; the moldy smell that took away your breath. Of course you remember this as if it were but yesterday, and the oldest inhabitant will bear you out with an affidavit if necessary that the same condition existed when he was but a boy. It was in the merry month of May; the birds were caroling forth their sweetest notes in the deciduous trees that ornament the park in the center of which stands our temple of justice. At an early hour one morning a dusky son of Southern origin might have been seen cautiously entering the circuit clerk's office with mop and pail. Then he was followed by an artistic gentleman whose delight it is to throw soul into blackened ceilings with a whitewash brush. Following came the paper hanger. And presto change, the old office was so transformed that the clerk and his deputies hardly recognized themselves. The county clerk saw and wondered. The next thing his office was also undergoing a similar process. The sheriff caught the infection and his office, too, had to pass through the purifier's hands. And last of all the courthouse park has had a thorough overhauling. The inside of the old courthouse looks the better for this small expenditure in soap, whitewash and paper.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 18, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE.

Life is short at best, yet there are some people in this world who are in a hurry to cross the river of Jordan to take a peep at the promised land. The Maroa News of last week gives an account of Mrs. WOOLLEY's effort to leave this world. She is the wife of Tylee WOOLLEY, who lives in Texas township. Tylee wanted to go fishing with his father-in-law, T. W. JENKINS, but his wife objected. The couple have only been married about a year, therefore her word was law and Tylee went to tell his father-in-law that he could not go. Mrs. Woolley must have thought that he had gone to fish, so she deliberately went to work to make a corpse of herself. When he returned home he was horrified to find his wife lying on the floor, insensible, and with a rope around her neck. He at once gave the alarm, and in a short time a number of the neighbors came, who immediately instituted an examination into the case and elicited the following probable theory of the singular affair: That she had fastened the rope in a slip noose around her neck, then stepped upon a chair and fastened the other end of the rope in a ring in the ceiling; but the ring happened to be one of those known as open rings, and her weight had bent it so that the rope came out, and precipitated her unconscious to the floor. It seems that the only thing that prevented her carrying out her dreadful purpose was the giving way of the open ring. When the rope was removed the imprint of the same still remained upon her neck. But happily she was unhurt. No reason can be assigned for this attempt upon her life. The lady refused to give any reason in explanation of her singular conduct.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 18, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A cow belonging to Joe MORSE attacked Dr. T. K. EDMISTON's youngest daughter on the street the other day, and so badly was the child injured and scared that she was confined to her bed for several days.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


May 18, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

LOVE IN A CHATEAU.

If we mistake not THE PUBLIC has mentioned the fact that the Hon. William R. CARLE, formerly representative from this district in the State legislature, was married to a charming young lady from Bethany, West Virginia. At first Mr. Carle thought some of taking Horace Greeley's advice and going West—or rather southwest—to make his future home, but we are glad to know that he has abandoned the idea and has determined to live and die among the people who honored him with a seat in the State's capitol. The other day he bought one of the finest building sites within the sound of the city hall bell. It is a charming little nook on the banks of the classic Ten-mile. The land is wooded with tall towering pines and monarch oaks, and as the summer breezes away the branches it is as the music of an Aeolian harp. At the base of the hill, upon which is now being built a cottage of Gothic architecture, the stream expands and a beautiful sheet of water, inhabited by delicious trout, attracts the eye of the visitor. It is the intention of Mr. Carle to have several pleasure boats on this miniature lake, and during the summer season it will be the resort of the fashion and beauty of Clinton. The only wonder is that this enchanting spot has not heretofore been secured; its sylvan beauty must fire the artistic eye of our most celebrated landscape painters, and in time it will become a masterpiece for the canvas of some of our local artists. It will be a fitting home for the fair young Virginian bride, and as the work of building the chateau is now being pushed forward without regard to expense for labor, Clinton will one of these days be invited to a grand house-warming. The pine and oak trees that cover the handsome park were planted hundreds of years ago by some ancient Clintonian. The lake gives evidence of having at one time been navigable, and upon its proud bosom has probably floated the majestic ark which sheltered Noah and his family after one of those heavy showers to which DeWitt county is still subjected. THE PUBLIC will welcome Mr. Carle and his young bride within the corporate limits of Clinton; and when the home of love is finished and the blue smoke comes curling from the ivy-covered chimneys we will give a full description of the house and its appointments. We understand that Mr. Carle paid something like $1000 per acre for the grounds, and that the chateau when completed will cost not less than $75,000, which will include the choice paintings ordered from the studios in Italy and one of Ansell Hull's washing machines. Will had the reputation of being close in money matters, but his brief wedded life has opened his heart and his pocket-book, and his hoarded wealth flows like water. We understand that he will also build a pavilion on his grounds and that he will have the Wapella dramatic club, of which he is sole manager, give occasional exhibitions for the benefit of our county farm.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 1, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

BACK AGAIN.

A few weeks ago three of the prisoners confined in the county jail made their escape by cutting through the wall. One would suppose that the fellows who got out would give Clinton a wide berth, but it seems a criminal, like a moth around a candle, keeps always fluttering about the point of danger. Park McGOWAN and George MOORE, the burglars who broke into WOY & SCOTT's hardware store, went from here to Minonk, where they were probably beyond all danger of detection; but their destiny seemed to draw them hither. On Tuesday Moore was recognized and arrested in this city by Marshal HENSON. Park McGowan came as far as Heyworth Tuesday and there struck into the country. Henson got track of him and he and Smith WEEDMAN started out in pursuit. They first went to Heyworth and got on their trail and then followed up for abut thirty-six hours when they finally captured Park at Sue WALDEN's house up in Wilson township. Park and Moore are back again in their cells, and as they have cost Sheriff Weedman over $100 it is more than likely that he will keep a close watch on them till they are turned over to the warden of the penitentiary.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 1, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The festival last Friday night, for the benefit of the cemetery association, turned out very fair considering the opposition the object had. There seems to be a general misapprehension with regard to the cemetery and as to who are its owners. It belongs to every man or woman who owns a lot in it or who will become lot owners. It is managed by a board of directors, elected by the lot owners, and each lot owner has but one vote. The cemetery cannot be a source of profit to any person or persons, for all the money received from the sale of lots is spent in improving the grounds and to provide a perpetual fund for keeping the grounds in order. The gentlemen who organized the association advanced funds to buy the grounds and to pay for the work done thus far. This money will be paid back to them, and beyond that they have no pecuniary interest. They deserve the thanks of the community for their kindness. This much about the association.[?] We are sorry to say that but very few men of the city put in their appearance at the festival, and had it not been for the liberality of a few who did attend, and the determined spirit of the ladies, it would have been a failure anyhow. The ladies had everything arranged in an attractive style, and as the proceeds were for cemetery purposes each one did their best to bury the berries and iced-cream out of sight. The proceeds were $114.50, which amount was paid over to the secretary of the cemetery association. The ladies propose to get up an entertainment in the future, and they hope our citizens will generally inform themselves by that time as to the ownership of the cemetery so that there will be no one to throw obstacles in the way of its financial success.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 1, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WOODLAWN CEMETERY.

Clinton has now very handsome cemetery grounds. Till the new association was organized the cemetery was owned as a private enterprise and of course there was no guarantee of its being kept in proper order for all time to come. A few of our leading citizens took the matter in hand and purchased some thirty-five or forty acres additional to the old cemetery, they advancing their credit for that purpose. An association was regularly organized, and now Woodlawn Cemetery is the property of its lot owners. Every person who becomes the owner of a lot has all the rights of a member and has a voice and vote in the general management of affairs. To make the improvements and prepare the grounds for burial purposes has cost a large amount of money. The plans for beautifying the grounds are very elaborate and, as fast as money can be realized from the sale of lots, the directors propose to carry them out. Money is very much needed just now to pay for the laying out and grading of the carriage drives and walks through the new addition. The directors also desire to commence work on the miniature lake. To do this they propose to have a public sale of lots on Saturday the 9th of June, at which time lots in any part of the cemetery can be purchased. Woodlawn Cemetery is not a private enterprise nor does any inpidual or company make money out of it. The directors give their time for nothing. The only parties who receive pay are the secretary and the superintendent, and their salaries are merely nominal. The cemetery is the property of the lot owners, and the price paid for lots is spent in improving the grounds and keeping them permanently in order.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 1, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Amusements of the day are baseball and croquet.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


June 1, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

THE CLINTON SCHOOLS.

The Board of Education met Tuesday evening and elected the following corps of teachers for the next school year:

First Primary — Miss Zadie WOODS
Second Primary — Miss May CARLE
Third Primary — Miss Alice GRAHAM
Fourth Primary — Miss Fannie CLARK
First Intermediate — Miss Eva JONES
Second Intermediate — Miss Ella McHENRY
Third Intermediate — Mrs. S. E. RICHARDS, of Fort Dodge, Iowa
First Grammar — Miss Etta RAZEY
Second Grammar — Miss Ada WIRTZ, of Bloomington
High School — Benjamin HULL
Harp School — John E. MARTIN
Superintendent — Prof. F. L. MORROW

We are glad to see that the Board recognizes the ability of our Clinton scholars in the selection of teachers, as eight of the twelve elected are graduates of the Clinton high school. We understand that Miss HOLBROOK, the very successful teacher of the high school for the past four years was not a candidate, as it is her intention to go to Colorado to live. Seven of the old teachers have been retained. Mr. Ben Hull has been promoted to the high school, a position for which he is eminently qualified. He is a thorough teacher and has met with the best success in every department he has filled. Prof. Morrow came to Clinton a year ago under the most discouraging circumstances. By perseverance and close attention to every department under his charge he has been enabled to systemize affairs so that every room is now in good working order. The Board, as an appreciation of his ability, was unanimous in re-electing him for the next year.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 3, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A street lamp is to be placed on the corner of Mr. Samuel MAGILL's property.


Mr. and Mrs. A. R. PHARES mourn the death of their infant son. He died last Monday, after a brief illness.


A broken plank in a crossing on Monroe street resulted in throwing a lady down on Tuesday.


To make the DeWitt County Fair a success every man, woman and child in the county should at least visit it one day.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 3, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FAMILY REUNION.

The WEEDMAN family in this county is a numerous institution. Take them altogether they will figure up nearly one hundred members. Well, between eighty and ninety of them met in a grove near DeWitt, last Tuesday and with a few invited guests had a good sociable time. Our handsome sheriff was the center piece in the family group.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 3, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

FIRE.

Mr. Dan ROSENCRANS, of Dewitt township, was the unfortunate victim this time. Tuesday afternoon one of his barns was consumed by fire. In it was a lot of hay and farm machinery which was also destroyed. Mr. Rosencrans' loss is estimated at $1000, though it will take considerable more than that amount to repair the loss. His little girl was the cause of the whole trouble. A wagon load of hay was standing near the barn; the child thought it would make a brilliant bonfire, so she set a match to it, and hay, wagon, barn and implements were cremated.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 10, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLAR SUIT.

Hon. George A. SAUNDERS, of Springfield, was in this city yesterday to commence suit against the city for injury done to Wm. R. ROUNDS, son of Luther ROUNDS, by a defective sidewalk. In 1871, Wm. D. Rounds, who was then about six years of age, fell through a hole in the sidewalk in front of R. W. ROBINSON's lot, on the west side of the square, now owned by the MAGILL Bros. The boy's leg slipped though a broken plank and the severe wrench to his body caused permanent deformity. Mr. Rounds has employed the best medical skill in the country for his crippled son without avail. He now asks the city for the small sum of $15,000. The case will probably be tried at the next term of the circuit court. Mr. W. L. CHAMBERS is associated with Mr. Saunders in the prosecution.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 10, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

GONE WEST.

Some fifteen or twenty persons from this county took advantage of the Iowa excursion over the Illinois Central road, and left on Tuesday morning to visit that State. Among the number were Robert MILLARD and his son Decatur, Mr. and Mrs. Orin WAKEFIELD, Chas. McCORD, Wm. COTTINGHAM, the LEMON boys, and others whose names we can not now recall.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 10, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Dr. GOODBRAKE's hosts of friends in this city and county will no doubt be pleased to learn that he is coming back to Clinton and intends to make it his permanent home. The Doctor will arrive here within the next four or five weeks.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 10, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A GOOD RIDDANCE.

John ANDREWS, the man who was arrested last spring for stealing a pair of socks from North & Rose's store door, and for which he was tried at the last term of court and was sentenced to the county jail for twenty-four hours, took such a fancy to Clinton that he concluded to make this town his home. A couple of weeks ago he came back here with his wife and rented a house in the south part of town. Andrews is fond of whisky and the partner of his bosom has a weakness for the same fiery beverage. Last Saturday night there was a fracas at the Andrews mansion and Marshal HENSON was called in as umpire. He settled the matter by locking the pair up in the calaboose. Sunday morning they were liberated with a promise from them that they would submit to an interview before Justice RICHEY the next day. The marshal deferred the case again till Tuesday, and that morning the pair took the early train for Decatur, shaking the dust of inhospitable Clinton from off their feet. The city is now safely rid of them. Decatur is unfortunate.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 10, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

BACK FROM THE HILLS.

Warren WINSLOW and young Jeffrey, who went to the Black Hills some months ago in quest of gold, arrived in Clinton thoroughly disgusted with life in the gold regions. For a time they were enabled to work on some buildings that were being erected, but when they were completed nothing more was to be done. The mines are not turning out favorably, and as a consequence the miners are flocking from there to other localities. CARLE, SNELL & Co.'s stamping mill is at work, but the firm is not realizing as they expected. W. J. FEE made a little money during the early excitement, but he lost it all in later investments. The indications are that the Black Hills are a fraud.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

Sheriff WEEDMAN will have to swallow a few frogs to clear his throat. His calls from the south window of the courthouse are rather guttural.


Bob ORR, of Kenney, is in training for the Democratic nomination for county clerk. GLESSNER will never allow that, Bob, so you had better subside.


Deafness is not a reasonable excuse from jury duty. A grand juror and a petit juror tried it on Judge LACEY last Monday, but the Judge told them they could get closer to the witnesses.


John ELLIS, a Long Point youth, tried to be a horse jockey the other night. He is now in bed with a broken collarbone, a dislocated shoulder, and bruises from head to foot.


The grand jury brought in an indictment on Wednesday against Deacon HOVEY for embezzling the funds of the county at the close of his official career as county treasurer. He was locked up in jail that night, where he is likely to remain till his trial.


Jerry KELLY lost his valuable team of mares last Friday night. He has searched all over his section for miles and can get no tidings of them. He thinks that some communist who believes in a distribution of wealth took the mares as his portion.


Mr. DeLEVIS has so far recovered from his sulphuric acid bath that he can now attend to business during the daytime. As soon as the lamps are lighted in the store he has to go home, as the strong flare of the light weakens his sight. We are glad to announce this speedy recovery of our good brother.


From the number of witnesses that are summoned to meet the grand jury the indications are that at least one-half of the men in the county are indicted and the other half will put in an appearance as witnesses. The State's Attorney will at least need four pages in the next bar docket for criminal business.


McFADDEN, till a couple of weeks ago, used to vend whisky and beer to the boys in Weldon. The prospect of an interview with Judge LACEY was the cause of McFadden skipping out. He will be indicted, however, by the grand jury, as several of the boys were down here this week giving evidence.


Jim WALDEN struck a cattle bonanza Tuesday morning, when he was coming to this city. A farmer was driving out ten nice-looking steers as Jim as coming down the road, which made Jim's eyes fairly glisten. "How much will you take for the lot in cash," said Jim. "Three and one-half cents a pound," said the farmer. The bargain was closed, the cattle weighed, and Jim was just $50 richer.


"I am sixty," said a sprightly looking old fellow last Monday when Judge LACEY asked if any had good reasons to show why they should not serve their country as grand jurors. The Judge took a second glance at the youthful looking face and said, "That excuses you," but from the expression of the Judge's face one would come to the conclusion that His Honor thought that the elixir of life had surely been discovered near Farmer City.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WRIST BROKEN.

Last Sunday evening while Elder WAGGONER was holding up the beauties of a religious life to a large congregation at the camp meeting in Campbell's grove, a messenger arrived in all haste to summon Dr. WRIGHT to the bedside of a youthful granger who had fallen out of an apple tree and broke his wrist. The youth lives in the country some three or four miles from the city, but his name we could not learn. Don't climb apple trees on Sunday if you want to keep you limbs whole.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

TRAINING HORSES ON SUNDAY.

Good people will say that if Frank ADKISSON hadn't been engaged in breaking a horse last Sunday he would not now be groaning because of his pains and aches. Frank has a young colt and he was training him to the saddle. The colt reared up and threw Frank and then fell over upon him, causing considerable injury to Frank's bones and internal arrangements. The boy is recovering rapidly and in a few days will be ready to give that colt another tussle.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A CLOSE SCRATCH.

Jack METTLIN is a brakeman on a railroad leading out of Effingham. It was nip and tuck with him about three weeks ago. Jack was at the switch and as he finished moving the track his foot slipped and he fell just as the train of cars came backing down. He fell face downward and a part of his foot was on the rail, which the cars passed over and flattened out till Jack could hardly believe he had any foot left. The trucks grazed his back and tore his clothes off and punctured the flesh pretty badly. Jack was taken care of immediately, and for about three weeks he lay in rather a dangerous condition. He arrived home here a few days ago, and looks now as if he would be ready to try his luck again as a jolly brakeman.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A LITTLE BIT OF SCANDAL.

Charles A. SPRATT, of Rutledge, wishes that he was a resident in Brigham Young's dominions. There is such a thing as loving too much here in Illinois, and Charles has found it out to his sorrow. He got engaged to two young girls in his neighborhood, and, as matters were becoming rather pressing, Charles skipped out one fine day and left the fair ones to fight for his affections. They are both nice ladies and well connected. One of them, however, fell a victim to his amorous advances and is now mourning over her shame. Charles came back recently, and on his way to the marriage altar his victim had him arrested on the charge of bastardy. He gave bail for his appearance and married the other girl. At this term of court he will answer to Judge LACEY why he should not support his illegitimate offspring; and probably a suit for breach of promise may be the result.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HAS RETURNED.

Dr. GOODBRAKE could not stay away from Clinton. He tried to do so. The Doctor had lived here for thirty years, and knew every man, woman and child in town; but when he went to Auburn, Ind., every face he met on the street was a strange one, and his heart once more yearned for his old home in Clinton where he knew every one and every one knew him. It is hard to learn an old dog new tricks, and it was just as hard to make the old Doctor believe that he could be happy any where else than in Clinton. So here he is back again, with a vow registered that he will never more attempt at his time of life to go in search of new friends and a new home. He arrived on Wednesday morning. There will be rejoicing among the Doctor's old patients, as many of them could not content themselves to be comfortable sick without having him to prescribe for them.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A HARD CASE.

In 1871, judgment was rendered in the circuit court of this county in favor of G. W. GIDEON against a list of defendants, of which Harvey MERRIMAN was one. Part of the judgment was paid, but the balance run on because there was no tangible property out of which to make the amount. Harvey Merriman was the owner of two town lots on North Center street, on which he gave a trust deed to Hudson BURR for a sum of money. The mortgage was not paid when due and Mr. Burr had to buy in the property to save his clients. In making out an abstract of the title to the property before Mr. Burr made the loan, this judgment was overlooked by the party making the abstract, as in looking over the judgment book in the clerk's office the young man saw what he supposed was a written satisfaction of the full amount of Gideon's claim, but which in reality was only a part release. Mr. Burr afterward sold the lots to Mrs. DICKERSON and her son-in-law, and they went on and built a two-story house on the property. Now Mr. Gideon comes in with his old judgment and orders the sheriff to sell the property to satisfy his claim. Of course Mr. Gideon ought to have his money, but the question which presents itself to the non-legal mind is, is it right that Mrs. Dickerson and her son-in-law should lose their money in paying debts for which they were in no manner responsible? The probabilities are that the chancery court and the lawyers will have an opportunity to unravel this complicated question.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


August 31, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The case of Alexander KELLY against Wm. COTTINGHAM was put over till the next term of the circuit court. Mr. Cottingham was one of Tom KELLY's bondsmen, and Alex Kelly is suing him for his portion of the defaulting bond. Mr. Cottingham claims that Tom Kelly has paid to his father some $1500 to be applied on the defalcation, and he thinks Alexander Kelly should pay that amount in and release the bondsmen to that extent.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


October 19, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WILL NOT BE OUTDONE.

An Irishman stopped at FUNK's planing mill the other day for the purpose of ordering material for a new picket fence. Said he: "Mr. Funk, I want the nicest bit of a fence ye ever made in your shop. Me neighbor has just put up a new fince in front of his house, and begorra I am determined to bate him if it takes the last pig on me farm." Funk promised to get up something fine, and the Irishman went away happy.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


October 19, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HERE'S YER MULES.

A young man from the neighborhood of Waynesville came to Clinton the other day and filled up with tanglefoot. Starting homeward in the evening, his mules became unmanageable and when near the cemetery the team ran off, throwing the driver into the ditch. The team was stopped some distance out of town and the parties came back in search of the driver. They found him still lying in the ditch. He was aroused and started homeward.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 16, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

Farmer CAMPBELL has become a middleman and is now buying and shipping hogs and cattle. The Grange should expel him at once.


W. H. OGLEVEE, of Waynesville, shipped this week two car-loads of fine cattle to Ohio, having sold them to a farmer there who intends to feed them.


Miss CARPENTER having resigned her position as teacher in the public schools, the board of education elected Mr. LOCKE to fill the vacancy.


All the employees of the railway mail service will have to wear a regulation uniform. Bro. MITCHELL and Frank MARTIN will look tony in their suit of blue and gold buttons.


A burglar broke into Mr. FRANK's house a few nights ago. Miss Jennie LEWIS saw the fellow and yelled, and this brought Bill BARNETT downstairs in a hurry. Exit burglar without any little tokens.


The city marshal of Urbana tried to whip DUNLAP, the city editor of the Champaign Gazette, but didn't quite succeed. It was all on account of a little error, which was explained before the fight.


The Hon. Schuyler COLFAX will lecture in the M. E. Church, on Tuesday evening, December 4, on the life of and character of Abraham LINCOLN. Reserved seats can be secured at Stiles' jewelry store.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 16, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A WOLF HUNT.

Of late, some of the sheep raisers over in Texas township have lost a number of sheep, and as Bill MOORE swore he saw a wolf on the road the night before election, it was determined to get up a grand hunt and drive the scourge (the wolf, not Bill) from the face of fair Texas. Smith FULLER and Bill BREALSFORD were invited to bring their hounds, and all the sports of the county gathered Wednesday morning at Jake ZIEGLERS's, which was designated as the starting point. Every man was mounted, and in each eye and on each face might have been seen legibly written a determination to have that wolf's scalp, or, like the Spartan youth, each man would be brought home on his shield. The western hunter of olden time, the kind of chap Fennimore Cooper wrote about, rarely brought his great intellect down to anything less than a panther or a bear, but our DeWitt county nimrods must needs content themselves with a polecat, or, at rare intervals, a wolf. Were we in the right state of mind we might write a history of the ravenous wolf; but of what use would that be, when over in Texas township they are bred and reared as pets for ladies.

Wednesday morning the clouds were heavy and threatening and old Sol could barely peep through the thick gloom that hid from mortal gaze the far-off heavens. The mud was of that peculiar consistency that would almost engulf a horse and scarcely leave the rider's head above mother earth. This did not discourage our wolf hunters; they had started out to catch the pesky varmint and nothing short of a wolf scalp at their girdles would appease their thirst for blood. Jake Ziegler had at his home a pet wolf, one of a litter that he had captured some months ago. In order to get the dogs down to business, it was deemed advisable for Jake to go ahead of the hunters for about a mile and lead his pet wolf so as to get the hounds on the trail.

Jake mounted his Rosinante and string in hand started off leading his wolf. When about a mile from the house the wolf fell from sheer exhaustion and Jake was in a bad fix. Had it been a lady in a faint, Jake would at once have understood what remedies to apply, but here was a fainting wolf on his hands and a pack of hounds in full pursuit, and what was he to do? Dismounting from his horse, he talked English to that wolf and then tried Dutch, but not a muscle would it move. Presently down came the hounds and surrounded Jake and his wolf, and for a few moments it was a battle for life. There sat Jake with his pet in his arms and a fierce pack of hounds glaring on him, thirsting for the blood of the young coyote. Finally the hunters came to the rescue, and Jake again mounted his horse and taking his pet wolf in his arms started homeward. The hunters and the hounds beat the country far and wide but not even the sight of a wolf rewarded them for their hard day's ride. But the sheep killing goes on the same as ever. John PHARES offers to bet all he lost on the late election that there is not a wolf in Texas township. He says that the sheep killing is done by dogs and the owners of the dogs blame it on wolves to avoid trouble.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 23, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

A man in Farmer City advertises that he has $50,000 to lend. Send him down here; we will borrow it if no one else wants it.


Those who have empty houses prepare to rent them now. Don't expect exorbitant rents.


HALDEMAN's mill will be Centrally located when the Central runs its Y around it.


The photograph gallery on the south side of the square has been opened by Geo. W. BROWNING.


Miss Eunice HOOPER, G.W.V.T. of the Good Templars, visited the Good Templars lodge in this city last Monday evening.


There was a little shooting match in the South Ward the other evening, but no harm done. Jealousy.


John CUPPY has gone west to see the country and marry a girl with a $10,000 fortune.


The pay car on the main line of the Central passed over the road Monday, leaving treasure and happiness at every town on the line.


There was mud enough without the last rains, yet notwithstanding this fact, we had a steady pour down Tuesday and Wednesday.


If our subscribers want us to enjoy Thanksgiving day in a proper frame of mind let them send in the amount they owe on subscription.


Charles HURD, in Wilson township, is fortunate. His corn crop will average near fifty bushels to the acre, and it is of extra quality.


John HARTSOCK, of Texas, had a valuable horse stolen from his barn lot last Sunday night. Horse thieves are too numerous for the comfort of farmers.

Note: This should be George Hartsock, not John Hartsock. See article December 7, 1877.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 23, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

ARREST OF BURGLARS.

Charles BECKMAN, a Swede, and Billy WIGGINS, who claims to be one of the Pittsburg strikers, were arrested by Marshal HENSON, on Monday, on suspicion of burglarizing in Maroa. The fellows are professional tramps and would rather steal than work. Col. KELLY, last summer, gave Beckman work and thought him industrious; but since then he has reversed his judgment. Last Saturday Dr. McLEAN's family, at Maroa, in the fullness of their hearts fed these two thieving tramps, and the fellows to repay the kindness went back late in the evening and stole two overcoats, a dress coat, two vests, and a pair of pants, and then came north. On Sunday Marshal Henson got it into his head that Wiggins answered the description of the McLean county murderer so he run him into the calaboose to await developments. The (a few words missing…) turned out that he was not the man. Afterward the marshal heard of the Maroa robbery, and as Wiggins and Beckman had suits corresponding to the description of those stolen, he arrested the pair. Tuesday they were sent to Maroa, where they confessed everything, and Squire JONES committed them to the jail at Decatur for trial at the next term of the circuit court. Marshal Henson deserves great credit for his skill in spotting thieves.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 23, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

AN OUTRAGE.

Put a gun in the hands of some young men and it makes a fool of them. Jake ZIEGLER had a steer killed a short time ago by one of those pot hunters who trespassed on his farm, and the other day some of them went on Ben Hill's farm and shot some of his chickens. The result of all this is that the farmers prohibit anybody hunting on their premises.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 23, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

A CONTUMACIOUS ADMINISTRATOR.

J. D. WEBSTER lives in Lincoln. He is the brother of the late Miram WEBSTER, the jeweler who did business in the store now occupied by Israel CAMPBELL and who died more than two years ago. J. D. was appointed administrator, and he has given considerable trouble to the creditors of the estate. Some of the claims are yet unpaid although the stock of goods which his brother left has long since been paid for. Webster doesn't like to face our county judge because he probes too closely into the affairs of the estate. This week he was notified to appear before the probate court but paid no attention to the citation. On Monday Judge Walker issued a capias and sent it to the Sheriff of Logan county for execution. That night Sheriff MORRIS brought his prisoner to this city and delivered him over to Sheriff WEEDMAN. Tuesday morning Judge WALKER fined Webster $15 and costs, which will probably teach him a lesson that he will not forget in a hurry.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 30, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

CITY AND COUNTY.

Dan CRANG is feeding some choice cattle, sheep and hogs for Christmas week.


MAHAN & NAGELY have three hundred bushels of choice apples to sell.


Circuit Court begins next Monday. The docket is set for trial cases on Tuesday.


W. J. LEAVITT delivers sewing machines in a brand new buggy.


Some of the sidewalks in this city might make kindling wood; they are not safe to walk upon.


Thursday was a biting reminder that it was time to lay off summer clothing and put on an overcoat.


The children and teachers of the public schools returned special thanks yesterday because they had a holiday.


It is said that salt plentifully thrown into a stove will extinguish a fire in a chimney. It may be well to remember this.


The boys had an old-fashioned turkey shooting match at Hick MILLS' on Wednesday afternoon.


Alph. W. HYDE is at home enjoying vacation from school. He returns to Onargo next week.


The Odd Fellows and all the Rebekahs will be at the M. E. Church next Tuesday evening to see and hear the author of the Rebekah degree.


The flavor of the flesh of a domestic duck can be very much improved by feeding the duck on the leaves and refuse of celery stalks a few days before killing it.


Our old friend David RICHARDSON, county surveyor, has been called in the past two weeks to follow two of his youngest children to the grave. Ald. O. L. KIRK and wife also mourn the death of their last born.


Thanksgiving Day was cold, dreary and blustery, yet we have no doubt the good people of this county enjoyed their turkey with more relish on account of it. There is nothing like a dreary outlook to make one enjoy home comforts and good cheer.


Mr. W. LEAVITT, of Bloomington, has bought Argo Bros. hay press and will buy and bale hay for the Eastern and Southern markets. His family occupies the Hanger house, next to Mayor Bishop's. We bid Mr. Leavitt and family welcome to Clinton.


The alarm of fire yesterday morning made our citizens hustle out of bed before daylight at a lively rate and out into the cold wind. The alarm was caused by the burning of the chimney on Mr. George B. LANE's house, on North Madison street. No damage done.


The grand jury, next week, can have a little job of interviewing those men in Wapella who know the fellows that broke down the door of a house in that town and attempted to outrage the woman in the absence of her husband. It was chivalric for a gang of stalwart ruffians to attack one weak woman.


Thirteen railroad men have been killed by a bridge which spans the Illinois Central railroad, a few miles south of Freeport. The bridge is so low that the men on top of freight cars are knocked off unless they are very careful. Thomas NASH, an employee of the road for twenty years, was the last victim.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 30, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Robert L. CASE, the swindling President of the Security Life Insurance company, has been sentenced to five years imprisonment in the New York State prison, for perjury in swearing to false returns for the purpose of cheating the policy holders. The editor of THE PUBLIC was one of the victims, therefore we take great pleasure in knowing that Mr. Case has met with his just reward. We had a ten-year policy in the Security on which was paid all but the last premium. We have been rather unfortunate in life insurance, three of the four companies in which we held policies having collapsed.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


November 30, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

MEMORIAL SERVICE.

Next Sabbath, at half past ten in the morning, Dr. GRAY proposes to hold a memorial service in the interest of the children. The exercises will be arranged and conducted in such a manner as will be interesting and profitable to all. In the last twenty days no less than seven children have died in this city.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


December 7, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

OVER THE HILL TO THE POOR-HOUSE.

The discussions at the board of supervisors this week disclosed the fact that several aged and infirm persons as well as some children are thrown on the public charity of the county for support whose relations are well able to save them from the humiliating condition. As we heard no names mentioned, the discussion being in progress when we entered the board room, we do not know to whom of the citizens of the county the members had personal reference. One case was cited of an aged and infirm woman who had been receiving weekly aid from the supervisor for some time. A resolution was offered forbidding any further donations of money, and also directing the supervisor to remove her to the poor-house. This aged lady has a brother in this county who is the owner of a good farm of eighty acres, well provided with every thing to make life comfortable. She has a number of other relations who could afford to keep her from being an object of public charity, yet to the poor-house she must go. Poor old woman! She has outlived the husband of her youth and nothing remains for her but "over the hill to the poor-house." This is but one of a number of instances. Another family had an aged uncle who lived with them for about three months. The old man was not able to earn a living, but made his home among his relations. The man presented a bill to the county this week for $36, being at the rate of $3 per week. The board, very properly, refused to pay it. A strong, healthy man and his robust wife in Creek township buried their only child last April and refused to pay four dollars for the coffin in which the child was buried. The undertaker presented his bill to the board and it was not allowed. This man had work during the year, but preferred that his only child be buried as a pauper rather than he should pay for its little coffin. There is a splendid field for missionary work here at home. The most benighted savage could scarcely be more heartless than in the three cases above cited.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


December 7, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

SMALL PROFITS AND QUICK RETURNS.

Sam DOSS is a harness maker and lived at Lane Station. He was industrious and well respected. But Sam fell from grace and will suffer the penalty of all wrongdoers, except defaulting officers. Jacob HARROLD owns a grocery store at Lane, and for some time past has missed goods. Someone had entrance to his store during the night and the supposition is that he helped himself liberally. The matter was talked over time and again in the store during the long winter evenings and Sam Doss was the most bitter in denouncing the unknown thief. Harrold watched for several nights, but as he always told a few of his confidential friends that he was going to do so, the burglar never came at these times. Last Monday night Harrold concluded to stay on watch and say nothing about it, and just before daylight Tuesday morning he was rewarded for his long vigil by hearing someone stealthily enter the store. Presently his man came within reach and Harrold collared him. There stood Doss, caught in the very act. Doss finally confessed that he had been helping himself in the past, and it was he who had done all the stealing. Doss was placed under arrest and brought to this city Tuesday morning. The grand jury promptly indicted him and yesterday Judge BURR sentenced him to one year's imprisonment at Joliet. For a very small amount of stealing Doss will have to leave his wife and family for a year and work for the State for his board.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


December 7, 1877
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

RUNNING OFF HORSES.

The great army of tramps will not walk while a horse is to be found. We have had several cases in this county during the past few months where horses have been stolen from stables and fields and ridden off by tramps, and when the horses give out or the tramp thinks its time for the news to get after him, he turns the horse loose and then steals another. George HARTSOCK had a valuable horse stolen from his barn yard one night a couple of weeks ago, and the other day the horse came back looking jaded and wearied as if after traveling a great distance. Jake ZIEGLER lost a valuable mare last Monday evening, and a couple of days afterward she was found near Hallsville. The mare was jaded and worn out. If this thing keeps up much longer, some horse thief will take a view of nature dangling from the limb of a tree.

Submitted by Judy Simpson


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